The Happiest Toddler on the Block: The New Way to Stop the Daily Battle of Wills and Raise a Secure and Well-Behaved One- to Four-Year-Old

Overview

Toddlers can drive you bonkers…so adorable and fun one minute…so stubborn and demanding the next! Yet, as unbelievable as it sounds, there is a way to turn the daily stream of “nos” and “don’ts” into “yeses” and hugs…if you know how to speak your toddler’s language. In one of the most useful advances in parenting techniques of the past twenty-five years, Dr. Karp reveals that toddlers, with their immature brains and stormy outbursts, should be thought of not as pint-size people ...
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Overview

Toddlers can drive you bonkers…so adorable and fun one minute…so stubborn and demanding the next! Yet, as unbelievable as it sounds, there is a way to turn the daily stream of “nos” and “don’ts” into “yeses” and hugs…if you know how to speak your toddler’s language. In one of the most useful advances in parenting techniques of the past twenty-five years, Dr. Karp reveals that toddlers, with their immature brains and stormy outbursts, should be thought of not as pint-size people but as pintsize…cavemen.

Having noticed that the usual techniques often failed to calm crying toddlers, Dr. Karp discovered that the key to effective communication was to speak to them in their own primitive language. When he did, suddenly he was able to soothe their outbursts almost every time! This amazing success led him to the realization that children between the ages of one and four go through four stages of “evolutionary” growth, each linked to the development of the brain, and each echoing a step in prehistoric humankind’s journey to civilization:

• The “Charming Chimp-Child” (12 to 18 months): Wobbles around on two legs, grabs everything in reach, plays a nonstop game of “monkey see monkey do.”
• The “Knee-High Neanderthal” (18 to 24 months): Strong-willed, fun-loving, messy, with a vocabulary of about thirty words, the favorites being “no” and “mine.”
• The “Clever Caveman” (24 to 36 months):
Just beginning to learn how to share, make friends, take turns, and use the potty.
• The “Versatile Villager” (36 to 48 months): Loves to tell stories, sing songs and dance, while trying hard to behave.

To speak to these children, Dr. Karp has developed two extraordinarily effective techniques:
1) The “fast food” rule—restating what your child has said to make sure you got it right;
2) The four-step rule—using gesture, repetition, simplicity, and tone to help your irate Stone-Ager be happy again.

Once you’ve mastered “toddler-ese,” you will be ready to apply behavioral techniques specific to each stage of your child’s development, such as teaching patience and calm, doing time-outs (and time-ins), praise through “gossiping,” and many other strategies. Then all the major challenges of the toddler years—including separation anxiety, sibling rivalry, toilet training, night fears, sleep problems, picky eating, biting and hitting, medicine taking can be handled in a way that will make your toddler feel understood. The result: fewer tantrums, less yelling, and, best of all, more happy, loving time for you and your child.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
There's not a parent on earth who can deny the lure of this book's subtitle. That's because we all know that even the most lovable toddler can drive us bonkers. In The Happiest Toddler on the Block, pediatrician Harvey Karp reminds parents that the real key to child contentment is good communication. He explains that toddlers go through four stages of "evolutionary" growth, each linked to a phase in the brain's development, each requiring specific behavioral techniques. Written in an engaging style, this book teaches parents the languages of their little "Stone-Agers," "Charming Chimp Children," and "Versatile Villagers."
Publishers Weekly
California-based pediatrician Karp offers a unique approach to the tantrums, melt-downs and overriding challenges that often accompany the demanding years from one to four. Viewing toddlers as primitive thinkers akin to prehistoric man, Karp divides his patients into developmental groups: the "Charming Chimp-Child" (12 to 18 months), the "Knee-High Neanderthal" (18 to 24 months), the "Clever Cave-Kid" (24 to 36 months) and the "Versatile Villager" (36 to 48 months). Parents may find the toddler years so frustrating, Karp suggests, because they don't speak their child's language. To deal effectively with the undeveloped brains of toddlers, one must understand "Toddler-ese," he says, a method of talking to youngsters that employs short phrases, repetition, a dramatic tone of voice and the use of body language. Although the author admits parents may feel foolish speaking in this manner, he nevertheless maintains that the approach soothes children by respecting their needs. Additionally, Karp offers suggestions for positive discipline (e.g., loss of privileges and time out) and guides parents through early expected milestones, while acknowledging that a child's individual temperament (e.g., easy, cautious, spirited) will uniquely influence the pace of his or her development. While some readers may find the relentless cave-kid metaphors irksome, Karp's gentle, easygoing tone is soothing and offers new hope and strategies to those who may have given up on making sense of the toddler years. Agent, Suzanne Gluck. (Mar.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Pediatrician Karp (The Happiest Baby on the Block) here offers practical advice for parents struggling to handle their toddler's never-ending tantrums and mood swings. He compares the toddler's curiosity, fears, and stubbornness to those of prehistoric humans in a manner that is lighthearted yet quite sincere. Starting with the premise that "as your child develops, from conception to adulthood, she will mirror many of the characteristics of our ancient ancestors as they slowly evolved into modern humans," Karp divides toddlerhood into four "evolutionary stages": "Charming Chimp-Child" (12 to 18 months), "Knee-High Neanderthal" (18 to 24 months), "Clever Cave-Kid" (24 to 36 months), and "Versatile Villager" (36 to 48 months). After explaining the similarities between each stage and its evolutionary counterpart in Part 1, Karp goes on to advise parents on dealing with toddlers in light of this new perspective. The key to effective communication, he says, is to speak in toddlers' own "prehistoric" language, which means that parents must often restate what their toddler has said to make sure they got it right; they must also use "gesture, repetition, simplicity, and tone" to help soothe the toddler's tension. Even though the prehistoric metaphor is occasionally overdone, the advice is both refreshing and sound. Recommended for all collections on early childhood.-Kay Hogan Smith, Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham Lib., Lister Hill Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402594311
  • Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC
  • Publication date: 3/1/2004
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged, 8 CDs, 9 hrs.
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 5.78 (h) x 1.04 (d)

Meet the Author

Harvey Karp
Harvey Karp, M.D., is an assistant professor of pediatrics at the UCLA School of Medicine, with a private practice in Santa Monica. Author of The Happiest Baby on the Block, Dr. Karp is a nationally renowned expert in child development, children’s health and the environment, and breast-feeding. He lives with his wife and daughter in California.

For further information and for information about the award-winning The Happiest Baby DVD/video and The Happiest Toddler DVD/video, please visit www.thehappiestbaby.com.

Paula Spencer is a freelance writer whose eight books include The V Book and Momfidence!: An Oreo Never Killed Anybody and Other Secrets of Happier Parenting. Author of the “Momfidence!” column in Woman’s Day, she is also a contributing editor to Parenting and Baby Talk. She lives with her husband and four children in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

"Help! There's a Neanderthal in My Kitchen!"

"A first step is like watching the history of human civilization from small fishy things to Neanderthals unravel in one instant before your eyes."

-Anna Quindlen and Nick Kelsh, Naked BabiesMain Points:

All parents find toddlerhood challenging.

Parenting tips that work with older children often fail miserably with toddlers.

As your toddler grows, you are watching five million years of humanity unfold before your very eyes.

Toddlers pass through four stages of development that echo the evolution of our ancient ancestors.

Prehistoric Parenting: How to become the perfect ambassador to your little Stone Ager.

In the Beginning . . .

Tara, 14 months old, is proud of her newfound ability to walk. She tries to practice it every chance she gets. But right now she's confined to an exam room with me and her mom, Simone. Tara toddles over to the door. "Unghh!" She grunts reaching for the door-knob. "Unghh! Unghh!" She pushes against the closed door. Now she turns a pleading eye to me and starts slapping the door. She wants out!

Simone responds, "No, sweetheart. I know you want to leave, but we have to stay here a little longer. Let's look at this pretty book."

Tara's mom has lovingly acknowledged her daughter's feelings (a common parenting tip) and tried a favorite distraction (another good idea). This time, however, her efforts are rewarded with a crumpled red face, an open mouth . . . and . . . a long shrill scream that could shatter glass!

Taken aback by the tantrum's ferocity, her mom tries to engage her by heartily singing "The Itsy Bitsy Spider." Tara screams louder. So Simone decides to set a limit. "Tara! No screaming! Shhh. Stop or we'll have to leave, okay?" But by now Tara is in a full-scale meltdown. Embarrassed-and annoyed-Simone offers me an apology and hoists her little volcano over her shoulder; avoiding the stares of the other parents in the waiting room, she hurries to the exit.

Have you experienced your toddler's first temper tantrum yet?

Has your child discovered the word "No!"?

Do you get ambushed by fights that rise out of nowhere?

Are you mentally exhausted from shouting "Don't pull that!" and "Stop, now!"?

Parenting a toddler is filled with thrills and simple joys, but for most of us, it's also filled with the most difficult challenges we will encounter until the teen years. (No wonder it's often called "the first adolescence.")

Loving parents just like you have been scratching their heads for generations, wondering (and asking their pediatricians): What makes toddlers act the way they do? Why are they so unreasonable and tough to discipline?

I'm going to answer those questions for you. Better yet, I'll show you the way to a calmer toddler and a less-stressed household. But first it helps to see . . . the big picture.

Ah-ha! A New View of Toddlers

"A mind once stretched to a new idea never returns to its original size."

-Oliver Wendell Holmes

Until recently people mistakenly thought that babies cried because of terrible stomach pain. Then my book The Happiest Baby on the Block came along and revealed that newborns really cry because they need help turning on their "calming reflex." (Ah-ha!)

With toddlers, the "ah-ha" realization that perfectly explains their perplexing behavior is that these sweet kids, the apples of our eyes, are actually little Neanderthals!

Okay, okay. I've had more than one parent look at me strangely when I've said that. Please don't take the comparison as an insult. Allow me to explain how this new way of thinking will become your magic window for understanding what goes on in your toddler's mind-and help you turn conflict into cooperation in minutes-or less!

"The Little Adult Assumption": A Common Mistake

Recently John, a dad in my practice, said to me jokingly, "My toddler is a completely different animal than she was as a baby!" John was more on target than he knew!

Parenting a newborn involves overcoming some initial potholes (like colic and lack of sleep). But after a few months, life proceeds in a sunny way as your baby grows ever cuter and more fun. Then with her first lurching steps toddlerhood is off and running (and so are you)! Within months or even days, your waddling wonder will start developing a new sense of power and defiance. And suddenly you may feel the need to learn how to discipline your little one without squashing her spirit-or losing your mind.

Toddlers make the job of parenting a notch more complicated. During your baby's first year you happily gave her whatever she wanted (milk, a pacifier, a fresh diaper, a change of scenery). Now, however, you can only give her 90 to 95 percent of what she wants. The rest of the time you'll have to say no to her desire because

it is dangerous, or aggressive, or not what you want to do at that

moment.

And guess what? She's not going to like that!

So what do you do?

You try to lovingly "acknowledge her feelings." ("I see you're mad about leaving, but we really have to go. Okay?") You get a fit.

You try to reason. You get a fit.

You distract. You get a fit.

You give a warning. You get a fit.

You do a time-out. You get a fit.

Pretty soon you're having a fit too!

What happened?

Too often we make the mistake of speaking to toddlers as though they're small adults. They understand so much of what we say, it's sometimes hard to remember their limits. Psychologist Thomas Phelan calls this "the little adult assumption." He's right. Toddlers aren't small adults. Toddlers are unique-no longer babies, but not quite "kids." That's why hand-me-down discipline ideas designed for older kids don't work for them. They require a special approach all their own.

People will tell you you need to be more strict or more lenient. But what you really need are skills designed specifically for impulsive, distractible, inarticulate, self-absorbed, primitive toddlers.

First Let's Back Up-Way Back

"The child is nearer to the savage than to the angel."

-C. Gasquoine Hartley, "Mother and Son," 1923

Usually when people say, "It's ancient history," they mean, "Forget about it. It's not worth thinking about." But with toddlers, knowing a little ancient history is exactly what will help you be a terrific parent.

The starting place is your child's level of evolution. If that word makes you think about dinosaurs and fossils, you're on the right track! In dozens of key measures of brain maturity, toddlers are really pint-size Stone Agers! I know that sounds odd. But the language and problem-solving skills of a 12-month-old have more in common with a chimpanzee than a Girl Scout. Two-year-olds use mental processes very similar to those of cavemen. And three-year-olds think more like the first villagers, thousands of years before biblical times, than like your neighborhood Little Leaguers.

At birth your child begins a dramatic journey to adulthood. Starting from total helplessness, she will end up with the ability to recite Shakespeare, create paintings, and offer compassion and care to those in need-things no other animal has ever achieved. And the turning point for this major transition from brutes to humanity

occurs during the toddler years.

In fact, all five of the major feats that make human beings so

extraordinary blossom during the three incredible toddler years:

Walking on two legs

Manipulating things with our hands

Expressing words with our mouths

Combining ideas with our minds

Forming complicated social relationships

You knew your toddler was a busy bug, but that's really accomplishing things!

Mastering all those milestones requires a rapidly evolving brain-which is just what your toddler is blessed with. As the human race evolved, from knuckle-walking to using tools and words, brains got bigger and bigger. Up to a point.

Eventually the heads encasing our fetuses' big brains started becoming too large to slip through the birth canal. In order to get out our newborns had to develop smaller "no frills" brains equipped only to manage the bare necessities such as sucking, peeing, and keeping the heart beating. To make up for this "no frills" nervous system, Nature designed our children's brains to grow dramatically over the first year. By the time your baby's chubby legs take their first steps into toddlerhood, her big brain is off and running too!

A great way to understand this explosion of ability is to understand the biology behind it.

From Monkey Business to . . . Monkey Business?

Introducing "ORP": Sounds like something a baby would do, and it is!

"Our soul is full in all its parts of faint hints . . . flitting for an instant . . . and then gone forever, dim and scarcely audible murmurs of a great and prolonged life . . . of many generations."

-G. Stanley Hall, 1904

What comes out of a frog egg when it hatches? A little froggie? No! Out pops a little tadpole, more fish than amphibian, a small echo of the frog's evolutionary ancestry.

It's the same with humans. The entire history of humanity is encapsulated inside each developing fetus. How is that possible? Back in 1971, when I was a college student in Buffalo, New York, my embryology professor, Gordon Swartz, exposed me to a fascinating law of biology that has since become central to my understanding of toddlers.

This law states: Ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny. (Or ORP!)

Wait, don't run! I know this law sounds weird, but it's actually simple and very fun!

Let me translate ORP into plain English:

Ontogeny? That's your child's development. In short, her steady path of learning and growing, starting from the instant of her conception.

Recapitulates? That means "mirrors" or "repeats."

Phylogeny? That's the step-by-step process of our evolution beginning 1.5 billion years ago.

In short, as your child develops, from conception to adulthood, she will mirror many of the characteristics of our ancient ancestors as they slowly evolved into modern humans.

Here's a fun way to picture this in your mind: Imagine you could watch the growth of your baby like a time-lapse movie from the instant your sperm and egg met, all the way to her high school graduation. In a way, you'd also be watching how life on earth unfolded, a whirlwind tour of evolution, from worms to fish to rabbits to tiny monkeys.

Your fertilized egg, looking a bit like the first single-celled creature to appear on Earth (1.5 billion years ago), rapidly multiplies, morphing from a blackberry-shaped clump of cells to a tubular, wormlike embryo. At about five weeks your tiny fetus begins to rocket through a "fish" stage with flipper-like limbs and little gill-like slits on her neck (400 million years ago); then undergoes an "early mammal" stage with two lines of nipples on her chest and a tiny tail (180 million years ago); then several months before birth these disappear (leaving just the two nipples we're all born with and a few small tailbones at the bottom of the spine). As a beautiful newborn, your baby has tightly grasping fingers and toes, the ability to breathe and swallow at the same time, and maybe even some extra hair on her back, ears, and forehead-all characteristics of newborn monkeys (30 million years ago).

After birth this process continues to speed along. Once your child is able to pull herself onto two wobbly legs, she will have reached the evolutionary stage of the first teetering chimp-like steps (5 million years ago)! That's the starting bell that announces the arrival of toddlerhood, when even more tremendous advancements take place. Around her first birthday, she will be unsteady on her feet and her speech will be a jumble of grunts and gestures. Yet by her fourth birthday, her abilities will match what took the human race five million years to attain. She'll be able to run, speak, sing, and handily wield a fork or a toy hammer. She'll have a developed sense of humor and definite ideas about fairness, and her scribbled pictures will even become recognizable! In fact, by the end of toddlerhood, your child will have grown from just an adorable muffin to a smart little citizen able to start tackling reading and writing-tasks not achieved by even the brainiest adults until about eight thousand years ago.

Your toddler's development is not a perfect reflection of ancient evolution. She looks no more like a caveman or a chimp than a real Neanderthal looked like your 18-month-old tot. But her development does tend to echo the stages our ancestors passed through. That's why ORP is a fun way for you to picture your toddler's march to maturity, and a helpful guide for your communications with her.

Note: Those familiar with anthropology may be troubled by the license I take with nomenclature. Instead of Neanderthal I should have used the name Homo habilis and in place of caveman it would have been more accurate to say archaic Homo sapiens. Alas, those terms are a bit of a mouthful, so for the sake of simplicity, I chose names that were more familiar, albeit less precise.

Why It Helps to Think of Your Toddler

as a Living . . . Fossil

"What's past is prologue."

-William Shakespeare, The Tempest

Over the past fifty years, research in anthropology and on children's brain function has been building a steady foundation of facts to explain the uniqueness of toddlers.

Fossil hunters, using the bones of prehistoric animals, give us an increasingly clear picture of what the life and culture of the earliest humans were like. Huge advances in studying children's brain development have taught us what brain centers turn on at what ages, and what parts of movement, language, and thought they control.

Amazingly, the more we learn about how early man evolved and how young brains develop, the more we discover that there are many close parallels between them. In other words, your child is a kind of living fossil!

Again, no toddler is a carbon copy of a chimpanzee or Stone Ager. (Not even when life with one seems at its rockiest!) But as I will soon detail, communicating with your child will be a lot more successful when you understand how her development echoes prehistoric evolution.

Meet the Flintstones:

The Four Evolutionary Stages of Toddlerhood

Toddlerhood covers three years of exciting change that parallel five million years of human evolution. With so much happening, it's useful to see toddlers as falling into four distinct (but overlapping) phases:

The Charming Chimp-Child (12 to 18 months)

Some parents compare their wrinkled newborns to cute little monkeys, but toddlers? Developmentally, yes! To be more precise, by her first birthday your toddler has climbed the evolutionary ladder all the way up to the stage of the so-called Missing Link, between ape and man, who roamed the earth five million years ago.

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2008

    Happy Mommy

    Got this book a few weeks ago and have already diminished some of the everyday tantrums and battles my 15 month old was having! It seems as if he feels understood and he is a lot more easily redirected now that I have incorporated some 'toddler-ese' when we start having a meltdown.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2005

    Disappointing

    I thought that this book was very disappointing. I heard and read such good reviews on it, but when I got it I was so disappointed! First, his references to monkeys/apes and the human race is not for this Christian family. If he did it once in awhile I would have been ok with it and probably just ignore it, but when literally 1/2 of the book references us as primates is just not for us. Second, he wants me to speak to my child like a dog -- literally! I feel like I am demeaning my child. I know children understand more than we think. Thirdly, I could have skipped the first couple of chapters since the 'meat' of the book isn't until a little bit before the middle. If you're ok with all I wrote, then get the book. I'll give you mine!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2004

    reads like long textbook

    I returned it. It's rather long winded and heavy. If there is good advice in it, it's buried and hard to find.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2004

    Dr. Karp Does It Again!!

    I couldn¿t have lived without The Happiest Baby on the Block and think Dr. Karp¿s new Toddler book is just as wonderful. He really presents an interesting theory. If we stop and think about it, all parents know that their toddler acts like a caveman at times. (It's no accident they named one of the toddlers on the Flintstones 'BamBam!') I know a few parents don't believe in evolution, but we all want ways to teach our young children to be happy, respectful and well behaved...and Dr. Karp really delivers on his promise. His approach is fun, easy and EFFECTIVE. It dramatically helped my uncivilized little toddler in just a few days! For those who don¿t have the time to delve into ¿another parenting book,¿ Dr. Karp has thoughtfully created a DVD. This is a great way for busy moms and dads to get all of the tips, while bypassing the theory. It¿s 30 minutes of solid advice. This is the only way I finally got my husband to sit down and learn the techniques¿and he really loved it. It has truly transformed the way he communicates with our two year old...and made their relationship 100 times better!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2004

    Battle of the Wills No More

    Battle of the Wills soon faded in our home. Needless to say, we did what Dr. Karp said to do over and over and finally, our twin girls got it. It seems odd in the beginning but then, bam, it all works. We love his knowledge about toddlers and now know that his words of wisdom really work. We also love Pocket Parent and Mommy-CEO. Both books cover many topics surrounding toddlers and are a must have with Dr. Karp's book. The three of them saved our sanity!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2004

    Many Techniques Really Work...although a bit awkward at first

    Although the analogy to prehistoric man is overdone a bit, there are so many sensible, clear strategies to try with 1-4 year olds that really are working for us. Talking toddler-ese has really made a difference in the cooperation we are now getting from our 2 and 3 year olds. Mirroring their feelings and 'wants' with short, repeated phrases that reflect the child's words, tone and body lauguage has quickly and almost magically stopped much of my toddlers' defiant, annoying behaviors. Karp emphasizes that what you say to someone who is really upset is less important than HOW YOU SAY IT. And his theory has proven itself to be correct in our home. The only suggestion in the book that I have a problem with is using a hook and eye latch to lock a child in his room even for a very short time-out. I feel this can be scary for the child and although it may get the child to know that you do mean business, I prefer not to get compliance from my children with fear, guilt or humiliation. Karp does suggest that you explain to the child in 'toddler-ese' how the locking mechanism works (before you use it) so that the toddler will know the door will not open when mom does use it. I also recommend another one of my favorite parenting reference books as a compliment to Karp's hardcover book called 'The Pocket Parent'. This is a very practical, quick read, little paperback book loaded with many positive discipline and communications tips written exclusively for parents of 2-5 year olds. Peppered with humor and organized alphabetically by behaviors such as: Anger, Bad Words, Biting, Bedtime and Mealtime Refusals, the 'Gimmees', Interrrupting, Morning 'Crazies', and Whining...Pocket Parent is a real sanity saver. Both books will lift your spirits with specific ideas to try as well as loads of compassionte support from authors that have been there, too... especially when you feel you are just about at your wits' end with the little ones.

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