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The Celestial Railroad
     

The Celestial Railroad

4.3 10
by Nathaniel Hawthorne
 

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"The Celestial Railroad" is short story written as an allegory by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne. In it, Hawthorne parodies the seventeenth-century book The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan, which portrays a Christian's spiritual "journey" through life. In this story, the pilgrim journeys by iron horse rather than by foot, the burden of sin that Bunyan portrays

Overview

"The Celestial Railroad" is short story written as an allegory by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne. In it, Hawthorne parodies the seventeenth-century book The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan, which portrays a Christian's spiritual "journey" through life. In this story, the pilgrim journeys by iron horse rather than by foot, the burden of sin that Bunyan portrays is pulled by the same train...

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781484147429
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
04/17/2013
Pages:
26
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.05(d)

Meet the Author

Nathaniel Hawthorne, (born July 4, 1804, Salem, Mass., U.S.-died May 19, 1864, Plymouth, N.H.), American novelist and short-story writer who was a master of the allegorical and symbolic tale. One of the greatest fiction writers in American literature, he is best known for The Scarlet Letter (1850) and The House of the Seven Gables (1851).

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
July 4, 1804
Date of Death:
May 19, 1864
Place of Birth:
Salem, Massachusetts
Place of Death:
Plymouth, New Hampshire
Education:
Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, 1824

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The celestial railroad 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ClaytH More than 1 year ago
This is a digitized version of an old edition of the story. The transcription is so poor that the text is barely readable. Perhaps the Gutenberg Project does a better job.