The Changing Nature of Nursing in a Managerial Age / Edition 1

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Overview

As an occupation, nursing is perceived by some as an emergent profession and by others as a managed service. For the former group, the key to quality improvement in nursing is to develop and promote that professionalism. For the latter group, the success of nursing as an occupation depends on its ability to colonise senior positions within the management hierarchy of health services.

This text takes a fresh view on the debate at the heart of nursing. It considers the future for nursing within health care and social care and how it needs to adjust to its changing status and power in the context of social and health policy.

The book is organised into four sections. The first sets forth an ideal vision of nursing as a profession with 'caring' as its core feature. The second section outlines threats to nursing as a caring profession posed by a managerial agenda within health care and social care services. The third and fourth sections reconsider the ideals and realities of professional nursing in the context of managerialism and the changing culture of health care provision.

This book makes a major contribution to current thinking about the nature of nursing as an occupation and its relevance and particular contribution to human well being. It should find a wide and appreciative audience among nurses and students, as well as other health care and social care professionals, and those involved in health service planning.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Mary Ellen Wurzbach, RN, MSN, PhD (University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh)
Description: This book is an historical and contemporary analysis of the development of nursing in Great Britain from Nightingale to the present. The emphasis is on contemporary changes occurring in British nursing today which seem to pit a philosophy of professionalism against a philosophy of "managerialism." Managerialism is most akin to nurses as case managers within a managed care environment in this country.
Purpose: The editors make an attempt to capture and hold up to scrutiny a number of different influences on nursing that stem from the nature of British healthcare organizations where nurses are employed and the views of British society about nursing roles in a contemporary world. They explore the issue of professionalism versus managerialism in a constructive way so that nurses and health service managers might consider the potential benefits and possible difficulties in steering British nursing in either direction, or the merger of both in a different way.
Audience: The book would be very valuable for nurses in diverse practice areas and at diverse educational levels in Britain. The chapters on caring would be interesting for nurse theorists and graduate students of nursing theory in the U.S., and there are other chapters for nurses interested in or who teach courses about international healthcare.
Features: Two competing philosophies — not only of nursing but also healthcare — are discussed. Many of the concerns experienced by nurses in the U.S. (but going by different names) are analyzed, including managed care, advanced practice nursing, patient-centered care, professionalism, and caring. The unique feature of the book is the in-depth analysis of the development of nursing in Britain.
Assessment: This text is an excellent overview of the development of nursing in Britain. The chapters on caring can be appreciated across national boundaries. I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in the politics of nursing in Great Britain.
From the Publisher
It brings us right up-to-date with the changing power bases brought about by the introduction of primary care groups and clinical governance.

Any nurse, midwife or health visitor who has spent the past few years experiencing rather than analysing the changing nature of their jobs will find lots to identify with here. Students should find it a very useful resource. And managers and health service planners who would like to - or perhaps need to - know how nursing and nurses tick would do well to give this their attention.

Health Service Journal

Mary Ellen Wurzbach
This book is an historical and contemporary analysis of the development of nursing in Great Britain from Nightingale to the present. The emphasis is on contemporary changes occurring in British nursing today which seem to pit a philosophy of professionalism against a philosophy of ""managerialism."" Managerialism is most akin to nurses as case managers within a managed care environment in this country. The editors make an attempt to capture and hold up to scrutiny a number of different influences on nursing that stem from the nature of British healthcare organizations where nurses are employed and the views of British society about nursing roles in a contemporary world. They explore the issue of professionalism versus managerialism in a constructive way so that nurses and health service managers might consider the potential benefits and possible difficulties in steering British nursing in either direction, or the merger of both in a different way. The book would be very valuable for nurses in diverse practice areas and at diverse educational levels in Britain. The chapters on caring would be interesting for nurse theorists and graduate students of nursing theory in the U.S., and there are other chapters for nurses interested in or who teach courses about international healthcare. Two competing philosophies—not only of nursing but also healthcare—are discussed. Many of the concerns experienced by nurses in the U.S. (but going by different names) are analyzed, including managed care, advanced practice nursing, patient-centered care, professionalism, and caring. The unique feature of the book is the in-depth analysis of the development of nursing in Britain. This text is anexcellent overview of the development of nursing in Britain. The chapters on caring can be appreciated across national boundaries. I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in the politics of nursing in Great Britain.
Booknews
Considers the future of nursing within health and social care and how it needs to adjust to its changing status in the context of new policy. Sets out an ideal vision of nursing as a profession with caring as its core feature, then outlines threats to nursing as a caring profession posed by a managerial agenda within health and social care services, and reconsiders the ideals of professional nursing in the context of managerialism and the changing culture of health care provision. Norman teaches nursing and interdisciplinary care at King's College London. Cowley teaches community practice development at the same institution. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

4 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780632042524
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 9/15/1999
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 196
  • Product dimensions: 6.18 (w) x 9.22 (h) x 0.57 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface; List of Contributors; Section 1 - Setting the scene: Nursing in a managerial age; Section 2 - Nursing the ideal: Idealised caring: the heart of nursing; An analysis of caring; Section 3 - Nursing in a Managerial Age: The growth of managerialism and its impact on nursing and the NHS; Nursing skill: potential or dilution; The organisation of nursing work; Education for nursing: preparation for professional practice; Section 4 - Nursing the reality: Nursing as caring revisited; Opportunities in a managerial age; Index.

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