The Cinema of Satyajit Ray: Between Tradition and Modernity

The Cinema of Satyajit Ray: Between Tradition and Modernity

by Darius Cooper
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521620260

ISBN-13: 9780521620260

Pub. Date: 01/28/2000

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

The most comprehensive treatment of Satyajit Ray's work, The Cinema of Satyajit Ray makes accessible the oeuvre of one of the most prolific and creative filmmakers of the twentieth century. Providing analyses of selected films, including those that comprise The Apu Trilogy, Chess Players, and Jalsaghar, among others, Darius Cooper outlines Western influences on Ray's…  See more details below

Overview

The most comprehensive treatment of Satyajit Ray's work, The Cinema of Satyajit Ray makes accessible the oeuvre of one of the most prolific and creative filmmakers of the twentieth century. Providing analyses of selected films, including those that comprise The Apu Trilogy, Chess Players, and Jalsaghar, among others, Darius Cooper outlines Western influences on Ray's work, such as the plight of women functioning within a patriarchal society, Ray's political vision of the "doubly colonized," and his attack and critique of the Bengali/Indian middle class of today.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521620260
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
01/28/2000
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Film Series
Pages:
274
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.75(d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction1
1Between Wonder, Intuition, and Suggestion: Rasa in Satyajit Ray's The Apu Triology and Jalsaghar15
Rasa Theory: An Overview15
The Excellence Implicit in the Classical Aesthetic form of Rasa: Three Principles24
Rasa in Pather Panchali (1955)26
Rasa in Aparajito (1956)40
Rasa in Apur Sansar (1959)50
Jalsaghar (1958): A Critical Evaluation Rendered through Rasa64
2From Gazes to Threat: the Odyssean Yatra (Journey) of the Ray Woman75
The "Roles" of the Indian Woman as Determined by Hindu Society: A Historical Background75
Woman Redefined in the Tagore Triad: "The Postmaster," Charulata, and Ghare-Baire79
The Ray Woman - Under the Male Hindu Gaze96
Women as Possessors of the Gaze102
Two Ray Women - in Masquerade106
The Victimized Woman Who Dares to Humble the Father108
The Articulation of the Ray Woman - From a Space She Can Call Her Own118
The Ray Woman's Politics of Silence122
The Ray Woman as Hedonist127
Concluding Remarks: In Praise of Satyajit Ray's Feminist Stance132
3The Responses, Trauma, and Subjectivity of the Ray Purush (Man)134
The Philosophical Determinant of Suffering and the Responses of the Ray Purush: Siddhartha's Response in Pratidwandi (1970)134
Somnath's Response in Jana Aranya (1975)143
Gangacharan's Response in Ashani Sanket (1973)147
Shyamalendu's Response in Seemabaddba (1971)152
The Responses of the Forest-Bound Male Quartet of Aranyer Din Ratri (1970)157
Fearsome Fathers and Traumatized Sons161
4Satyajit Ray's Political Vision of the Doubly Colonized177
The Tradition of the Doubly Colonized in India: A Critical Introduction to the Hegemonic Structures of Hinduism and Colonialism177
The Hindu Hegemony178
The British Hegemony184
The Colonized Artist's Response: Ray's Sadgati (1981) and Shatranj-ke-Khilari (1977)189
5From Newly Discovered Margins: Ray's Responses to the Center213
From "Zero" to "Captain Nemo": Ray's Problematic Alphabet of 1990s Indians215
The (T)issues of Language: Ray's Principal Instrument of Bhadralok Censure219
The Burden(s) of Mise-en-Scene: Ray's 1990s Filmic Style225
Unsatisfactory and Satisfactory Endings231
On Ray - The Final Epitaph234
Notes235
Selected Bibliography245
Filmography249
Index255

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