The Chance: A Novel

( 105 )

Overview

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Karen Kingsbury comes a heartwarming story about childhood friends, broken lives, and a long-ago promise that just might offer the hope of love for today.

The day before a teenage Ellie moved from Georgia to California, she and her best friend Nolan sat beneath the Spanish moss of an ancient oak tree where they wrote letters to each other and buried them in a rusty old metal box. The plan was to return eleven years later, dig the box up,...

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Overview

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Karen Kingsbury comes a heartwarming story about childhood friends, broken lives, and a long-ago promise that just might offer the hope of love for today.

The day before a teenage Ellie moved from Georgia to California, she and her best friend Nolan sat beneath the Spanish moss of an ancient oak tree where they wrote letters to each other and buried them in a rusty old metal box. The plan was to return eleven years later, dig the box up, and read the letters. But now, as that date approaches, much has changed. Ellie has abandoned the faith she grew up with, her days consumed with loving her little girl and trying to make ends meet. Sometimes she watches TV to catch a glimpse of her old friend Nolan, now an NBA star, whose faith is known by the entire nation. But few know that Nolan’s own personal tragedies have fueled both his faith and athletic drive. Despite his success, Nolan is isolated and lonely, plagued by a void in his heart that has remained since that night beneath the old oak tree with Ellie. For both Ellie and Nolan, the coming date is more than just a childhood promise. It’s the chance to make sense of it all—the chance to find out if it’s ever too late to find love again.

Karen Kingsbury weaves a moving tale of heart-wrenching loss, the power of faith, and the wounds that only a forever kind of love can heal. She delves deeply into a theme that resonates within us all: Hope lives for those willing to take a chance.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Kingsbury knows how to get down to business; readers start worrying from the opening sentence about 15-year-old Ellie Tucker and her family: "Her mom didn't come home for dinner, the third time that week." Family troubles prompt Ellie's abrupt move from Georgia to California, but before that happens she and her best friend Nolan write letters to one another that they bury and agree to unearth in 11 years. During that time, Ellie and Nolan naturally change, their paths diverging; he becomes an NBA star, she a single mother. Reckoning with loss and forgiveness for bad choices are required for healing. Kingsbury's themes are familiar, and her writing has benefited from a change of publisher. The action clips along, and readers root for the main characters. The fan-fic element of her writing remains- there's not only an NBA star but another celebrity affecting the action. But the author pours a fervent message about love and reconciliation into a novel that makes the lesson of hope go down much more easily than it would via sermon. Agent: Rick Christian, Alive Communications
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CBA Retailers and Resources
"Leaving is about families and relationships and the different kinds of 'leaving' that occur in life. Well-drawn characters and hometown stories make this another Kingsbury hit."
From the Publisher
"Another weeper from Christian-fiction diva Kingsbury, this time featuring a prayerful NBA star and his long-lost first love."

"In The Chance, Kingsbury (The Bridge, 2012) delivers another excellent novel filled with heart, adventure, and second chances. . . . Kingsbury is one of the most dependable names in inspirational fiction, and The Chance may be her best yet. She infuses such real emotion into her characters, readers will find themselves in tears multiple times throughout the novel. A beautiful balance of human fragility and the power of God’s grace makes this is a must-read."

"At age 15, Ellie finds her world turned upside down when her parents separate and her father moves them from Georgia to California. A devastated Ellie and her best friend, Nolan, write letters to each other and bury them beneath an oak tree. The two agree that in 11 years, no matter what surprises life brings, they will return and dig up the letters together. VERDICT Reminiscent of Nicholas Spark's The Notebook and Richard Paul Evan's The Walk, Kingsbury's (Coming Home) latest novel offers her characters forgiveness and love without an expiration date. Her many fans, and readers who like to escape their daily cares with a gentle Christian romance with elements of women's fiction, will enjoy the reappearances of Molly and Ryan, familiar characters from The Bridge, as well as a likable cast of fresh protagonists."

Kingsbury knows how to get down to business; readers start worrying from the opening sentence about 15-year-old Ellie Tucker and her family: "Her mom didn't come home for dinner, the third time that week." Family troubles prompt Ellie's abrupt move from Georgia to California, but before that happens she and her best friend Nolan write letters to one another that they bury and agree to unearth in 11 years. During that time, Ellie and Nolan naturally change, their paths diverging; he becomes an NBA star, she a single mother. Reckoning with loss and forgiveness for bad choices are required for healing. Kingsbury's themes are familiar, and her writing has benefited from a change of publisher. The action clips along, and readers root for the main characters. The fan-fic element of her writing remains— there's not only an NBA star but another celebrity affecting the action. But the author pours a fervent message about love and reconciliation into a novel that makes the lesson of hope go down much more easily than it would via sermon.

Booklist
"In The Chance, Kingsbury (The Bridge, 2012) delivers another excellent novel filled with heart, adventure, and second chances. . . . Kingsbury is one of the most dependable names in inspirational fiction, and The Chance may be her best yet. She infuses such real emotion into her characters, readers will find themselves in tears multiple times throughout the novel. A beautiful balance of human fragility and the power of God’s grace makes this is a must-read."
Library Journal
At age 15, Ellie finds her world turned upside down when her parents separate and her father moves them from Georgia to California. A devastated Ellie and her best friend, Nolan, write letters to each other and bury them beneath an oak tree. The two agree that in 11 years, no matter what surprises life brings, they will return and dig up the letters together. VERDICT Reminiscent of Nicholas Spark's The Notebook and Richard Paul Evan's The Walk, Kingsbury's (Coming Home) latest novel offers her characters forgiveness and love without an expiration date. Her many fans, and readers who like to escape their daily cares with a gentle Christian romance with elements of women's fiction, will enjoy the reappearances of Molly and Ryan, familiar characters from The Bridge, as well as a likable cast of fresh protagonists.—Julia M. Reffner, Fairport, NY
Kirkus Reviews
Another weeper from Christian-fiction diva Kingsbury, this time featuring a prayerful NBA star and his long-lost first love. Kingsbury appears to concede that a slavish adherence to the sterner side of Christianity can subvert that religion's founding principles, as happens when Alan Tucker, a Marine drill instructor, casts off his wife, Caroline, after discovering she is pregnant with a lover's child. Righteous though it may be, his implacable anger has ruinous long-term consequences. He immediately moves from Savannah to Camp Pendleton, San Diego, ostensibly to save teenage daughter Ellie from the shame of growing up near her disgraced mother and her illegitimate half sibling. (Abortion, of course, is never brought up, nor is the question of contraception.) Ellie is devastated: She'll leave behind Nolan, her closest childhood friend, a promising basketball player whose moves are described with a sportswriter's skill. The teenagers, both 15, are chastely awakening to love, and before Ellie departs, they bury letters confessing their true feelings under a favorite tree. They make a pact to return on June 1st, 11 years hence, to dig up the box and read the letters. Cut to the present. Caroline is raising her son, John, and writing weekly letters to Ellie, which go unanswered. Long estranged from Alan, Ellie has forsworn college, has an illegitimate child of her own, daughter Kinzie, and works as a beautician. Nolan, a superstar with the Atlanta Hawks, is far out of her league: There are paparazzi-perpetrated rumors of girlfriends galore. When Alan shows up to beg forgiveness for a shocking transgression, it's only Kinzie's faith that causes Ellie to relent. But as June 1st approaches, can she undo 11 years of miscommunication and bad luck? Since deus ex machina is Kingsbury's go-to plot device, nothing, particularly redemption, is left to chance. Unfortunately, putting everything in the Almighty's hands leaves mere mortals with little to do, which makes for tedious reading. Will appeal mainly to Kingsbury devotees, as well as lovers of religious tracts…and basketball.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781451672985
  • Publisher: Howard Books
  • Publication date: 9/3/2013
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 89,471
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Karen Kingsbury

#1 New York Times bestselling novelist Karen Kingsbury is America’s favorite inspirational storyteller, with more than 20 million copies of her award-winning books in print. Her last dozen books have topped bestseller charts and many of her novels are under development as major motion pictures. Karen lives in Tennessee with her husband Don and their five sons, three of whom are adopted from Haiti. Their actress daughter Kelsey is married to Christian recording artist Kyle Kupecky.

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Read an Excerpt

The Chance


  • Summer 2002

Her mom didn’t come home for dinner—the third time that week.

That was the first hint Ellie Tucker had that maybe her father was right. Maybe her mother had done something so terrible this time that their family really would break in two. And no one and nothing would ever put them back together.

Ellie was fifteen that hot, humid Savannah summer, and as the Friday afternoon hours slipped away, as six o’clock became six thirty, she joined her dad in the kitchen and helped him make dinner. Tuna sandwiches with a new jar of mayonnaise, warm from the cupboard. They worked without talking, her mother’s absence weighing heavy in the silence of the passing minutes. The refrigerator didn’t have much, but her dad found a bag of baby carrots and put them in a bowl. When the food was on the table, he took his spot at the head, and Ellie sat next to him.

The place across from her, the spot where her mother usually sat, remained glaringly empty.

“Let’s pray.” Her father took her hand. He waited for several beats before starting. “Lord, thank You for our food and our blessings.” He hesitated. “You know all things. Reveal the truth, please. In Jesus’ name, amen.”

The truth? Ellie could barely swallow the dry bites of her sandwich. The truth about what? Her mother? The reason she wasn’t home when the doctor’s office she worked at closed an hour ago? No words were said during the meal, though the quiet screamed across the dinner table. When they were finished, her dad looked at her. His eyes were sad. “Ellie, if you would do the dishes, please.” He stood and kissed her on the forehead. “I’ll be in my room.”

She did what she was asked. Twenty minutes later, she was still finishing when she heard her mom slip through the front door. Ellie looked over her shoulder, and their eyes met. Lately, Ellie felt more like the mother, the way a mother might feel when her kids were teenagers. Her mom wore her work clothes, black pants and a white shirt. As if work had just now gotten done.

“Where’s your father?” Her mother’s eyes were red and swollen, her voice thick.

“In his room.” Ellie blinked, not sure what else to say.

Her mom started walking in that direction; then she stopped and turned to Ellie again. “I’m sorry.” Her shoulders dropped a little. “For missing dinner.” She sounded like someone Ellie didn’t know. “I’m sorry.”

Before Ellie could ask where she’d been, her mom turned and walked down the hall. Ellie checked the clock on the microwave. Seven thirty. Nolan had another hour in the gym, another hour shooting baskets. Then Ellie would ride her bike to his house, the way she did most nights. Especially this summer.

Since her parents had started fighting.

She dried her hands, went to her room, and shut the door behind her. A little music and some time with her journal, then Nolan would be home. She turned on the radio. Backstreet Boys filled the air, and instantly, she dropped the sound a few notches. Her dad said he’d take away her radio if she listened to worldly music. Ellie figured worldly was a matter of opinion. Her opinion was the Backstreet Boys’ music might be as close to heaven as she was going to get in the near future.

The boys were singing about being larger than life when the first shout seemed to rattle her bedroom window. Ellie killed the sound on the radio and jumped to her feet. As much tension as there had been between her parents lately, neither of them ever really shouted. Not like this. Her heart pounded loud enough to hear it. She hurried to her bedroom door, but before she reached it another round of shouts echoed through the house. This time she could understand what her father was saying, the awful names he was calling her mom.

Moving as quietly as she could, Ellie crept down the hall and across the living room closer to her parents’ bedroom door. Another burst of yelling and she was near enough to hear something else. Her mother was weeping.

“You’ll pack your things and leave.” Her father had never sounded like this—like he was firing bullets with every word. He wasn’t finished. “I will not have you pregnant with his child and . . . and living under my roof.” His voice seemed to shake the walls. “I will not have it.”

Ellie anchored herself against the hallway so she wouldn’t drop to the floor. What was happening? Her mother was pregnant? With someone else’s baby? She felt the blood leaving her face, and her world started to spin. Colors and sounds and reality blurred, and she wondered if she would pass out. Run, Ellie . . . run fast. She ordered herself to move, but her feet wouldn’t follow the command.

Before she could figure out which way was up, her father opened the door and glared at her, his chest heaving. “What are you doing?”

The question stood between them. Ellie looked past him to her mom, sitting in the bedroom chair, her head in her hands. Get up, Ellie wanted to scream at her. Tell him it’s a lie! Defend yourself, Mom! Do something. But her mother did nothing. She said nothing.

Ellie’s eyes flew to her father again, and she tried to step away, tried to exit the scene as quickly as possible, but she tripped and fell back on her hands. Pain cut through her wrists, but she moved farther away from him. Like a crab escaping a net.

It took that long for her father’s expression to soften. “Ellie. I’m sorry.” He stepped toward her. “I didn’t mean for . . . You weren’t supposed to hear that.”

And in that moment Ellie knew two things. First, the horrible words her dad had shouted through the house were true. And second, her life as she knew it was over. It lay splintered on the worn-out hallway carpet in a million pieces. She scrambled to her feet and turned away. “I . . . I have to go.”

Her father was saying something about how this was more than a girl her age could understand and how she needed to get back to her room and pray. But all Ellie could hear was the way her heart slammed around in her chest. She needed air, needed to breathe. In a move that felt desperate, she found her way to her feet and ran for the front door. A minute later she was on her bicycle, pedaling as fast as she could through the summer night.

He would still be at the gym, but that was okay. Ellie loved watching Nolan play basketball. Loved it whether the place was packed with kids from Savannah High or it was just the two of them and the echo of the ball hitting the shiny wood floor. With every push of the bike pedal, Ellie tried to put the reality out of her mind. But the truth smothered her like a wet blanket. Her mother had come home late again—the way she’d been coming home late since early spring. And today . . . today she must have admitted what Ellie’s dad had suspected all along.

Her mom had been having an affair. Not only that, but she was pregnant.

The truth churned in Ellie’s stomach, suffocating her until finally she had no choice but to ditch her bike in the closest bush and give way to the stomachache consuming her. One disgusting wave after another emptied her insides until only the hurt remained. A hurt that she already knew would stay with her forever.

Exhausted and drained, Ellie sat on the curb, head in her hands, and let the tears come. Until then, shock had kept the sadness pushed to the corner of her heart. Now she cried until she could barely breathe. Her mom didn’t love her father, which meant she didn’t love either of them. She wanted more than Ellie and her dad. There was no other way to look at it. Shame added itself to the mix of emotions because Nolan’s mom never would have done something like this.

Ellie lifted her face to the darkening sky. Nolan. She wiped her face and inhaled deeply. She needed to get to him before it got any later, needed to find him before he left the gym. Her bike was old and the chain was loose, but that didn’t stop her from reaching the school in record time. The sound of the ball hitting the floor soothed her soul as she rode to the back door of the gym. She leaned her bike against the brick wall next to his.

Nolan kept the door propped open in case a breeze came up. Ellie slipped through the entrance and took a spot on the first row of the bleachers. He caught the ball and stared at her, his eyes dancing, a smile tugging at his lips. “You’re early.”

She nodded. She didn’t trust her voice, not when all she wanted was to cry.

A shadow of concern fell over his tanned face. “Ellie? You okay?”

No one could take away the pain like he could, her best friend, Nolan Cook. But as much as she wanted his comfort and understanding, she didn’t want him to know. Didn’t want to tell him why she was upset, because then, well, for sure it would be true. There would be no denying the truth once she told Nolan.

He set down the ball and walked to her. Sweat dripped from his forehead, and his tank top and shorts were damp. “You were crying.” He stopped a foot from her. “What happened?”

“My parents.” She felt her eyes well up, felt her words drown in an ocean of sadness.

“More fighting?”

“Yeah. Bad.”

“Ahh, Ellie.” His breathing was returning to normal. He wiped his forearm across his face. “I’m sorry.”

“Keep playing.” Even to her own ears, her voice sounded strained from all she wasn’t saying. She nodded toward the basket. “You have another half hour.”

He watched her for a long couple of seconds. “You sure?”

“We can talk later. I just . . .” A few rebel tears slid down her cheeks. “I needed to be here. With you.”

Again he narrowed his eyes, worried. Eventually, he gave a slow nod, not quite sure. “We can leave whenever you want.”

“When you’re done. Please, Nolan.”

A last look into her eyes, then he turned and jogged back to the ball. Once it was in his hands, he dribbled right and then left and took it to the hoop. In a move as fluid and graceful as anything Ellie had learned in her three years of dance, Nolan rose in the air and slammed the ball through the net. He landed lightly on both feet and caught the ball. Dribbled back out, juked a few imaginary opponents, and repeated the move. Ten straight dunks and he jogged to the drinking fountain and drank for half a minute. Next it was three-point shots.

Nolan played basketball with his heart and mind and soul. The ball was an extension of his hand, and every move, every step, was as natural for him as breathing. Watching him, Ellie felt her eyes dry, felt herself celebrating his gift of playing basketball, the way she celebrated it every time she had the privilege of seeing him play. Nolan’s dream was as simple as it was impossible.

He wanted to play in the NBA. It was something he prayed about and worked toward every day. Every hour of every day. From the A’s and B’s he struggled to earn to the long hours he put in here each night. If Nolan didn’t wind up playing professional basketball, it wouldn’t be for lack of trying or believing.

When he’d sunk five shots from spots all along the arch of the three-point line, he ran to the water fountain once more and then tucked the ball under his arm and walked back to her. He used his shirt to wipe the sweat off his face. “Could it be more humid?”

“Yeah.” She smiled a little and looked at the open back door. “Not much of a breeze.”

“No.” He nodded to her. “Come on. Let’s go to my house. I’ll shower, and then we can go to the park.”

That was all Ellie wanted, a few hours alone with Nolan at Gordonston Park. The place where they had their favorite oak tree and enough soft grass to lie on their backs and count shooting stars on summer nights like this one. She still didn’t say anything, not yet. They walked silently out the back door, and Nolan locked it. His dad was the Savannah High coach, and he had given his son a key a year ago. Too much trouble to open the gym every time Nolan wanted to shoot.

They rode their bikes to Pennsylvania Avenue and took the shortcut down Kinzie to Edgewood. Nolan’s house was only half a mile from Ellie’s, but they might as well have been in separate worlds for how different the neighborhoods were. His had fireflies and perfect front lawns that stretched on forever. Ellie’s had chain-link fences and stray dogs, single-story houses the size of Nolan’s garage.

The sort of house Ellie and her parents lived in.

She sat with Nolan’s mother in the kitchen while he showered. Ellie’s eyes were dry now, so she didn’t have to explain herself. The conversation was light, with Nolan’s mom talking about the new Bible study she’d joined and how much she was learning.

Ellie wanted to care, wanted to feel as connected to God as Nolan and his parents were. But if God loved her, why was her life falling apart? Maybe He only loved some people. Good folks, like the Cook family. A few minutes later, Nolan came down in fresh shorts and a T-shirt. He grabbed two chocolate chip cookies from a plate on the kitchen counter and kissed his mother’s cheek.

Ellie blinked, and she realized, as she’d been doing a lot lately, that Nolan was growing up. They’d been friends since second grade, and they’d walked home together since the first day of middle school. But somewhere along the journey of time, they’d both done something they hadn’t seen coming.

They’d gotten older. They weren’t kids anymore.

Nolan was six-one already, tanned from his morning runs, his blond hair cut close to his head the way it was every summer. He’d been lifting weights, so maybe that was it. The way his shoulders and arms looked muscled in the pale green T-shirt as he grabbed the cookies.

Ellie felt her cheeks grow hot, and she looked away. It was weird seeing Nolan like this, more man than boy. His mother turned to her and smiled, warm and genuine. “Come by anytime, Ellie. The door’s always open. You know that.”

“Yes, ma’am. Thank you.”

Ellie and Nolan didn’t talk about where they were going. Their spot was the same every time. The patch of grass, alongside the biggest oak tree in the park—maybe the biggest in the city. The one dripping with Spanish moss, with gnarled old roots big enough to sit on. They walked side by side to the spot.

Ellie and Nolan had come here to talk about life since the summer before sixth grade. Back then they played hide-and-seek among the trees, with the enormous oak serving as home base. During the school year, when it was warm enough, they’d do their homework here. And on nights like this, they would do what came easiest for them.

They would simply crack open their hearts and share whatever came out.

“Okay. Tell me.” Nolan took the spot closest to the massive tree trunk. He leaned back, studying her. “What happened?”

Ellie had been thinking about this moment since she walked through the door of the high school gym. She had to tell him, because she told him everything. But maybe she didn’t have to tell him this very minute. Her throat felt dry, so her words took longer to form. “My mom . . . she came home late again.”

He waited, and after a few seconds, he blinked. “That’s it?”

“Yeah.” She hated postponing the truth, but she couldn’t tell him yet. “My dad was really mad.”

He leaned back against the tree. “It’ll blow over.”

“Right.” She moved to the spot beside him and pressed her back lightly against the tree trunk. Their shoulders touched, a reminder of everything good and real in her life.

“One day when we’re old and married, we’ll come back to this very spot and remember this summer.”

“How do you know?”

He looked at her. “That we’ll remember?”

“No.” She grinned. “That I’ll marry you.”

“That’s easy.” He faced her and shrugged. “You’ll never find anyone who loves you like I do.”

It wasn’t the first time he’d said it. He kept his tone light, so she couldn’t accuse him of being too serious or trying to change things between them. She would laugh and shake her head, as if he’d suggested something crazy, like the two of them running off and joining the circus.

This time she didn’t laugh. She only lifted her eyes to the distant trees and the fireflies dancing among them. Good thing she hadn’t told him about her mother, about how she’d run off with another man and gotten pregnant. That would change everything. Nolan would feel sorry for her, and there would be no more teasing about marriage. Not when her parents had made such a mess of theirs.

Ellie exhaled, hating her new reality. Yes, the news could wait.

Right now she wanted nothing more than to sit here beside Nolan Cook under the big oak tree at the edge of the park on a summer night that was theirs alone and believe . . . believe for one more moment the thing Ellie wanted more than her next breath.

That they might stay this way forever.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 105 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(64)

4 Star

(20)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(9)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 105 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 20, 2013

    A nice, chaste novel and makes you want to believe in a better f

    A nice, chaste novel and makes you want to believe in a better future.

    Having browsed only the summary, and being in the mood for a love story, I did not notice it was a "Christian novel".

    Honestly, this is not a genre I read spontaneously. Often, the moral lessons taught disturb my reading and make it less fluid. Why? Because in France, we are less accustomed to speaking openly about religion, politics and money than across the Atlantic. Everyone's beliefs are a private matter.
    In this type of novel, I am led to think and compare my views, my education and my cultural differences at the same time I read.

    Attention, I took great pleasure in the messages full of hope that the author sprinkled in her adventure.
    And as the end is happy, it gives a fairy tale of modern times dimension. This is very nice, very chaste and makes you want to believe in a better future.

    Thus, Ellie and Nolan are separated by life. Adolescents, they can not go against the obstacles that fate puts on their way up and even though they love each other deeply, they lose sight for eleven years. 

    In the background, the author tells of the difficulties of being a married couple and the daily involvement of the choices that reflected on an entire family.

    Anyway, Ellie does not have all the cards in her hands to continue to believe. Moreover the decisions taken by her parents have a direct impact on her adult hapiness.
    As for Nolan, a tragedy has deeply marked him but also gives him the strength to pursue his dreams.
    After eleven years of separation and lives diametrically opposed, fate is knocking miraculously on their doors.

    Much hope is putting in this romance. The author also discusses the importance of forgiveness and continue to believe despite the difficulties. Karen Kingsbury has a way to make the reader turn the pages eagerly and makes you want to hope ...

    Lucie
    newbooksonmyselves.blogspot.fr

    9 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2013

    The chance!!!!

    I love this story!! I honestly felt for awhile that karen's books were missing something but i never gave up.. the bridge and the chance i feel more god than in her past series... so glad that she seems to have listened to what her readers were saying and the story god truly wanted her to write...

    This is a story about a young girl of fifteen and her best friend nolan who loved one another so much .. then one day her parents split up and ellie had to move far awy frim savannah but before doing so nolan and ellie go to the park and write letters to one another that must nit be opened for 11 years..... find out what god has planned for them in this new release by karen kingsbury

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2013

    Can not go wrong with this book or any of Karen Kingsbury.

    This story will touch your heart and soul. Reminds you that God has a special person for each of us maybe as a dear friend or as a spouse.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 26, 2013

    I absolutely loved the story

    I have read most of Karen Kingsbury books. What a blessing to read without all that bad language that seems to have no meaning in a novel.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2013

    Read this book in a day. You just can't but it down, I love Kare

    Read this book in a day. You just can't but it down, I love Karen Kingsbury she has a heart of gold and pours into all of her books. She makes you walk with the lord in this books and all of her books.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2013

    Very good!

    I recomend this book to fellow christians, and others that wonder what it is like in the footsteps of god.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2014

    Very disappointed

    I've read two of her stand alone books and cried my eyes out. So i was looking forward to this one. As the wife of a retired Marine, I was very disappointed to see that she obviously did no research. It's very unrealistic. Nothing adds up. By the time he's working at the brig, he'd have been in for 28 years. Most retire at 20. And none that senior would be doing such menial work. Regular hours on drill instructor duty?! My kids moved four times between 3rd grade and high school. I realize she's writing to a general audience, but if you're going to include the military, make it more realistic. One more thing, members of the Marine Corps are not soldiers, they are marines!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2014

    Book is preachy and bad

    Dont bother with this one

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2013

    Highly recommended.

    Karen Kingsbury is one of the best Christian writers of our time. She is clear and very easy to understand and a delight to read. You will love her books as well as respect the writer.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2013

    Highly Recommended

    Karen Kingsbury has once again written a book that touches the heart in ways that can be applied to our own lives. Love her books and can hardly wait for the next one.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2013

    A MUST READ

    I love all of Karen Kingsbury's books, and this one was no acception!
    It was a bit slow starting out, but got to a point where I just couldn't put it down. I've read all of Karen's books to date, and can't wait for the next one to come out.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2013

    Outstanding book, You must read it.

    I just finished this book and had a hard time putting it down to sleep or work. It was compelling.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 27, 2014

    Inspirational! Another good Karen Kingsbury book.

    I enjoyed the story very much.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2014

    Highly Recommended

    I loved this book. It kept my interest through out.

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  • Posted June 27, 2014

    Too much for me

    While I am a committed Christian, this story is just a little too much for me. Maybe some lives are like the ones in this story, but I do not know these people. I seldom drop a book I purchased, I could not finish this one.

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  • Posted June 27, 2014

    Enjoyable story

    I enjoyed the storyline and loved the characters. I know it's Christian lit; however, I was put off by too many prayers.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2014

    Great story

    Very heartwarming story as all her books are! It will keep you up till your finished!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2014

    Nice read

    I try to read all of Karen's books. This one was not a "hard to put down book" but I did finish it and enjoyed it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2014

    A very sweet story with believable characters. A reminder of the

    A very sweet story with believable characters. A reminder of the power of forgiveness and faith.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2014

    Nothing special.

    Easy to guess plot and minimal character developmeny

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