The City of Mirrors (Passage Trilogy Series #3)

The City of Mirrors (Passage Trilogy Series #3)

4.2 42
by Justin Cronin
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “A thrilling finale to a trilogy that will stand as one of the great achievements in American fantasy fiction.”—Stephen King

You followed The Passage. You faced The Twelve. Now enter The City of Mirrors for the final reckoning. As the bestselling epic races to its

Overview

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “A thrilling finale to a trilogy that will stand as one of the great achievements in American fantasy fiction.”—Stephen King

You followed The Passage. You faced The Twelve. Now enter The City of Mirrors for the final reckoning. As the bestselling epic races to its breathtaking finale, Justin Cronin’s band of hardened survivors await the second coming of unspeakable darkness.

The world we knew is gone. What world will rise in its place?

The Twelve have been destroyed and the terrifying hundred-year reign of darkness that descended upon the world has ended. The survivors are stepping outside their walls, determined to build society anew—and daring to dream of a hopeful future.

But far from them, in a dead metropolis, he waits: Zero. The First. Father of the Twelve. The anguish that shattered his human life haunts him, and the hatred spawned by his transformation burns bright. His fury will be quenched only when he destroys Amy—humanity’s only hope, the Girl from Nowhere who grew up to rise against him.

One last time light and dark will clash, and at last Amy and her friends will know their fate.

Praise for The City of Mirrors

“Compulsively readable.”—The New York Times Book Review

“The City of Mirrors is poetry. Thrilling in every way it has to be, but poetry just the same . . . The writing is sumptuous, the language lovely, even when the action itself is dark and violent.”—The Huffington Post

“This really is the big event you’ve been waiting for . . .  A true last stand that builds and comes with a bloody, roaring payoff you won’t see coming, then builds again to the big face off you’ve been waiting for.”—NPR

“A masterpiece . . .  with The City of Mirrors, the third volume in The Passage trilogy, Justin Cronin puts paid to what may well be the finest post-apocalyptic epic in our dystopian-glutted times. A stunning achievement by virtually every measure.”—The National Post

“Justin Cronin’s Passage trilogy is remarkable for the unremitting drive of its narrative, for the breathtaking sweep of its imagined future, and for the clear lucidity of its language.”—Stephen King

“Superb . . . This conclusion to bestseller Cronin’s apocalyptic thriller trilogy ends with all of the heartbreak, joy, and unexpected twists of fate that events in The Passage and The Twelve foreordained.”Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Readers who have been patiently awaiting the conclusion to Cronin’s sweeping postapocalyptic trilogy are richly rewarded with this epic, heart-wrenching novel. . . . Not only does this title bring the series to a thrilling and satisfying conclusion, but it also exhibits Cronin’s moving exploration of love as both a destructive force and an elemental need, elevating this work among its dystopian peers.”Library Journal (starred review)

Praise for Justin Cronin

“One of those rare authors who work on two different levels, blending elegantly crafted literary fiction with cliff-hanging thrills.”—Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Editorial Reviews

B&N Reads
4/29/2016
Cronin delivers a near-perfect finale for his award-winning, best-selling series. With eleven of the twelve Virals destroyed, it seems like humanity can finally breathe a sigh of relief and begin reclaiming the world—but Zero, the last Viral, remains in New York and has other plans. Cronin explores the world before the virus and the people directly responsible for the apocalypse, while also bringing together the characters we've come to love and pitting them into a satisfying, heartbreaking climax that will have readers white-knuckled as they read and completely satisfied when they're done. Read More
The New York Times Book Review - Vanessa Friedman
Lengthy as the book is, it is also compulsively readable.
Publishers Weekly
★ 03/28/2016
This conclusion to bestseller Cronin’s apocalyptic thriller trilogy ends with all of the heartbreak, joy, and unexpected twists of fate that events in The Passage and The Twelve foreordained. It’s nearly a century after the release of the Easter Virus that decimated humanity and several years since the last of the infected people known as virals were seen. The citizens of Kerrville, Tex., one of the last human enclaves, are just beginning to feel confident enough to settle outside the borders of their protected community. But when pets, and then people, begin disappearing mysteriously, it becomes horrifyingly evident that virals are on the rampage again—and that this time there may be no stopping them. As in the two previous novels, Cronin skillfully manages a large cast of characters, all of whom he has endowed with fully developed personalities that engage the reader emotionally. Although its plot is understandably heavily dependent on events in the first two books, this novel is a superb capstone to a modern horror thriller epic. 15-city author tour. Agent: Ellen Levine, Trident Media Group. (May)
Library Journal
★ 03/01/2016
Readers who have been patiently awaiting the conclusion to Cronin's sweeping postapocalyptic trilogy (The Passage; The Twelve) are richly rewarded with this epic, heart-wrenching novel. The story picks up several years after the destruction of the Homeland and the evacuation of many of its citizens to Texas. With 11 of the 12 virals destroyed, a period of relative peace has settled on the landscape. Yet the remaining viral, Zero, still haunts the ruins of New York City, preparing for his final standoff with humankind. Of the believable and endearing characters the author created through three books, Amy, the Girl from Nowhere, as well as Peter, Michael, and Alicia, are all back for the finale. The story really shines when Cronin takes readers back to the beginning, before the virus reshaped the world, and explores the bonds among a trio of Harvard University undergrads that would ultimately lead to a global pandemic. VERDICT Not only does this title bring the series to a thrilling and satisfying conclusion, but it also exhibits Cronin's moving exploration of love as both a destructive force and an elemental need, elevating this work among its dystopian peers. Bound to be in heavy demand by trilogy fans as well as those who appreciate Stephen King, Joe Hill, and Dean Koontz. [15-city tour.]—Amy Hoseth, Colorado State Univ. Lib., Fort Collins
Kirkus Reviews
2016-03-17
What are you going to do after vanquishing the virals? Why, properly inoculated, refound civilization, of course. Marilynne Robinson isn't the only writer to situate a woman named Lila in the green groves of Iowa. Nope: Cronin (The Twelve, 2012, etc.) does so too, his Lila a warden to damaged young Kate, whose biblically named mom, Sara, has been shunted off into captivity by the Redeyes, unpleasant people made that way by genetic tinkering via the virals—they being, readers of Cronin's predecessor volumes will recall, supersoldiers gone awry thanks to inevitable screw-ups on the parts of the mad scientists at Monsanto, or wherever mad scientists find work in these fraught times. Leave it to Amy, Alicia of Blades, Peter the martyred rock on which the future is founded ("Blood was dripping from his hair, flowing down the creases of his face"), and all the other good guys to hack and slash their ways across the landscape to the promised land of Ottumwa, or wherever it is that good guys make their ways to in the very bad near future. Cronin writes with intelligence and verve, and he serves up a good imitation of Sergio Leone: "Of Amy, the Girl from Nowhere," he writes in a denouement, "there is no mention. Perhaps we shall never learn who she was, if she existed at all." That there's anyone to worry about literary archaeology 1,000 years after events means that humankind survived, so yea, but only after much gore and heroic talk befitting an apocalyptic yarn. Some of the story seems castoff Walter Miller, whose Canticle for Leibowitz imagines religious belief of the future as a reflection of oddball events in the distant past—our own time, that is. And overall, there's a kind of slow-hissing-of-air-out-of-a-balloon feel to the whole enterprise, as if this trilogy might have better been served up as a twin set. Of interest to fans who have followed the story through the first two books, but a bumpy ride without that background.
From the Publisher
Praise for The City of Mirrors

“Compulsively readable.”—The New York Times Book Review

“The City of Mirrors is poetry. Thrilling in every way it has to be, but poetry just the same . . . The writing is sumptuous, the language lovely, even when the action itself is dark and violent.”—The Huffington Post

“This really is the big event you’ve been waiting for . . .  A true last stand that builds and comes with a bloody, roaring payoff you won’t see coming, then builds again to the big face off you’ve been waiting for.”—NPR

“A masterpiece . . .  with The City of Mirrors, the third volume in The Passage trilogy, Justin Cronin puts paid to what may well be the finest post-apocalyptic epic in our dystopian-glutted times. A stunning achievement by virtually every measure.”—The National Post

“Justin Cronin’s Passage trilogy is remarkable for the unremitting drive of its narrative, for the breathtaking sweep of its imagined future, and for the clear lucidity of its language. The City of Mirrors is a thrilling finale to a trilogy that will stand as one of the great achievements in American fantasy fiction.”—Stephen King

“Superb . . . This conclusion to bestseller Cronin’s apocalyptic thriller trilogy ends with all of the heartbreak, joy, and unexpected twists of fate that events in The Passage and The Twelve foreordained.”Publishers Weekly (starred review)
 
“Readers who have been patiently awaiting the conclusion to Cronin’s sweeping postapocalyptic trilogy are richly rewarded with this epic, heart-wrenching novel. . . . Not only does this title bring the series to a thrilling and satisfying conclusion, but it also exhibits Cronin’s moving exploration of love as both a destructive force and an elemental need, elevating this work among its dystopian peers.”Library Journal (starred review)

Praise for Justin Cronin
 
“One of those rare authors who work on two different levels, blending elegantly crafted literary fiction with cliff-hanging thrills.”—Fort Worth Star-Telegram
 
The Passage
 
“Magnificent . . . Cronin has taken his literary gifts, and he has weaponized them. . . . The Passage can stand proudly next to Stephen King’s apocalyptic masterpiece The Stand, but a closer match would be Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.”Time
 
“Read this book and the ordinary world disappears.”—Stephen King
 
“[A] big, engrossing read that will have you leaving the lights on late into the night.”The Dallas Morning News
 
The Twelve
 
“[A] literary superthriller, driven at once by character and plot.”—The New York Times Book Review
 
“Gripping . . . Cronin [introduces] eerie new elements to his masterful mythology.”—The San Diego Union-Tribune
 
“An undeniable and compelling epic . . . a complex narrative of flight and forgiveness, of great suffering and staggering loss, of terrible betrayals and incredible hope.”—Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780345505002
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/24/2016
Series:
Passage Trilogy Series , #3
Pages:
624
Sales rank:
3,252
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.40(h) x 1.80(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Justin Cronin is the New York Times bestselling author of The Passage, The Twelve, Mary and O’Neil (which won the PEN/Hemingway Award and the Stephen Crane Prize), and The Summer Guest. Other honors for his writing include a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and a Whiting Writers’ Award. A Distinguished Faculty Fellow at Rice University, he divides his time between Houston, Texas, and Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The City of Mirrors (Signed Book) (Passage Trilogy Series #3) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 42 reviews.
Anonymous 10 months ago
This final book in the trilogy was excellent. Well worth the time and money. I look forward to any book by this author in the future. Stop reading this review and start reading his books!
Anonymous 10 months ago
The passage was an amazing book and the second book of this trilogy was uplifting. Needless to say that I awaited the last book eagerly and it sure delivers. Not to mention that the writing is absolutely wonderful, more of a literature book then a SF , but that what great books do, transport us yet at the same time remind us of what it means to be human. Bravo
Anonymous 8 months ago
Loved it just like the first two. I was sad when I finished it.
daveb48 8 months ago
I received this book as an ARC. It is an unedited version, so there are some typos and others things that I understand will be corrected in the final version. That in no way diminished my enjoyment of this book. This one is, in my opinion, the best of the three in the series. I especially enjoyed the sections where the author provided details about the past lives of the main characters. There is a very compelling section that provides an in-depth telling of the life of Tim Fanning (Zero). Parts of the book are sad, as might be expected in a series finale there are deaths and lots of drama, but the ending is worth the wait. I won't spoil it but I will say that it both surprised and didn't surprise me. It left me satisfied that the story was fully told. I don't often rate a book 5 stars and one of the criteria for such a rating is if I stay up late to keep reading and both anticipate and dread the ending. That was certainly the case for "The City of Mirrors." If you have read the first two books in this series, you must read this book because without it, the rest is simply subtext.
Anonymous 9 months ago
Thank you for such a beautiful story. With such complex characters and rich storytelling, its been a wonderful journey. Although I have been in tears since part two of the book, I truly appreciate how gracefully you had us say goodbye to Amy and her twelve.
Anonymous 9 months ago
Years ago, I fell in love with The Passage... I was late to the game and moved right into The Twelve. These are characters that stay with you and you feel witness to a maturing group as they face unreal odds. This began the long wait for the conclusion and The City of Mirrors gave us the ending we needed to bid farewell to a beloved group of characters. It jumped around a fair amount and there were a fair amount. of new characters introduced, enough to add some confusion but at the same time necessary to provide the back story to a villain we didn't want to love but could certainly sympathize with. Justin Cronin's talent in humanizing the inhuman and building characters you KNOW is what makes him stand out amongst his contemporaries.
Anonymous 9 months ago
Justin Cronin brings the Passage trilogy to an end deserving of the characters. From the start I loved each and every one of them. Their flaws and humanity made them relateable and they became like friends. And even though I am sad that their journey has come to an end, I am thankful that Cronin did right by them.
Anonymous 22 days ago
I thought I would miss the characters knowing this is the ending. Not even, very well written for the end of the series. I had a feeling of satisfaction. But if there is more, I will not be disappointed.
MxPxP86 25 days ago
After a bit disjointed (though plenty fulfilling) middle book in The Twelve, this finale wraps it all up like a great close should. A smart, engaging, and active read with worthwhile characters and circumstances, it tells a story and weaves in what I assume is the author's opinions on faith, meaning, family, and how the span of time is an active agent in everyone's own experience. I'm glad I had the chance to read the trilogy through.
Anonymous 28 days ago
It is weird and it is predictable and boring ! Dont read it!!!!"!!!:(
SheilaDeeth 3 months ago
City of Mirrors follows the Passage and the Twelve to complete Justin Cronin’s epic trilogy. Like the other books, it features a huge cast of characters, traveling and staying in a multitude of places, and gradually brought together to a logical unity. But this time the unity has a genuine sense of finality; the story really is complete; and the disparate parts, by turn absorbing, frustrating, confusing, terrifying and enthralling, combine into a significantly greater whole. The ending makes a breathtaking sense of it all, and offers readers a breathtaking insight into the meaning of life—complicated, messy, wonderful, broken, and infinitely healable. The novel starts with an almost Biblical recap—hard to read and all too easy to skip over. But soon the story’s afoot again, with the reader probably wishing it wasn’t so long since they’d read volumes one and two. Luckily the characters are strong enough to entice until memory returns—at which point rereading the introduction might almost bring understanding. There’s a haunting sense of time’s passage in City of Mirrors. People and locations have aged. Mirrors show the gray that we’d rather ignore. Truth has power. And power has consequences. Mystical and strange in parts, then earthy and detailed in others, the story weaves together into a climax of crashing waves and thrashing terrors… and peace once previewed proving impossibly real. Do we build our myths from lies or truth? Do we cling to faith through human determination or observation? Is there, was there, will there be purpose to it all? Deep questions haunt the lives of well-drawn characters. Complex mysteries give just enough clues and no more. And a breathtaking ending makes everything worthwhile. Yes, it confused and annoyed me at times, but this book has to get a five-star rating because it’s the perfect ending to a tale of imperfect lives, it really does bring the series full circle, and its haunting themes will continue to ring in my mind long after the reading’s done. Disclosure: My son loaned it to me.
YoyoMitch 4 months ago
I was concerned when the publishing of the final book in this trilogy was repeatedly delayed (for 3+ years) I feared that it’s hold-up was due to the editors knew it was going to be a letdown, as such has been true before (see Jean Auel’s “Earth’s Children Series”). I do not know the reason for the delay, I do know the wait was well worth the postponement. Mr. Cronin completed this dystopic warning with purpose, appropriate joy & heartache and a fitting conclusion of hope long denied. The story opens eight months before the events at the end of The Twelve but only for the moments needed to give a foundation for the action that will fill the next 600 pages. The heroes of the Homeland Liberation are quickly about rebuilding humanity in the wasteland that was once North America. Alicia finds a place to heal, then proceeds to New York where she hopes to kill Zero, the first of the Virals. What is learned there is how The Twelve, and the ensuing destruction, came to be. Mr. Cronin is to be highly commended for developing such a plausible, probable and frighteningly timely back story for the world’s end. Amy and Anthony are patiently waiting in preparation for “what is to come,” Peter, Sara, Hollis, Michael and Greer discover what is required to continue life and living while holding the knowledge that the threat they faced has only been stalled, not defeated. The twenty years between the liberation and the Day of Zero are packed with the work of “getting on.” Routines are established, the desire to explore and settle new lands is birthed in the hearts of the survivors, a sense of familiarity begins to settle upon the 200,000 souls left in the new wilderness. Everything seems smooth on the surface, but rumbles are frequently felt. Throughout the years and within the lives of those who remain, there exists a Mystical Presence that seems to be directing events. Learning to sail, leads to a derelict ship that holds the promise of being a new Ark; homesteads are established with “hard boxes” that seem extravagant until their necessity is revealed; alliances are created that turn out to favor the powerless instead of the oppressors – all have the feel of being planned by Someone Other. I was struck by the theological concepts of hope, forgiveness, eternity, redemption and atonement that would pop-up at the most peculiar of moments (i.e., meadows filled with blooming wildflowers, wounded individuals choosing Grace over justice, identity exceeds appearance or name). Psychologically, Mr. Cronin paints a vivid picture of how powerful are the responses to love denied, guilt, self-loathing and healing relationships. The book ends 1000 years A.V. (After Virus), as the land once holding the United States was finally deemed safe enough to be explored. An account of The Great Catastrophe was recently discovered hidden on one of the Holy Isles (the birth place of humanity’s second chance) that suggested some eccentric occurrences that are being proven by the discovers made on the search of the old America. This account, written by one with no voice in order to speak of how humanity survived, has obtained the stature of Scripture and is serving as a road map for those doing the investigating of the recently forbidden lands. The person chosen to
Anonymous 4 months ago
A long wait to finish this trilogy and this is what we get? This was one of the most disappointing books i have ever read .
Anonymous 5 months ago
Justin Cronin's the Passage Trilogy is finally at an end with The City of Mirrors. Years, have gone by not only between volumes, but within the volumes. This is a series you do not want to put down but fortunately you can. Read a couple hundred pages, set it down, come back lat
Windbigler 5 months ago
Anonymous 5 months ago
It is completely and absolute ly predictable. I did like the background regarding Patient Zero though.
Anonymous 6 months ago
Very good character development from the first book in the trilogy series
Anonymous 7 months ago
Fantastic ending to a phenomenal series. I've never had a story give me so many goosebumps. I've never invested in characters like with this book. Bravo sir, BRAVO!
NooksterBS 7 months ago
747 pages of bliss! Why did it have to end? I waited for this and you delivered . I'M telling everyone to read all three books! I will never forget this series. I could not ask for a better ending, unless to ask that it didn't end. Wonderful !
Anonymous 8 months ago
I really enjoyed this series. It will be going on my reread list.
Anonymous 8 months ago
quibecca 8 months ago
SUCH A GREAT CONCLUSION TO AN AMAZING STORY!!! 5 WONDERFUL STARS I have been waiting for this book to come out since I finished book 2. I have love, love, loved this series. This was such a great conclusion to the trilogy! If you liked the first two books of this series, you will not be disappointed with this one. There is so much going on in this book. I listened to this because I loved the narrator so much on the first two. End of the world things are not my favorite but this series was so fantastic. I couldn't get enough of it. It took me a little while to finish, but so worth it. I think I didn't listen to it constantly so that I didn't have to end the series. The twelve are done with.....100 years have passed and those who survived have thrived. Built homes, families etc. We get to revisit some of the great characters from book one and two, and are introduced to some new ones in this book. They are realizing that the world can be great again, but it may take time, patience, and hard work. One man realizes that the land left in his family has a history to it. When he comes to realize what it all means, its fan freaking tastic. Seriously you need to read this series. I just loved it.
MKPMRP 8 months ago
This third book of the series was definitely worth the wait ! Once again the story moves forward with the continuing saga of of Amy, Zero and the Twelve. Another long read but well worth effort. If you haven't read the first two you better get started. This has been a wonderful adventure !
MKPMRP 8 months ago
This third book of the series was definitely worth the wait ! Once again the story moves forward with the continuing saga of of Amy, Zero and the Twelve. Another long read but well worth effort. If you haven't read the first two you better get started. This has been a wonderful adventure !
Anonymous 8 months ago