The Child's Child: A Novel

( 8 )

Overview

When their grandmother dies, adult siblings Grace and Andrew Easton inherit her sprawling London home. Rather than sell it, they move in together, splitting the numerous bedrooms and studies. The arrangement is unusual, but ideal for the affectionate pair—until the day Andrew brings home a new boyfriend, a devilishly handsome novelist named James. When he and Andrew witness their friend’s murder outside a London nightclub, James begins to unravel, and what happens next changes ...

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The Child's Child

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Overview

When their grandmother dies, adult siblings Grace and Andrew Easton inherit her sprawling London home. Rather than sell it, they move in together, splitting the numerous bedrooms and studies. The arrangement is unusual, but ideal for the affectionate pair—until the day Andrew brings home a new boyfriend, a devilishly handsome novelist named James. When he and Andrew witness their friend’s murder outside a London nightclub, James begins to unravel, and what happens next changes the lives of everyone in the house.

As turmoil sets in, Grace escapes into reading a manuscript—a long-lost novel from 1951 called The Child’s Child—never published because of its taboo subject matter. The book is the story of two siblings born a few years after World War One. This brother and sister, John and Maud, mirror the present-day Andrew and Grace: a homosexual brother and a sister carrying an illegitimate child.

The Child’s Child is a brilliantly constructed novel-within-a-novel about family, betrayal, and disgrace.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

When mystery author Ruth Rendell writes as Barbara Vine, you might say that she is a novelist-within-a-novelist, just as you might describe The Child's Child as a novel-within-a-novel. This captivating story focuses on Grace and Andrew Easton, a brother-and-sister ensconced in an old family house. The arrival of the brother's new boyfriend James disrupts the peace of the household, but that stressor intensifies after Andrew and James witness a friend's murder outside a London nightclub. As the pair struggle to cope with the trauma of the event, Grace escapes into the manuscript of a never-published novel, entitled (you guessed it) "The Child's Child." Only an author with Rendell/Vine's mastery could create a work as adroitly resonant as this.

From the Publisher
“The Rendell/Vine partnership has for years been producing consistently better work than most Booker winners put together.”

“Barbara Vine is Ruth Rendell letting rip.”

"A novel by Ruth Rendell (or her literary alter ego, Barbara Vine) is like none other..... The results are seldom what we expect them to be, and that is part of this author's special genius."

"Vine vividly conjures the high price paid by social outcasts, even in our own supposedly enlightened age."

"Just a cracking good read."

"Ruth Rendell, whether writing her mystery novels or molting into Barbara Vine and burrowing deep into réalité intérieure, has always written thoughtful novels on the consequences of our choice."

"In the hands of Vine, otherwise known as Ruth Rendell, the book-within-a-book strategy evolves into something infinitely more intricate — a sinister, constantly shifting Rubik's Cube of motives, betrayals, and violence. Grade A"

"A study of taboos of the past and the growing tolerance of the present — except when open-mindedness is absent — The Child's Child encompasses darkness and light — and simultaneously offers diverting fiction with thought-provoking but never preachy purpose."

''Subtle'' is an inadequate word for Ruth Rendell. So are 'crafty,' 'cunning,' 'clever' and 'sly.' Although these are accurate descriptions of her confounding technique, a better word would be 'surprising.' Whatever it is you might think Rendell is up to, especially when she's writing as Barbara Vine — that's not it."

"Not even fans who expect more felonies will be able to put this one down."

Ian Rankin
“The Rendell/Vine partnership has for years been producing consistently better work than most Booker winners put together.”
The Daily Telegraph (UK)
“Barbara Vine is Ruth Rendell letting rip.”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Robert Croan
"A novel by Ruth Rendell (or her literary alter ego, Barbara Vine) is like none other..... The results are seldom what we expect them to be, and that is part of this author's special genius."
Charlotte Observer
"Just a cracking good read."
The Daily Beast
"Ruth Rendell, whether writing her mystery novels or molting into Barbara Vine and burrowing deep into réalité intérieure, has always written thoughtful novels on the consequences of our choice."
Entertainment Weekly - Tina Jordan
"In the hands of Vine, otherwise known as Ruth Rendell, the book-within-a-book strategy evolves into something infinitely more intricate — a sinister, constantly shifting Rubik's Cube of motives, betrayals, and violence. Grade A"
Richmond Times Dispatch
"A study of taboos of the past and the growing tolerance of the present — except when open-mindedness is absent — The Child's Child encompasses darkness and light — and simultaneously offers diverting fiction with thought-provoking but never preachy purpose."
New York Times Book Review - Marilyn Stasio
''Subtle'' is an inadequate word for Ruth Rendell. So are 'crafty,' 'cunning,' 'clever' and 'sly.' Although these are accurate descriptions of her confounding technique, a better word would be 'surprising.' Whatever it is you might think Rendell is up to, especially when she's writing as Barbara Vine — that's not it."
People magazine (3 1/2 stars)
"Vine vividly conjures the high price paid by social outcasts, even in our own supposedly enlightened age."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781476704272
  • Publisher: Scribner
  • Publication date: 10/8/2013
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 580,520
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Barbara Vine is a pseudonym for Ruth Rendell, who has won numerous awards, including three Edgars, the highest accolade from Mystery Writers of America, as well as three Gold Daggers, a Silver Dagger, and a Diamond Dagger for outstanding contribution to the genre from England’s prestigious Crime Writer’s Association. A member of the House of Lords, she lives in London. Ruth Rendell's newest novel is No Man's Nightingale.

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Read an Excerpt

2

WHILE TEACHING at a university in West London, I had been working for a PhD on a subject with which no one among my family and friends seemed to have any connection: single parents or, in the phrase Toby Greenwell had used, unmarried mothers. As my supervisor remarked after I chose the subject (and she reluctantly approved), it would be a bit absurd in a climate where nearly half of women remain unwed. So “Single Parents.” Such women in English literature was the idea, but I was still asking myself—and Carla, my supervisor—if this should be extended into life. Into reality. Would this make it too much like a social science tract?

When my grandmother died, I had already begun reading every English novel I could find that dealt with illegitimacy or with the mothers of illegitimate children. I was living in a flat in West London that I shared with two other women and a man, a not unusual configuration in overcrowded oughties London. The day before her death I had visited her in hospital, where she had been for just a week. A stroke had incapacitated her without disfiguring her, but she could no longer speak. I held her hand and talked to her. She had been a great reader and knew all those works of Hardy and Elizabeth Gaskell and a host of others that I was reading for my thesis. But when I named them, she gave no sign of having heard, though just before I left I felt a light pressure on her hand from mine. The phone call from my mother came next morning. My grandmother, her mother, had died that night.

She was eighty-five. A good age, as they say. No one ever says “a bad age,” but I suppose that would be mine, twenty-eight, or my brother’s, thirty. We were just the age when people tire of sharing flats with two or three others or crippling themselves with a huge mortgage for two or three rooms, but at the time of our grandmother’s death we could see no end to it. We mourned her. We went to the funeral, both of us in black, I because it is chic, Andrew because as a fashion-conscious gay man, he possessed a slender black suit. My mother wore a grey dress and cried all the time, unusual for her in any circumstances. Next day we heard from her solicitors that my grandmother had left her house in Hampstead jointly to my brother and me.

I have been honest about why we wore black, so I may as well keep up the honesty and say we expected something. Verity Stewart—we had always called her Verity—had a son and a daughter to leave her considerable fortune to (and she did leave it to them), but as we were the only grandchildren, I thought we might get a bit each, enough, say, to help with getting on what’s called the property ladder. Instead we got the property itself, a fine big house near the Heath.

Fay, my mother, and her partner, Malcolm, expected us to do the sensible thing, the practical thing: sell it and divide the proceeds. Instead, we did the unwise thing and kept it. Surely a house with four living-rooms, six bedrooms, and three bathrooms (and about three thousand books) was big enough for a man and a woman who had always got on with each other. We failed to take into account that there was only one kitchen, one staircase, and one front door, congratulating each other that neither of us played loud music or was likely to have a party to which the other was not invited. There was one thing we never thought about, though why not I don’t know. We were both young, and if we had none now, each had had several partners, and one of us, perhaps both, was likely to have a lover living in.

In Andrew’s case that happened quite soon after we moved in.

James Derain is a novelist, his books published by Andrew’s firm, as were Martin Greenwell’s, which is how Andrew knew about Martin’s literary output. They met at a publisher’s party. The occasion can’t have been the anniversary of Oscar Wilde’s birth or, come to that, his death, it was too late for that, but it was something to do with Wilde, a hero of James Derain’s. At that party James told Andrew about Martin Greenwell and a book he’d written but never published that was based on the life of James’s uncle or great-uncle. That party was the start of their friendship. It led to a relationship—and soon, a falling in love, which they celebrated with a trip to Paris for the weekend. They went to look at Wilde’s newly refurbished tomb. It had been restored to Epstein’s original pristine whiteness before its surface was damaged by the lipstick of all the women who came to kiss it over the years. Who would have supposed lipstick could scar marble? Andrew was happy about the lip imprints, saying it almost made up for all the women who spat at Wilde in the street after his downfall.

Andrew and I had made a rough division of the house, the rooms on the left-hand side, upstairs and down, mine, and those on the right, his. That was all very well, I got one bathroom, he got two; I got three bedrooms and Verity’s study, he got my grandfather Christopher’s study and three bedrooms. But we had to share the kitchen, which was enormous, and on my side of the house.

“How many places have you lived in,” Andrew asked, “where you’ve had to share the kitchen with two or three other people?”

I thought about it, tried counting. “Four. It seems different in a place this size.”

“Let’s give it a go. If we can’t stand it, we’ll have another kitchen put in.”

It didn’t much concern me. The house was marvellous to live in—in those first weeks—and like my grandmother I spent most of my time blissfully reading. It was spring and warm and I sat reading out in the garden, comfortable in a cane chair with a stack of books on the table in front of me, all of them fictional accounts of unwanted pregnancies and illegitimate births. Sometimes I raised my eyes to “look upon verdure,” as Jane Austen has it. Only one such birth in her works, only one “natural child,” and that one Harriet Smith, for whom Emma attempts the hopeless task of encouraging a clergyman, and therefore a gentleman, to marry her. Harriet may be the daughter of a gentleman, but somehow her illegitimacy negates that and makes her fit to marry a farmer but no one higher up the social scale.

One book I didn’t look at was The Child’s Child, and I wasn’t conscience-stricken, not then, though I did mention it to Andrew, who came out into the garden before going to work. He hadn’t exactly forgotten about the book but seemed to drag it up out of the depths of memory before light dawned.

“It’s been lying in a cupboard for half a century,” he said. “No harm done if it hangs about for a bit longer.”

Something happened that afternoon which was to have great importance in my life, as much as it has had in Andrew’s. I met James Derain.

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Customer Reviews

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( 8 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2012

    Ruth Rendell is one of the finest writers alive

    And the previous reviewer is an idiot. Why review a book by a writer you supposedly stopped reading long ago? And if you are put off by subtle psychological portraiture, then Rendell (who sometimes writes as Barbara Vine) certainly isn't for you. You'd be better served by James Patterson or whatever other junk franchise is sitting on the grocery store shelves this week. In fact, you might be better served by putting down books entirely and watching hours-long marathons of Law and Order or Two and a Half Men, since that seems more your speed.

    6 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 30, 2012

    I have got to stop paying attention to "Entertainment Wee

    I have got to stop paying attention to "Entertainment Weekly" book reviews.

    "The Child's Child" was well-written but horrible. Not a single likable character resides within its pages. Half the book is devoted to the story of Grace, an academic who lives in her grandmother's mansion with her gay brother, Andrew. Andrew has a new lover, James, who's a bipolar nut bag. Grace doesn't like James yet sleeps with him to make him feel better when he's depressed over a friend's murder. Neither of these people is mature enough to think about protection and Grace winds up pregnant. Andrew and James move out, leaving Grace on her own.

    To distract herself, Grace works on her thesis which includes an unpublished book called "The Child's Child" about a 15 year old girl, Maud, who gets knocked up. Her gay brother, John, takes her to a new town where they pose as man and wife. John is in love with Bertie, a skanky sociopath who later kills John. Maud then suffers a nervous breakdown, inherits a bunch of money and treats everyone around her horribly. Every character in this book shows a stubborn obliviousness when it comes to saying and doing terrible things to each other.

    There wasn't a single joke or moment of happiness in this book. I'm sorry I wasted my time on this

    2 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 17, 2013

    I love Barbara Vine/Ruth Rendall, but this book went nowhere. I

    I love Barbara Vine/Ruth Rendall, but this book went nowhere. I kept expecting the two stories to be connected in some interesting way at the end but it did not happen. They were simply two stories of a brother and sister, and the brothers' gay lovers. None of the characters had any dedeeming qualities except perhaps Andrew but we never heard his point of view. I expected much more from Barbara Vine.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 14, 2013

    I gave up on page 60. I was so bored reading endless pages of G

    I gave up on page 60. I was so bored reading endless pages of Grace talking about her thesis. I get that her life started to mirror her topic but by that point I just didn't care.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Hate you

    Love this author hate this book its awesome

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 1, 2012

    I stopped reading this author years ago when I ran out of patien

    I stopped reading this author years ago when I ran out of patience and interest in the psychological meanderings of various perverted individuals.I simply don't find them interesting and I'm always amazed at how long the other characters put up with them before they work out how depraved they are.

    0 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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