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The Celtic Book of Names: Traditional Names from Ireland, Scotland, and Wales
     

The Celtic Book of Names: Traditional Names from Ireland, Scotland, and Wales

by D. J. Conway, D.J. Conway
 
From Presidents Reagan and Clinton to entertainers Carroll O'Connor and Aidan Quinn, it's clear that Celtic heritage abounds in the United States. While the names Aileen, Glenna, and Morgan are generally well known, what about Siobbhan, Fiona, or Branwen? If your last name is O'Brian, MacQueen, or Ellis, you may well already know of your Irish, Scottish, or Welsh

Overview

From Presidents Reagan and Clinton to entertainers Carroll O'Connor and Aidan Quinn, it's clear that Celtic heritage abounds in the United States. While the names Aileen, Glenna, and Morgan are generally well known, what about Siobbhan, Fiona, or Branwen? If your last name is O'Brian, MacQueen, or Ellis, you may well already know of your Irish, Scottish, or Welsh background. But if your name is Roche, Preston, or Bonner, have you discovered a new branch in your family tree?

The Celtic Book of Names offers the most comprehensive collection of names available. Included is an alphabetical list of women's and men's names, divided by Irish, Scottish, or Welsh background. Each entry includes the meaning, legends or historical references, and variants of the name. Also provided is a comprehensive list of family surnames and a retelling of common Celtic myths and legends to give the names context.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Conway, who has written numerous books on Celtic topics (e.g., Celtic Magic, Llewellyn, 1990) features traditional names from Ireland, Scotland, and Wales but not Cornwall, the Isle of Man, or Brittany. The book is arranged alphabetically by first names, surnames, and names associated with myths and legends, and the introduction provides a succinct history of the Celts. Interestingly, many first names have become surnames, especially in Ireland and Scotland. For example, O'Brien means "son of Brien" and mac Cumail refers to the son of Cumail. Correct pronunciation for personal names is given where spelling differs from pronunciation, but there are times when pronunciation is impossible to determine. Accent marks are highlighted as well. Conway suggests that readers use a dependable Gaelic dictionary for the Celtic country of choice. This is a good reference source, complete with bibliography and snippets of history sprinkled throughout. Celtic descendants living in North America should like this title; a less comprehensive choice is Loreto Todd's Celtic Names for Children (Irish American, 1998).--Larry R. Little, Penticton P.L., BC Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
Offers primarily American readers two types of reference. The lists and meanings of given names could be used to find a name for a baby; the list of surnames can enlighten people on meanings and geographical origins. The arrangement is first by country, then in the case of given names by gender. Names and traits of deities are also listed. The treatment is not scholarly rigorous, but anyone who can tell has deeper resources to consult. Conway provides excellent pronunciation guides for names that sound different than their spelling would indicate to English speakers. She does not include an index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknew.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780806520964
Publisher:
Kensington
Publication date:
06/01/2000
Pages:
229
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.24(h) x 0.71(d)

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