The City of Man:

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Overview

"More than simply an intellectual history of liberalism. . .[this is also] a powerful and impassioned analysis of modernity. . . . [Manent] writes with a gallic charm or with an esprit de finesse that is able to convey philosophical richness as well as be a good read."--Steven B. Smith, Yale University

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Editorial Reviews

The Wall Street Journal - Peter Berger
[Manent's] book is probably the most relentless assault on modernity to appear in many years. It is in many ways a brilliant book.
The Washington Times - Dianna Schaub
Certainly a word of thanks is due to the editors of the New French Thought series, and to Marc A. LePain, the translator of this volume, for making available to an American audience a work of such challenging clarity and depth.
First Things - Russell Hittinger
Manent is perhaps the brightest light in a new generation of French intellectuals.
From the Publisher

"[Manent's] book is probably the most relentless assault on modernity to appear in many years. It is in many ways a brilliant book."--Peter Berger, The Wall Street Journal

"Working within a framework that sees the modern project as a sustained attempt to abolish the question of 'man' and replace it with 'history,' Manent breathes new life into the debate between ancients and moderns."--The Review of Politics

"Certainly a word of thanks is due to the editors of the New French Thought series, and to Marc A. LePain, the translator of this volume, for making available to an American audience a work of such challenging clarity and depth."--Dianna Schaub, The Washington Times

"Manent is perhaps the brightest light in a new generation of French intellectuals."--Russell Hittinger, First Things

First Things
Manent is perhaps the brightest light in a new generation of French intellectuals.
— Russell Hittinger
The Wall Street Journal
[Manent's] book is probably the most relentless assault on modernity to appear in many years. It is in many ways a brilliant book.
— Peter Berger
The Review of Politics
Working within a framework that sees the modern project as a sustained attempt to abolish the question of 'man' and replace it with 'history,' Manent breathes new life into the debate between ancients and moderns.
The Washington Times
Certainly a word of thanks is due to the editors of the New French Thought series, and to Marc A. LePain, the translator of this volume, for making available to an American audience a work of such challenging clarity and depth.
— Dianna Schaub
John Gray
Pierre Manent's City of Man is nothing less than a diagnosis of the modern condition. Subtly written and containing passages of deep learning, it presents a powerful challenge to the modern world's image of itself. -- National Review
Library Journal
As we approach the end of the century, which has seen perhaps the most rapid and pervasive changes in society and culture ever, many Western writers are reexamining the consequences of these changes and are discovering that they have not necessarily all been for the good. In this book, first published in France in 1994 and now translated into English for the first time, Manent (philosophy, cole des Hautes tudes Sociales, Paris) examines what he takes to be the fundamental rootlessness of Western civilization. He argues that in freeing ourselves from the intellectual orientation of the ancient world, which studied man "as man," we have become excessively self-conscious, fixing upon the study rather of "modern man." The result of this refocusing, Manent argues, is that we have lost man "as man" as a focus of study and come to see our culture as influenced by various waves of historical, social, and political necessity. In essence, we have become divorced from the traditions that formerly helped us to anchor and sustain ourselves, and we are now drifting confused, the victims of forces that we do not control and quite probably do not understand. Manent's thesis is not new, but his contribution to the debate is the presentation of the problem in a clear and cogent fashion, and for this reason, his work is valuable. Recommended for all libraries.Terry C. Skeats, Bishop's Univ. Lib., Lennoxville, Quebec
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691050256
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 4/17/2000
  • Series: New French Thought Series
  • Pages: 248
  • Product dimensions: 6.16 (w) x 9.26 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Table of Contents


Foreword Jean Bethke Elshtain
Introduction
Part One: THE SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS OF MODERN MAN
CHAPTER I The Authority of History
CHAPTER II The Sociological Viewpoint
CHAPTER III The Economic System
Part Two: THE SELF-AFFIRMATION OF MODERN MAN
CHAPTER IV The Hidden Man
CHAPTER V The Triumph of the Will
CHAPTER VI The End of Nature
Notes
Index
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