The Changing Profile of Autopsied Deaths in the United States, 1972–2007

The Changing Profile of Autopsied Deaths in the United States, 1972–2007

by Donna L. Hoyert
     
 

An autopsy, the medical examination of a deceased person, may confirm
clinical findings, provide more complete information to describe cause of
death, or uncover conditions not recognized clinically prior to death (1). Two
types are performed in the United States: a) hospital or clinical autopsies,
which family or physicians request to clarify cause of… See more details below

Overview

An autopsy, the medical examination of a deceased person, may confirm
clinical findings, provide more complete information to describe cause of
death, or uncover conditions not recognized clinically prior to death (1). Two
types are performed in the United States: a) hospital or clinical autopsies,
which family or physicians request to clarify cause of death or assess care,
and b) medicolegal autopsies, which legal officials order to further investigate
the circumstances surrounding a death (2). The autopsy rate, or percentage
of deaths that received this final assessment, was stable from the 1950s until
the beginning of the 1970s, when the autopsy rate began to decrease (3). This
report uses mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS)
over a 35-year period to examine changes in the autopsy rate and in the
distribution of those autopsied by age and cause. Variation in autopsy patterns
has implications for which deaths may have a more complete and conclusive
cause-of-death determination.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013879096
Publisher:
The Delano Max Wealth Institute, LLC.
Publication date:
12/12/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

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