The Chalice: A Novel

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Overview

In the midst of England’s Reformation, a young novice will risk everything to defy the most powerful men of her era.

In 1538, England’s bloody power struggle between crown and cross threatens to tear the country apart. Novice Joanna Stafford has tasted the wrath of the royal court, discovered what lies within the king’s torture rooms, and escaped death at the hands of those desperate to possess the power of an ancient relic.

Even with all she ...

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The Chalice: A Novel

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Overview

In the midst of England’s Reformation, a young novice will risk everything to defy the most powerful men of her era.

In 1538, England’s bloody power struggle between crown and cross threatens to tear the country apart. Novice Joanna Stafford has tasted the wrath of the royal court, discovered what lies within the king’s torture rooms, and escaped death at the hands of those desperate to possess the power of an ancient relic.

Even with all she has experienced, the quiet life is not for Joanna. Despite the possibilities of arrest and imprisonment, she becomes caught up in a shadowy international plot targeting Henry VIII himself. As the power plays turn vicious, Joanna realizes her role is more critical than she’d ever imagined. She must choose between those she loves most and assuming her part in a prophecy foretold by three seers. Repelled by violence, Joanna seizes a future with a man who loves her. But no matter how hard she tries, she cannot escape the spreading darkness of her destiny.

To learn the final, sinister piece of the prophecy, she flees across Europe with a corrupt spy sent by Spain. As she completes the puzzle in the dungeon of a twelfth-century Belgian fortress, Joanna realizes the life of Henry VIII as well as the future of Christendom are in her hands—hands that must someday hold the chalice that lies at the center of these deadly prophecies. . . .

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Editorial Reviews

DuJour magazine - Bonnie Sommerville
“I loved the story, the characters, and the rich detail of the novel, making you feel you are there with Joanna on every page. So much emotion and drama- as well as facts to keep you riveted from the first page. And surprise twists for even the most hard to please mystery fans! I loved it.”
Booklist
"Bilyeau paints a moving portrait of Catholicism during the Reformation and of reclusive, spiritual people adjusting to the world outside the cloister. This intriguing and suspenseful historical novel pairs well with C. J. Sansom’s Dissolution (2003) and has the insightful feminine perspective of Brenda Rickman Vantrease’s The Heretic’s Wife (2010)."
Entertainment Weekly
"Bilyeau sends her plucky former novice back into the intrigue-laden court of Henry VIII."
(Top Pick) - RT Book Reviews
“The novel is riveting, and provides fascinating insight into the lives of displaced nuns and priests during the tumultuous Tudor period. Bilyeau creates fully realized characters, with complex actions and emotions, driving the machinations of these historic personages.”
Parade
"English history buffs and mystery fans alike will revel in Nancy Bilyeau's richly detailed sequel to The Crown."
Free Lance-Star
“A brilliant and gripping page-turner…A fascinating blend of politics, religion, mysticism and personal turmoil. Well-researched and filled with sumptuous detail, it follows Joanna’s early life from Bilyeau’s début novel, The Crown, but this book easily stands on its own. Bilyeau fills in the blanks from her earlier work while leaving the reader both wanting to read the first book and eagerly awaiting the next. This is a must-read for lovers of historical fiction.”
(Top Pick) RT Book Reviews
“The novel is riveting, and provides fascinating insight into the lives of displaced nuns and priests during the tumultuous Tudor period. Bilyeau creates fully realized characters, with complex actions and emotions, driving the machinations of these historic personages.”
Mysterious Women
“Superbly written, well researched.”
Andrew Pyper
"The Chalice is a compelling and pacey time machine to the 16th Century. And when you're returned to the present, you'll have enjoyed an adventure and gained a new perspective on a past you'd wrongly thought to be a done deal."
From the Publisher
“A brilliant and gripping page-turner…A fascinating blend of politics, religion, mysticism and personal turmoil. Well-researched and filled with sumptuous detail, it follows Joanna’s early life from Bilyeau’s début novel, The Crown, but this book easily stands on its own. Bilyeau fills in the blanks from her earlier work while leaving the reader both wanting to read the first book and eagerly awaiting the next. This is a must-read for lovers of historical fiction.”

"English history buffs and mystery fans alike will revel in Nancy Bilyeau's richly detailed sequel to The Crown."

“The novel is riveting, and provides fascinating insight into the lives of displaced nuns and priests during the tumultuous Tudor period. Bilyeau creates fully realized characters, with complex actions and emotions, driving the machinations of these historic personages.”

"Bilyeau sends her plucky former novice back into the intrigue-laden court of Henry VIII."

“Superbly written, well researched.”

"Bilyeau paints a moving portrait of Catholicism during the Reformation and of reclusive, spiritual people adjusting to the world outside the cloister. This intriguing and suspenseful historical novel pairs well with C. J. Sansom’s Dissolution (2003) and has the insightful feminine perspective of Brenda Rickman Vantrease’s The Heretic’s Wife (2010)."

“I loved the story, the characters, and the rich detail of the novel, making you feel you are there with Joanna on every page. So much emotion and drama- as well as facts to keep you riveted from the first page. And surprise twists for even the most hard to please mystery fans! I loved it.”

"[A] layered book of historical suspense."

"The Chalice is a compelling and pacey time machine to the 16th Century. And when you're returned to the present, you'll have enjoyed an adventure and gained a new perspective on a past you'd wrongly thought to be a done deal."

The Chalice offers a fresh, dynamic look into Tudor England's most powerful, volatile personalities: Henry VIII, the Duke of Norfolk, Stephen Gardiner and Bloody Mary Tudor. Heroine and former nun Joanna Stafford is beautiful, bold and in lethal danger. Bilyeau writes compellingly of people and places that demand your attention and don't let you go even after the last exciting page.

Historical Novel Society
“Bilyeau continues from her first novel the subtle, complex development of Joanna’s character and combines that with a fast-paced, unexpected plot to hold the reader’s interest on every page . . . history and supernatural mysticism combine in this compelling thriller.”
C.W. Gortner
"Rarely have the terrors of Henry VIII's reformation been so exciting. Court intrigue, bloody executions, and haunting emotional entanglements create a heady brew of mystery and adventure that sweeps us from the devastation of the ransacked cloisters to the dangerous spy centers of London and the Low Countries, as ex-novice Joanna Stafford fights to save her way of life and fulfill an ancient prophecy, before everything she loves is destroyed."
Kris Waldherr
"Superbly set in the political and religious turmoil between Henry VIII's queens Jane Seymour and Anne of Cleves, The Chalice is a dark, twisty thriller that I couldn't put down. Nancy Bilyeau's extensive historical research makes the sense of dread, danger, and mysticism permeating this era tangible. Ex-Dominican novice Joanna Stafford is an especially compelling and sympathetic heroine—I adored her!"
M.J. Rose
"An exciting and satisfying novel of historical suspense that cements Nancy Bilyeau as one of the genre's rising stars. The indominable Joanna Stafford is back with a cast of powerful and fascinating characters and a memorable story that is gripping while you are reading and haunting after you are done. Bravo! The Chalice is a fabulous read."
Karen Harper
The Chalice offers a fresh, dynamic look into Tudor England's most powerful, volatile personalities: Henry VIII, the Duke of Norfolk, Stephen Gardiner and Bloody Mary Tudor. Heroine and former nun Joanna Stafford is beautiful, bold and in lethal danger. Bilyeau writes compellingly of people and places that demand your attention and don't let you go even after the last exciting page.
Kate Forsyth
"An utterly enthralling Tudor thriller."
Shelf Awareness
"The Chalice is an engrossing mix of the complicated politics of the Reformation with the magical elements of the Dominican order, and Joanna—fiery, passionate, determined to honor what she thinks God wants her to do—is a fascinating character. Fans of historical mysteries, Tudor politics and supernatural fiction will all be pleased by the broad scope, quick-moving plot and historical integrity of Bilyeau's second novel."
Parade
"English history buffs and mystery fans alike will revel in Nancy Bilyeau's richly detailed sequel to The Crown."
Kirkus Reviews
A historical novel set during the time of Henry VIII. It opens in Canterbury in 1528, when the heroine, Joanna Stafford, is only 17 and her mother, worried about her daughter's health, pretends to take her to benefit from healing waters there. In fact, it is her mother's desire to have her daughter meet a woman with the gift of prophecy, a woman who is the first to see the role Joanna is destined to play in the future of the ongoing conflict between the crown and the cross. Her mother had come from Spain with Katherine of Aragon and married into an English family related to the Tudors. Because an uncle, the Duke of Buckingham, had been executed for treason after soliciting prophetic information about the death and heirs of King Henry, Joanna prefers to obey the command of her cousin to never solicit the knowledge or advice of seers. Her mother's distress, however, moves her, and she pays attention to the first of what will be three seers who reveal, in progressive parts, her ultimate destiny. The next chapter moves us to Dartford in 1538, at which time we see Joanna as a nun whose beauty inspires an uncomfortable lust in the men who meet her. Thereafter, Joanna, who would like to start a tapestry weaving business, continues to deny and resist her ultimate destiny but eventually, after an agonizing period of indecision, gives in and agrees to travel to Ghent (the birthplace of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V) to meet with the third seer. Joanna's interest in weaving tapestries is an appropriate analogy for this layered book of historical suspense.
DuJour Magazine
“I loved the story, the characters and the rich detail of the novel. . . . So much emotion and drama, and surprise twists for even the most hard-to-please mystery fans!”
Parade.com
“English history buffs and mystery fans alike will revel in Nancy Bilyeau's richly detailed sequel to The Crown.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781476708652
  • Publisher: Touchstone
  • Publication date: 3/5/2013
  • Pages: 485
  • Sales rank: 1,413,156
  • Product dimensions: 6.42 (w) x 9.08 (h) x 1.46 (d)

Meet the Author

Nancy Bilyeau, author of The Crown and The Chalice, is a writer and magazine editor who has worked on the staffs of InStyle, Rolling Stone, Entertainment Weekly, and Good Housekeeping. She is currently the executive editor of Du Jour magazine. A native of the Midwest, she lives in New York City with her husband and two children. Visit her website at NancyBilyeau.com.
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Read an Excerpt

Chalice

1

CANTERBURY

SEPTEMBER 25, 1528


Before the lash of the wind drew blood, before I felt it first move through the air, our horses knew that something was coming.

I was seventeen, and I had made the long journey down to Canterbury from my home, Stafford Castle. At the beginning of each autumn my father traveled to London to attend to family business, but he had not wanted me or my mother to accompany him. A bout of sweating sickness struck the South that summer and he feared we’d lose our lives to the lingering reach of that disease. My mother would not be dissuaded. She told him she feared for my life if I did not take the healing waters at a bath she knew of in Canterbury, to cure me of melancholia.

Once in London, my father remained in our house on the Strand, seeing to business, while we rode on with two servants to Canterbury. The day after we arrived, my mother, greatly excited, took me to the shore overlooking the sea. But when we reached it, and I gazed for the first time at those churning gray waves, my mother’s temper changed. She had not seen the sea herself since coming to England from Spain at fourteen as a maid of honor to Katherine of Aragon. After a few moments of silence, she began to weep. Her tears deepened into wrenching sobs. I did not know what to say, so I said nothing. I touched her shoulder and a moment later she stopped.

The third day in Canterbury I was taken to be healed. Below a tall house on a fashionable street stretched an ancient grotto. We walked down a set of stairs, and then two stout young women lowered me into the stone bath. It brimmed with pungent water bubbling up from a spring. I sat in it, motionless. Every so often, I could make out strange colors beneath the surging water: bright reddish brown and a deep blue-gray. Mosaics, we were told.

“A Roman built this bath,” explained the woman who administered the treatment. “There was a forum in the city, temples, even theaters. Everything was leveled by the Saxons, but below ground it’s still here. A city below the city.”

The bath mistress turned my head, this way and that. “How do you feel, mistress? Stronger?” She so wanted to please us. Outside London and the ranks of the nobility, it was not known how much our family lost in the fall of the Duke of Buckingham, my father’s eldest brother. He was executed after being falsely accused of high treason, and nearly all Stafford land was seized by the Crown. Here, in a Canterbury bath, we were mistaken for people of importance.

“I feel better,” I murmured. The woman smiled with pride. I glanced over at my mother. She refolded her hands in her lap. I had not fooled her.

The next morning, I expected to begin the journey back to London. But while I was in bed, my mother lay next to me. She turned on her side and ran her fingers through my hair, as she used to when I was a child. We had the same black tresses. Her hair thinned later on—in truth, it fell out in patches—but she never grayed. “Juana, I’ve made arrangements to see a young nun,” she said.

There was nothing surprising about her making such a plan. In Spain, my mother’s family spent as much time as possible with nuns and monks and friars. They visited the abbeys that dotted the hills of Castile, to pray in the churches, bow to the holy relics, or meditate through the night in austere cells. The religious houses near Stafford Castle could not compare. “Not a single mystic within a day’s ride of here,” she’d moan.

As we readied ourselves, my mother told me about Sister Elizabeth Barton. The Benedictine nun had an unusual story. Just two years earlier she’d worked as a servant for the steward of the Archbishop of Canterbury. She fell ill and for weeks lay senseless. She woke up healed—and her first question was about a child who lived nearby who had also sickened, but only after Elizabeth Barton lost consciousness. There was no way she could have known of it. From that day on, she was aware of things happening in other rooms, in other houses, even miles away. Archbishop Warham sent men to examine her and they concluded that her gifts were genuine. It was decided that this young servant should take holy vows and so be protected from the world. The Holy Maid of Kent now resided in the priory of Saint Sepulchre, but she sometimes granted audiences to those with pressing questions.

“Her prayers could be meaningful,” my mother said, pushing my hair behind my ears. There was a time when meeting such a person would have intrigued me. But I felt no such anticipation. With our maid’s help, I silently dressed.

When I first left the household of Queen Katherine over a year ago, I would not speak to anyone. I wept or I lay in bed, my arms wrapped around my body. My mother had to force food into me. Everyone attributed it to the shock of the king’s request for an annulment—the queen, devastated, wailed loudly; the tall, furious monarch stormed from the room. This happened on the first day I entered service, to be a maid of honor to the blessed queen, as my mother had before me. The annulment was without question a frightening scandal.

But, from the beginning, my mother had suspected something else. She must have pressed me for answers a hundred times. I never, ever considered telling her or my father the truth. It was not just my intense shame. George Boleyn bragged that he was a favored courtier. His sister Anne was the beloved of the king. If my father, a Stafford, knew the truth—that Boleyn had violently touched me, his hand clapped over my mouth, and would have raped me had he more time—there is no force on earth that could have prevented him from trying to kill George Boleyn. As for my mother, the blood of ancient Spanish nobility, she would be even more ferocious in her revenge. To protect my parents, I said nothing. I blamed myself for what happened. I would not ruin my parents’ lives—and those of the rest of the Stafford family—because of that stupidity.

By the time summer ended in 1527, a certain dullness overtook me. I welcomed this reprieve from tumultuous emotion, but it worried my mother. She could not believe I’d lost interest in books and music, once my principal joys. I spent the following months—the longest winter of my life—drifting in a gray expanse of nothing. The apothecary summoned to Stafford Castle diagnosed melancholia, but the barber-surgeon said no, my humors were not aligned and I was too phlegmatic. Each diagnosis called for conflicting remedy. My mother argued with them both. When spring came, she decided to trust her own instincts in nursing me. I did regain my health but never all of my spirits. My Stafford relatives approved of the quieter, docile Joanna—I’d always been a headstrong girl—but my mother fretted.

That morning in Canterbury, when we’d finished dressing, my mother declared we had no need of servants. The priory of Saint Sepulchre was not far outside the city walls.

Our maid was plainly glad to be free of us for a few hours. The manservant was a different matter. “Sir Richard said I was to stay by your side at all times,” he said.

“And I am telling you to occupy yourself in some other way,” my mother snapped. “Canterbury is an honest city, and I know the way.”

The manservant aimed a look of hatred at her back. As much as they loved my father, the castle staff loathed my mother. She was difficult—and she was foreign. The English distrusted all foreigners, and in particular imperious females.

It was a fair day, warmer than expected for the season. We took the main road leading out of the city. Majestic oaks lined each side. A low brick wall surrounded Canterbury, most likely built by the Romans all those centuries ago.

As we neared the wall, my horse stopped dead. I shook the reins. But instead of starting up again, he shimmied sideways, edging off the road. I had never known my horse—or any horse—to move in this way.

My mother turned around, her face a question. But just at that moment, her horse gave her trouble as well. She brandished the small whip she always carried.

The winds came then. I managed to get my horse back onto the road, but he was still skittish. The wind blew his mane back so violently, it was like a hard fringe snapping at my face. By this time, we had managed to reach the gap in the wall where the road spilled out of Canterbury. All the trees swayed and bent, even the oaks, as if paying homage to a harsh master.

“Madre, we should go back.” I had to shout to be heard over the roar.

“No, we go on, Juana,” she shouted. Her black Spanish hood rose and flapped around her head, like a horned halo. “We must go on.”

I followed my mother to the priory of Saint Sepulchre. Dead brush hurtled over the ground. A brace of rabbits streaked across the road, and my horse backed up, whinnying. It took all my strength on the reins to prevent him from bolting. Ahead of me, my mother turned and pointed at a building to the left.

I never knew what struck me. My mother later said it was a branch, careening wildly through the air. All I knew was the pain that clawed my cheek, followed by a thick spreading wetness.

I would have been thrown but for a bearded man who emerged from the windstorm and grabbed the reins. The man helped me down and into a small stone gatehouse. My mother was already inside. She called out her gratitude in Spanish. The man dampened a cloth, and she cleaned the blood off my face.

“It’s not a deep cut, thank the Virgin,” my mother said, and instructed me to press the cloth hard on my skin.

“How much farther to the priory?” I asked.

“We are at Saint Sepulchre now, this man is the porter,” she said. “It’s just a few steps to the main doors.”

The porter escorted us to the long stone building. The wind blew so strong that I feared I’d be sent flying through the air, like the broken branch. The porter shoved open tall wooden doors. He did not stay—he said he must see to the safety of our horses. Seconds later, I heard the click of a bolt on the other side of the door.

We were locked inside Saint Sepulchre.

I knew little of the life of a nun. Friars, who had freedom of movement, sometimes visited Stafford Castle. I had not given thought to the meaning of enclosure. Nuns, like monks, were intended to live apart from the world, for prayer and study. That much I knew. But now I also began to grasp that enclosure might require enforcement.

There was one high window in the square room. The wind beat against the glass with untamed ferocity. No candles brightened the dimness. There was no furniture nor any tapestries.

A framed portrait of a man did hang on the wall. The man wore plain robes; his long white beard rested on his cowl. He carried a wooden staff. Each corner of the frame was embellished with a carving of a leafed branch.

My mother gasped and clutched my arm. With her other, she pointed at a dark form floating toward us from the far end of the room. A few seconds later we realized it was a woman. She wore a long black habit and a black veil, and so had melted into the darkness. As she drew nearer, I could see she was quite old, with large, pale blue eyes.

“I am Sister Anne, I welcome you to the priory of Saint Sepulchre,” she said.

My mother, in contrast to the nun’s gentle manner, spoke in a loud, nervous tumble, her hands in motion. We were expected, she said. A visitation had been granted with Sister Elizabeth Barton, the storm roughened our journey, and I’d been slightly injured, but we expected to go forward. Sister Anne took it all in with perfect calm.

“The prioress will want to speak with you,” she said, and turned back the way she came, to lead us. We followed her down a passageway even darker than the room we’d waited in. The nun must have been at least sixty years of age, yet she walked with youthful ease.

There were three doors along the hall. Sister Anne opened the last one on the left and ushered us into another dim, empty room.

“But where is the prioress?” demanded my mother. “As I’ve told you, Sister, we are expected.”

Sister Anne bowed and left. I could tell from the way my mother pursed her lips she was unhappy with how we’d been treated thus far.

In this room stood two wooden tables. One was large, with a bench behind it. The other was narrow, pushed against a wall. I noticed the floor was freshly swept and the walls showed no stains of age. The priory might have been modest, but it was scrupulously maintained.

“How is your cut?” my mother asked. She lifted the cloth and peered at my cheek. “The bleeding has stopped. Does it still hurt?”

“No,” I lied.

I spotted a book mounted on the narrow table and decided to inspect it more closely. The leather cover was dominated by a gleaming picture of a robed man with a white beard, holding a staff—similar to the portrait in the front chamber but more detailed. The beatific pride of his expression, the folds of his brown robe, the clouds soaring above his head—all were rendered in rich, dazzling colors. Running along the square border of the man’s picture was an intertwined branch: thin with slender green leaves. With great care, I opened the book. It was written in Latin, a language I had dedicated myself to since I was eight years old. The Life of Saint Benedict of Nursia, read the title. Underneath was his span of life: AD 480 to 543. There was a black bird below the dates, holding a loaf of bread in its beak. I turned another page and began to absorb the story. Underneath a picture of a teenage boy in the tunic of a Roman, it said that Saint Benedict forsook his family’s wealth, choosing to leave the city where he was raised. Another turn showed him alone, surrounded by mountains.

I’d been concentrating so closely that I didn’t hear my mother until she stood right next to me. “Ah, the founder of the Benedictines,” she said. She pointed at the branches that stretched across the border of each page. “The olive branch is so lovely; it’s the symbol of their order.”

My finger froze on the page. I realized that for the first time since last May, when I submitted myself to the profligate court of Henry VIII, I felt true curiosity. Was it the violent force of the wind—had it ripped the lassitude from me? Or had I been awakened by this spare, humble priory and the dazzling beauty of this, its precious object?

The door opened. A woman strode into the room. She was younger than the first nun—close in age to my mother. Her face was sharply sculpted, with high cheekbones.

“I am the prioress, Sister Philippa Jonys.”

My mother leaped forward and seized the prioress’s hand to kiss it and go down on one knee. It was not only theatricality: I knew that in Spain, deep obeisance was paid to the heads of holy houses. But the prioress’s eyes widened at the sight of my prostrate mother.

Pulling her hand free, the prioress said, “I regret to hear of your mishap. We are a Benedictine house, sworn to hospitality, and will offer you a place of rest until you are ready to resume your journey.”

My mother sputtered, “But we are here to see Sister Elizabeth Barton. It was arranged. I corresponded with Doctor Bocking while still at Stafford Castle.”

I stared at my mother in surprise. My impression had been that the trip to Saint Sepulchre was spontaneous, arranged in Canterbury or London at the earliest. I began to comprehend that the healing waters served as an excuse to get us here. Coming to Saint Sepulchre, without servants to observe us, was her purpose.

“I have not been informed of this visitation, and nothing occurs here without my approval,” the prioress said.

Most would be intimidated by such a rebuff. Not Lady Isabella Stafford.

“Doctor Bocking, the monk who I understand is the spiritual advisor of Sister Elizabeth, wrote to me granting permission,” my mother said. “I would have brought his letter as proof, but I did not expect that the wife of Sir Richard Stafford—and a lady-in-waiting to the queen of England—could be disbelieved.”

The prioress clutched the leather belt that clinched her habit. “This is a priory, not the court of the king. Sister Elizabeth is a member of our community. We have six nuns at Saint Sepulchre. Six. There is much work to be done, earthly responsibilities as well as spiritual. These visits rob Sister Elizabeth of her health. ‘Will this harvest be better?’ ‘Will I marry again?’ She cannot spend all of her time with such pleadings.”

“I am not here to inquire about harvests,” snapped my mother.

“Then why are you here?”

With a glance at me, my mother said, “My daughter has not been well for some time. If I knew what course to take—what her future might hold—”

“Mama, no,” I interrupted, horrified. “We were ordered by Cousin Henry never to solicit prophecy, after the Duke of Buckingham’s—”

“Be silent,” scolded my mother. “This is not of the same import.”

There was a tap on the door, and Sister Anne reappeared.

“Sister Elizabeth said she will see the girl named Joanna now,” the elderly nun murmured.

“Did you tell her of these guests?” demanded the prioress.

Sister Anne shook her head. The prioress and nun stared at each other. A peculiar emotion throbbed in the air.

My mother did not notice it. “Please, without further delay, show us the way to Sister Elizabeth,” she said, triumphant.

Sister Anne bowed her head. “Forgive me, Lady Stafford, but Sister Elizabeth said she will see the girl Joanna alone. And that she must come of her own free will and unconstrained.”

“But I don’t want to see her at all,” I protested.

My mother took me by the shoulders. Her face was flushed; I feared she was close to tears. “Oh, you must, Juana,” she said. “Por favor. Ask her what is to be done. Sister Elizabeth has a gift, a vision. Only she can guide us. I can’t cope with this anymore all alone. I can’t.”

I had not realized how much my spiritual affliction troubled my mother. Her suffering filled me with remorse. I would go to this strange young nun. The visit should be brief; I intended to ask few questions.

The prioress and Sister Anne spoke together, in hushed tones, for another minute. Then the prioress beckoned for me alone to follow.

She led me down the passageway, through the front entranceway, and down another dim corridor. Following her, I thought of how the elegance of her movements contrasted with the ladies I’d grown up with. Hers was certainly not movement calculated to draw admiration. It was grace that derived from simplicity and economy of movement.

I also tried to plan how I could speak to Sister Elizabeth Barton without disobeying the command of Lord Henry Stafford, my cousin and head of the family. It had been the prophecy of a friar, much distorted, that was the basis for arresting my uncle, the Duke of Buckingham. During the trial, he was charged with seeking to learn the future—how long would Henry VIII live and would he produce sons—so that the duke could plot to seize the throne. Afterward, my cautious cousin, his son, said repeatedly that none of the family could ever have anything to do with prophecy. My father agreed—he harbored a personal distaste for seers, witches, and necromancers. It was one of the many ways in which he differed from my mother.

The prioress rapped on a door, gently. She hesitated, her eyebrows furrowing, and then she opened it and we stepped inside.

This room was tiny, as small as a servant’s. A lone figure sat in the middle of the floor, slumped over, her back to us. There was no window. Two candles that burned on either side of the door provided the only light.

“Sister Elizabeth, will you attend Vespers later?” asked the prioress.

The figure nodded but did not turn around. The prioress said to me, “I shall be back shortly,” and gestured for me to step forward.

I edged inside. The prioress closed the door.

Sister Elizabeth Barton wore the same black habit as the others. She didn’t turn around. I felt awkward. Unwanted. The minutes crept by.

“It’s a wind that brings no rain,” said a young voice.

“Indeed, Sister,” I said, relieved that she spoke. “There wasn’t any rain.” But a second later I wondered how she knew anything about the elements without a window in the room. Another nun must have told her, I concluded. Just as someone told her my name—the monk Doctor Bocking, perhaps. I did not believe that she possessed the powers my mother spoke of. Although devout, I held closer to the spirit of my pragmatic father in such matters.

White hands reached out and Sister Elizabeth turned herself around, slowly, sitting on the floor. This nun was but a girl, and so frail looking. She had a long face, with a sloping chin.

As she gazed up at me, sadness filled her eyes.

“I did not know you would be so young,” she whispered.

“I am seventeen,” I said. “You look to be the same age.”

“I am twenty-two,” she said, and continued: “You have intelligence, piety, strength, and beauty. And noble blood. All the things I lack.” There was no envy. It was as if she mulled a list of goods to be purchased at market.

Ignoring her assessment of me, which I found embarrassing, I asked, “How can you say you lack piety when you are a sister of Christ?”

“God chose me,” she said. “I was a servant, of no importance in the world. He chose me to speak the truth. I have no choice. I must submit to His will. For you it is different. You have a true spiritual calling.”

Sister Elizabeth Barton was confused. “I am not a nun,” I said.

She frowned, as if she were responding to someone else’s voice. She slowly rose to her feet. She was spare and small, at least three inches shorter than me.

“Yes, the two cardinals are coming,” she said. “It will be within the month. They will pass through on the way to London. I will have to try to speak to them. I must find the courage to go before all the highest and most powerful men in the land.”

My mother had said nothing of Sister Elizabeth leaving Saint Sepulchre to go before the powerful. “Why would you do that?” I asked.

“To stop them,” she said.

I was torn. A part of me was curious, but another, larger, part was growing uneasy. There was nothing malevolent about this fragile nun, yet her words made me uncomfortable.

At last the curious part won. “Whom must you stop, Sister?” I asked. “The cardinals?”

She shook her head and took two steps toward me. “You know, Joanna.”

“No, Sister Elizabeth, I don’t.”

“Your mother wants to know your future—should she marry you off in the country to someone who will take you with meager dowry, or try to return you to the court of the king? Your true vocation leaps in her face, but she cannot see. Poor woman. She has no notion of what she has set in motion by bringing you to me.”

How could the Holy Maid of Kent know so much of my family? Yet I said, nervously, “Sister, I don’t know what you are talking about.”

Her lower lip trembled. “When the cow doth ride the bull, then priest beware thy skull,” she said.

My stomach clenched. At last, I had heard a prophecy.

“Those are not my words,” Sister Elizabeth continued. “They come from the lips of Mother Shipton. Do you know of her?”

I shook my head.

“Born in a cave in Yorkshire,” she said, her words coming fast. “A girl without a father—a bastard of the north. Hated and scorned by all. Not just for deformity of face but for the power of her words. Crone, they call her. Witch. It is so wretched to know the truth, Joanna. To see things no one else can see. To have to try to stop evil before it is too late.”

“What sort of evil?” The instant I asked the question, I regretted it.

Again the nun’s lower lip trembled. Her eyes gleamed with tears.

“The Boleyns,” she said.

I stumbled back and hit the stone wall, hard. I felt behind me for the door. I hadn’t heard the prioress lock it. I would find a way out of this room. I must.

“Oh, you’re so frightened, forgive me,” she wailed, tears spattering her face. “I don’t want this fate for you. I know that you’ve already been touched by the evil. I will try my hardest, Joanna. I don’t want you to be the one.”

“The one?” I repeated, still feeling for the door.

Sister Elizabeth stretched her arms wide, her palms facing the ceiling. “You are the one who will come after,” she said.

The gravity of her words, coupled with the way she spread her hands, chilled me to the marrow.

Sister Elizabeth opened her mouth, as if to say something else, and then shut it. Her face turned bright red. But in a flash, the red drained away, leaving her skin ashen. I looked at the candles. How could a person change color in such a manner? But the candles burned steadily.

“Are you unwell, Sister?” I said. “Shall I seek help?”

She shook her head, violently, but not to say no to me. Her head, her arms, her legs—every part of her shook. Her tongue bobbed in and out of her mouth. After less than a minute of this, her knees gave way and she collapsed.

“It hurts,” she moaned, writhing on her back. “It hurts.”

“I will get you help,” I said.

“No, no, no,” she said, her voice a hoarse stammer. “Joanna Stafford . . . hear me. I . . . beg . . . you.”

Fighting down my terror, I knelt on the floor beside her. A trail of white foam eased out of her gaping mouth. She thrashed and coughed; I thought she would lose consciousness. But she didn’t.

“I see abbeys crumbling to dust,” she said. The choking and thrashing ended. Incredibly, the voice of Sister Elizabeth Barton boomed strong and clear. “I see the blood of monks spilled across the land. Books are destroyed. Statues toppled. Relics defiled. I see the greatest men of the kingdom with heads struck off. The common folk will hang, even the children. Friars will starve. Queens will die.”

Rocking back and forth, I moaned, “No, no, no. This can’t be.”

“You are the one who will come after,” she said, her voice stronger still. “I am the first of three seers. If I fail, you must go before the second and then the third, to receive the full prophesy and learn what you must do. But only of your own free will. After the third has prophesied, nothing can stop it, Joanna Stafford. Nothing.”

“But I can’t,” I cried. “I can’t do anything. I’m no one—and I’m too afraid.”

In a voice so loud it echoed in her cell, Sister Elizabeth said, “When the raven climbs the rope, the dog must soar like the hawk. When the raven climbs the rope, the dog must soar like the hawk.”

The door flew open. The prioress and Sister Anne hurried to the fallen nun, kneeling beside her. Sister Elizabeth Barton said just two words more, before the prioress pried open her jaw and Sister Anne pushed in a rag. She turned her head, to find me with her fierce eyes, and then she spoke.

“The chalice . . .”

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 8, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Book of the year for me !

    Honestly I was not too excited about reading this book and I had for gotten how much I loved The Crown and I was tired of this time period but Nancy made me fall in love all over again.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 14, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Beautiful Historical Fiction!

    Author Nancy Bilyeau that takes us back to the reign of King Henry VIII in her novel The Chalice, book two in her historical fiction series, The Crown. Young novice Joanna Stafford, a distant relative of King Henry VIII becomes embroiled in a conspiracy that makes her an unwilling pawn when prophets and politicians face off against each other in this beautifully told historical work. Joanna is intelligent and strong-willed with a highly developed sense of duty and honor that take her on a journey fraught with danger and intrigue as opposing forces fight for power. Politics versus religious power, Joanna must decide which road she will take, because in the end, the choices are hers to make.

    The richly detailed scenes, the dialogue and the atmosphere created in The Chalice tells me that Nancy Bilyeau has made a commitment to her craft and is gifted with the ability to bring everything together into a riveting tale that transcends time! The brutality and inequalities of the era, the machinations of the royal court, as well as the struggles of life in general during a time where turmoil was the norm will draw you in and hold you to the very last page. For the historical fiction reader, this is a gem of a find!

    A copy was provided by the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 11, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    The Chalice is the sequel to Nancy Bilyeau¿s debut novel, The Cr

    The Chalice is the sequel to Nancy Bilyeau’s debut novel, The Crown. It is a story about a young woman named Joanna Stafford, a Dominican nun during the reign of King Henry VIII and the terrible period of Reformation that followed. As King Henry orders monasteries and convents closed down, it displaces Joanna along with many other nuns, monks, friars, and priests. As Joanna struggles to sustain herself, she finds herself caught in a dangerous prophecy that becomes entwined with a plot against the king himself. As the story progresses, so does the tension as Joanna finds herself inextricably trapped in one peril after another until its very satisfying ending.
    Sister Elizabeth Barton, a prophetic nun of the times, who was put to death by King Henry VIII plays a fascinating role early on in the story. This is one of the authors talents is to weave subplots and info about true historical figures into her stories. And his makes the story real, vibrant, and filled with curiosities. 
    Having read numerous Tudor novels, the historical details portrayed in this novel are accurate and well researched. This story has much to recommend it – prophetic seers, betrayal, murder, mystery, and intrigue are all prevalent here. Coupled with Nancy Bilyeau’s excellent writing style, the story is engrossing, even for those who are tired of the Tudors. Although this is a sequel to The Crown, the author’s first novel, it does stand alone very well. But I because both books are excellent reads, I do recommend you read them both and preferably in order. Very entertaining novels which I highly recommend.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 6, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Joanna Stafford, former novice, has escaped the Tower of London

    Joanna Stafford, former novice, has escaped the Tower of London while so many others have gone on to torture, beheading, and burning at the stake, all at the hands of King Henry VIII.  The year is 1538 and Joanna is trying to adjust to the life of a common woman, a difficult task given her noble background, all of which readers may have encountered in the prequel to this novel, The Crown: A Novel.   Having heard two prophecies about her role in the supposed downfall of the King, she wants no more knowledge as death has stalked everyone who is connected to her.  




    As the King is destroying more monasteries and carrying out the Reformation through Thomas Cromwell, Joanna now learns that others are conniving to have European leaders attack England in order to restore the Catholic faith Henry has so thoroughly worked at stamping out.  Meanwhile, two men love Joanna and the course of these potential romances is a lovely and frightening one indeed.  For Joanna is not trusted and spies watch her every move, while others are using everything in their power to get her to agree to hear the third and final prophecy.  This is the story of temptation in so many ways, with Joanna experiencing physical desire at the same time she knows horror of what the future could bring.




    For now Joanna is developing her talent as a seamstress, designing tapestries that awe all who see them.  Suddenly, her quiet life is shattered and after many fruitless arguments, she agrees to finish the task that seems to be divinely inspired.  She will travel to Belgium, be held prisoner when she once again refuses to cooperate with the powers that totally oppose the King, and then meet a famous seer who has just been accused of being a converso by the notorious Inquisition.  Finally, a revelation will clarify what she has struggled with for years upon years and she will embrace her task with faith.  Will she succeed?  How will England fare with so much division rife throughout the country and other nations?




    Nancy Bilyeau is a very talented writer who has spun a brilliant work of historical fiction, as well as a tense plot replete with complex, dynamic characters.  Obviously well-researched, The Chalice immediately draws the reader into the story, urging support and opposition at all the right places, crafting complexity to several riddles within the account, and inserting just enough levity and love to balance out the "humanity" of all the characters.  For motivations and outcomes do not always exist as pure and simple as one would want but follow the complexity of the times in which this story takes place.




    The Chalice: A Novel is finely crafted historical fiction.  It, as well as its prequel, deserves the status of "classic historical fiction." Congratulations, Nancy Bilyeau on an amazing, enjoyable and noteworthy series!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 3, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Nancy Bilyeau's debut novel, The Crown, released last year. Newl

    Nancy Bilyeau's debut novel, The Crown, released last year. Newly released is the second book in this series, The Chalice.

    The Crown introduced us to Joanna Stafford, a novice nun, in 1537 Tudor England. I was immediately captured by the character of Joanna in this first book, as well as Bilyeau's use of this time period as her setting.

    The Chalice picks up where The Crown left off (but new readers would be able to start with this book - a flashback chapter provides the needed background)

    It is a year later and the country is being torn apart by a power struggle between the King and the Church. Despite wanting nothing more than to live a quiet life, Joanna discovers that she herself must play a role in determining the outcome in the clash between Henry VIII and the Church. Her role in the country's future was foretold by a seer when she was still a young novice. And that seer also predicted that Joanna would hear two more prophecies from two other sages.

    Bilyeau has again proven what a stellar researcher she is. I am not overly familiar with this time period and often found myself heading to the computer to follow up on characters and historical facts. Bilyeau has done a fantastic job of weaving a fictional tale and the past together. The time period, the settings and the descriptions are just as much a character in the story as is Joanna. The prose are rich and full, immersing the reader in this tumultuous time period.

    Joanna continues to be a character that intrigues me. She is torn between her loyalties - to her country, her King, her family and her church. But in The Chalice she is also forced to look at her own desires - she has fallen in love. She is a stubborn, courageous woman determined to do what she must. Can this young woman truly alter the course of history or her own destiny?

    "Destiny. There is a destiny one creates. And there is a destiny ordained."

    Bilyeau weaves together history, adventure, intrigue and yes, romance to create a second tale that historical fiction fans will love. I look forward to the the next book in this series - Joanna's story is far from finished.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 30, 2013

    Check out the full review at Kritters Ramblings The next adventu

    Check out the full review at Kritters Ramblings
    The next adventure with the novice, Joanna Stafford as she tries to save the land from losing the ability to practice their Faith from the hands of evil men.  The story starts a bit in the future and then takes you back to find out how they all end up hiding around a church ready for an ambush - I thought this was the perfect way to set up and start the book.    

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 20, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    As you can already see Nancy Bilyeau is one of my favorite histo

    As you can already see Nancy Bilyeau is one of my favorite historical fiction authors.

    This dark and dreamy book of hers is just a scrumptious read. It carries us through the Tudor Reformation on the legs of Joanna Stafford a beautiful, aristocratic, displaced nun who is chased by prophesies. Like enticing pieces of dark chocolate, this book kept me hungry to read chapter after chapter into the night. It's one of those books that takes hold in an insidious way...before you know it, you're completely hooked.



    Nancy Bilyeau's writing is full of historical detail, but it isn't dry reading. Her work is like a tapestry that's interwoven with dark and light threads that balance the whole causing your eye to move easily throughout the story. It draws you along and keeps you intrigued. While Henry VIII is mentioned, he isn't a major figure in this book, but a shadow figure whose dictates play upon the central ones. A refreshing look on the Tudor period!



    Characters in "The Chalice" are alive and exciting! I loved each one in their roles. Joanna Stafford is a wonderful, strong young woman with a mind of her own and a little temper that walks her on the edge of real trouble, adding to the anxious elements of the story. Other characters are beautifully created, too. I enjoyed the love interests here, and their commitments to church and Joanna. Those involved in necromancy and prophecy are eye-opening!



    This is a book that stands alone in historical fiction today. It's a great read, and one you shouldn't miss. Although you can read it as a "stand alone," I would still recommend getting the first book in the series, "The Crown." Both of the books are rich in detail and storyline. Couldn't put this one down.



    A dark and rich mystery, and a story of the Reformation through the eyes of a very early feminist, "The Chalice" is one book to have this Spring!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2013

    You will like if you read "The Crown"

    As with most sequels this book is not as well written as the first, but you will enjoy if you like the characters. I personally did not care for the depictions of "seers " that were central to the plot. I also wish the love story had a resolution. Oh well, I guess that means I will have to buy the next book too.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 8, 2013

    The Chalice is the second book in the Crown series by historical

    The Chalice is the second book in the Crown series by historical fiction author Nancy Bilyeau that takes place during the reign of King Henry VIII. While I haven't yet read the first book in the series I can say that The Chalice can be read successfully as a standalone but it was so good I'm definitely going to have to borrow The Crown to get more of the author's writing.

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading The Chalice. Historical Fiction is one of my favourite genres so it was a real treat to be invited to join the tour for this novel. Rarely have I read a novel that brings this era of England's dark history to life in such a rich and imaginative way that is both captivating and depending on the scenes, disturbing and dark as well.

    While I read about Joanna's tale I became completely immersed in the story. For me if an author is able to suck me into the story from the very beginning like Nancy Bilyeau did while I read The Chalice that's a sing that she's an author to watch and after finishing this book I can honestly that Nancy Bilyeau can write anything and I'll read it.

    I loved the characters in The Chalice. Joanna is probably one of my top 5 favourite historical fiction heroines ever. Her intelligence, cunning, caring and kind personality really counter balanced the dark undertone of the novel. I was surprised to find that rather than use the side characters more as props to the story the author used them to their full potential making them all integral to the telling of the overall tale which I loved. I love when there's a rich variety of characters that have some real substance to them even if they're the bad guys.

    I also learned a lot about being a lady in waiting and the customs of going to court as well as other things about life during the tumultuous time period The Chalice was set in. You could tell right away that the author takes her craft seriously and you can tell that she's researched the time period thoroughly and that she has a great passion for her work. The amount of detail in the novel was fantastic and was neither too much or too little and I feel as though I learned something reading The Chalice which is not something you can say about just any novel.

    The story itself though blew me away. The amount of intrigue and betrayal is potent and the plots abound in The Chalice. While there is the brief mentioning of events that have taken place in the first book I didn't feel like they spoiled the first book for me and I'm glad that I was able to take part in the book tour for The Chalice.

    Overall, Nancy Bilyeau wrote a fantastic piece of historical fiction that is both lovely and brutal. I would recommend this book (and the first one even though I haven't had the pleasure of reading it yet) to anyone who loves historical fiction. This is a fantastic novel to read and will such you in from the first page.

    *I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my free and honest review. All thoughts and opinions expressed herein are 100% my own.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 3, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Fantastical historical fiction. When I first started this book,

    Fantastical historical fiction. When I first started this book, I thought it would be the other side of the story between the Catholic-Protestant issues of Henry VIII's reign because so many books cover the Protestant point of view.

    Then, the plot delves into a mystical plot revolving around a prophecy. The royal court makes brief appearances; many historical figures appear but most remain in the background.

    This series is a good follow-up to any series that delves into the historical events of the time but this book felt like (very well-done) fan-fic. I have no complaints with the writing itself, it's well-crafted but, in the end, I wish the story revolved more around the actual history and less around the magical plot to usurp Henry VIII.

    I received a free advanced uncorrected copy in exchange for a review and there were a couple of editing mishaps but they should be fixed in the final product.

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  • Posted November 28, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    This book encompasses some of the best historical characters, th

    This book encompasses some of the best historical characters, the Tudors of course, and their wicked dirty secrets. As King Henry has rid England of the filthy Catholic Church, Joanna is in turmoil as she tries to assimilate into the world, as the priories are now closed and her world is changing before she knows it. Of noble blood, she decides to settle in the small village of Dartford, where her two close friends, Brother Edmund, whom she is about to marry, and Constable Geoffrey reside. It isn’t long before her family shows their face and demands she return to her rightful position in court with false promises and brimming with deceit, betrayal, and ulterior motives. Being so naïve to this world she left behind, Joanna is swept into a world of spies, espionage, and treason, of people with their sights on restoring their faith in defiance of the hated King Henry. Joanna must successfully complete the three psychic seeings to help her save Christendom, thus filling her days with life endangering tasks.
    "The reckoning is coming," cried John. "Armageddon is at hand. In the end it will devour you all!"
    Does Joanna have the strength, knowledge, and courage to play out her role successfully and stay alive through all the grisly and darkened days before her? Be prepared to set enough time to read this book all the way through because once you pick it up, you won’t be able to put it back down. One of the best books on the Tudors I have read in a while for sure!
    *This book was provided in exchange for an honest review*   
    *You can view the original review at Musing with Crayolakym and San Francisco & Sacramento City Book Review

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  • Posted August 24, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I really wavered back and forth on whether I wanted to review t

    I really wavered back and forth on whether I wanted to review this one. I was a little worried that I hadn't read the first. Plus, I just wasn't sure about the synopsis. Eventually, Henry VIII won out. I couldn't miss out on a different viewpoint!
    I'm so glad I decided to give this book a shot. It was completely not what I expected. First off, very little of what I have read concerning Henry VIII's reign talked about the dissolution of the monasteries. We all know know about making himself the head of The Church of England, thus separating for the Roman Catholic Church. But, I was unfamiliar with the extent he went to eradicate all traces of the faith from England. The cost to all the people that called this institutions their home was tremendous. Not only were they cast out of their way of life, the often were ridiculed by the people.

    Joanna was an great lead character. She lead the life of a sister, but she never really stuck me as such. I think she took this path to hide herself from the eyes of the court. She's much to close to the throne and she wants to make sure that the King never sees her as a threat. However, it's been prophesied that she holds the key to restoring England to the Catholic faith. I was extremely curious how this played out with what I know of English history.

    It was most enlightening to read about a different side of England in this time period. How everyone watched over the shoulders unsure who would be the one to bring the noose down around their neck. The monarchy seemed to be the laughing stock to the rest of Europe but yet everybody was afraid to step in obviously. Henry VIII must have been an interesting man to be able to exert his control the way he did.

    The prophecy concerning Joanna and the return to the Catholic faith was interesting. I obviously knew that it wouldn't play out the way everybody kept thinking it would or it wouldn't stick to history very well. But, yet I found the way it did happen to be completely plausible and perfect. A very riveting book from beginning to end! Now I need to go back and read The Crown.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2013

    Recommended - interesting historical fiction

    I am coming to the conclusion of this book and it has interesting reading. A mystery based on England in the days of Henry the 8th.
    Definitely fiction but a good read

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  • Posted July 2, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Nancy Bilyeau in her new book, ¿The Chalice¿ Book Two in the Joa

    Nancy Bilyeau in her new book, “The Chalice” Book Two in the Joanna Stafford series published by Touchstone brings us another adventure with Joanna Stafford.




    From the back cover:   In the midst of England’s Reformation, a young novice will risk everything to defy the most powerful men of her era.




    In 1538, England’s bloody power struggle between crown and cross threatens to tear the country apart. Novice Joanna Stafford has tasted the wrath of the royal court, discovered what lies within the king’s torture rooms, and escaped death at the hands of those desperate to possess the power of an ancient relic.




    Even with all she has experienced, the quiet life is not for Joanna. Despite the possibilities of arrest and imprisonment, she becomes caught up in a shadowy international plot targeting Henry VIII himself. As the power plays turn vicious, Joanna realizes her role is more critical than she’d ever imagined. She must choose between those she loves most and assuming her part in a prophecy foretold by three seers. Repelled by violence, Joanna seizes a future with a man who loves her. But no matter how hard she tries, she cannot escape the spreading darkness of her destiny.




    To learn the final, sinister piece of the prophecy, she flees across Europe with a corrupt spy sent by Spain. As she completes the puzzle in the dungeon of a twelfth-century Belgian fortress, Joanna realizes the life of Henry VIII as well as the future of Christendom are in her hands—hands that must someday hold the chalice that lies at the center of these deadly prophecies. . . .




    Joanna Stafford is back and this adventure is even more dangerous than the first.  The quest is on!  It is a time of great religious upheaval.  King Henry Viii has ordered the Dissolution of the Monasteries.  Now England is torn between the new religion and the one they grew up with.  Joanna is drawn into a shadowy international plot against the King himself.  History, danger, mystery, action, adventure and thrills abound in “The Chalice”.  Certain characters are full of deceit so we know that there is much more to the story than what has been told Joanna.  However, we only know what Joanna knows as she finds out because the story is told in her first person viewpoint.  Get ready for a page-turning, thrill ride.  Ms. Bilyeau gets us caught up in the story and the characters lives to the point that we actually hate to say goodbye to them when the book ends.  I liked this book very much and look forward to the next adventure from the pen of Nancy Bilyeau.




    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Touchstone.   I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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