The City's Son [NOOK Book]

Overview

Hidden under the surface of everyday London is a city of monsters and miracles, where wild train spirits stampede over the tracks and glass-skinned dancers with glowing veins light the streets.

When a devastating betrayal drives her from her home, graffiti artist Beth Bradley stumbles into the secret city, where she finds Filius Viae, London’s ragged crown prince, just when he needs someone most. An ancient enemy has returned to the darkness ...
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The City's Son

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Overview

Hidden under the surface of everyday London is a city of monsters and miracles, where wild train spirits stampede over the tracks and glass-skinned dancers with glowing veins light the streets.

When a devastating betrayal drives her from her home, graffiti artist Beth Bradley stumbles into the secret city, where she finds Filius Viae, London’s ragged crown prince, just when he needs someone most. An ancient enemy has returned to the darkness under St. Paul’s Cathedral, bent on reigniting a centuries-old war, and Beth and Fil find themselves in a desperate race through a bizarre urban wonderland, searching for a way to save the city they both love.

The City’s Son is the first book of The Skyscraper Throne trilogy: a story about family, friends and monsters, and how you can’t always tell which is which.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In debut author Pollock’s alternately glittering and gritty urban fantasy, first in the Skyscraper Throne trilogy, London is a secret battleground between the forces of the god Reach, “the Crane King,” who would devastate the city with soulless and sterile urban development, and Mater Viae, “Our Lady of the Streets,” goddess of London’s teeming vermin—not just rats and feral cats, but also creatures made from masonry, electricity, and garbage. With the goddess mysteriously absent, her son, Filius, “a skinny boy wearing only a pair of filthy ripped jeans,” must oppose Reach, aided by his faithful trash monster, Gutterglass, and Beth Bradley, a delinquent teenager with a genius for graffiti and the courage to stand up to an angry, sentient locomotive. While there can be an overabundance of detail regarding the inner workings of Pollock’s modern-day London, the overall effect is that of a city transformed by ephemeral, incandescent magic. Gorgeously written and brimming with bizarre urban creatures, this darkly imagined and sometimes painful tale should delight fans of Neil Gaiman, China Miéville, and Holly Black. Ages 12–up. Agent: Amy Boggs, Donald Maass Literary Agency. (Sept.)
VOYA - Cheryl Clark
Ignored by her bereaved father and betrayed by her best friend, Beth turns to the streets of London, where she meets a boy with concrete-colored skin whose closest acquaintances are women made of light and an anthropomorphic pile of garbage. His name is Filius, and he is the son of a goddess. He is also building an army to wage war against a malign force called Reach, but it is only with Beth's help that he will be able to overcome his own fears and face his greatest enemy. Outrageous plot? Yes! Outlandish characters? Definitely! In the hands of a great novelist, these elements make readers eager to suspend their disbelief. Unfortunately, in this case, these devices just add up to a peculiar book. The book has several shortcomings. The antagonist symbolizes the contradictory concepts of both urban destruction and skyscraper construction. The human characters exhibit no surprise whatsoever when suddenly faced with phenomena that have no explanation. Furthermore, the characters that are supposed to intrinsically represent the city do not do so at all. How are figures trapped behind mirrors and babies born in statues symbolic of a metropolis? In a novel whose core is based on preposterous ideas, it is essential that all its elements emerge organically from the context. The City's Son fails at this. Add to that shifting verb tenses and ubiquitous British slang, and you have a novel that will probably struggle to find an audience willing to give it a chance. Reviewer: Cheryl Clark
Kirkus Reviews
A graffiti artist finds purpose in this most urban of urban fantasies. Beth, 16, flees expulsion, a broken friendship and a dysfunctionally grieving father straight into the arms of a ragged warrior. Filius Viae is the Son of the Streets, the only child of the goddess London. Filius was born into an eternal battle between the spirits of the city and their nemesis, the god of ceaseless growth. Beth joins the battle out of restlessness, but she stays for herself and her growing love for this strange other London of weevils and cockroaches, Pylon Spiders and feuding Lampfolk. The richly drawn setting evokes China Miéville's Un Lun Dun (2007); though Beth isn't as richly drawn as UnLondon's Deeba, she has her own scruffy charm. Her victories come through cocksure bravado, boldfaced cheek and the assurance that she's got nothing to lose. Beth's coming-of-age is presented in uneven, symbolic prose that sometimes overreaches, littering her tale with overwrought metaphor, but it also rises to poetry in its loving affection for London's filth and scars. A slow and dragging buildup is redeemed not just by the well-paced climax, but by the emerging heroism of the most unexpected characters. Ultimately, the density of this series opener pays off; the countless little details culminate in a satisfying resolution with no destined heroes, only individuals struggling along the best they can. (Fantasy. 13-16)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781623652807
  • Publisher: Quercus
  • Publication date: 11/5/2013
  • Series: Skyscraper Throne Trilogy
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 422
  • Sales rank: 759,472
  • File size: 850 KB

Meet the Author

Tom Pollock is a graduate of the Sussex University creative writing program, and a member of the London-based writers’ group The T-Party. He has lived everywhere from Scotland to Sumatra, but the peculiar magic of London has always drawn him back.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2013

    Wonderfully imaginative

    Completely novel world - loved it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 12, 2013

    I really tried to read it, but after i got through about 6 chapt

    I really tried to read it, but after i got through about 6 chapters, i was so confused i had to stop reading. so i started skipping ahead and skimming the book, and became even more confused as things went along. I got to the end, and was thoroughly disappointed, though it was a slightly happy ending though even that was a bit confusing. No, more than a bit. I don't know what to think of this book, but it says a lot if i just ended up skimming it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2012

    Anonymous

    I had to stop reading the discription when I got to the part aboit Beth being a graffiti artist. I'm sorry, but graffiti is not a profession and its definitly not art. Its vandilism. Simple as that.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

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