The Civil Rights Movement in American Memory / Edition 1

The Civil Rights Movement in American Memory / Edition 1

by David John Marley
     
 

ISBN-10: 0820328146

ISBN-13: 9780820328140

Pub. Date: 05/01/2006

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

The movement for civil rights in America peaked in the 1950s and 1960s; however, a closely related struggle, this time over the movement's legacy, has been heatedly engaged over the past two decades. How the civil rights movement is currently being remembered in American politics and culture—and why it matters—is the common theme of the thirteen essays in

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Overview

The movement for civil rights in America peaked in the 1950s and 1960s; however, a closely related struggle, this time over the movement's legacy, has been heatedly engaged over the past two decades. How the civil rights movement is currently being remembered in American politics and culture—and why it matters—is the common theme of the thirteen essays in this unprecedented collection.

Memories of the movement are being created and maintained—in ways and for purposes we sometimes only vaguely perceive—through memorials, art exhibits, community celebrations, and even street names. At least fifteen civil rights movement museums have opened since 1990; Mississippi Burning, Four Little Girls, and The Long Walk Home only begin to suggest the range of film and television dramatizations of pivotal events; corporations increasingly employ movement images to sell fast food, telephones, and more; and groups from Christian conservatives to gay rights activists have claimed the civil rights mantle.

Contests over the movement's meaning are a crucial part of the continuing fight against racism and inequality. These writings look at how civil rights memories become established as fact through museum exhibits, street naming, and courtroom decisions; how our visual culture transmits the memory of the movement; how certain aspects of the movement have come to be ignored in its "official" narrative; and how other political struggles have appropriated the memory of the movement. Here is a book for anyone interested in how we collectively recall, claim, understand, and represent the past.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780820328140
Publisher:
University of Georgia Press
Publication date:
05/01/2006
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
408
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsix
Introduction: The Struggle over Memoryxi
Part 1Institutionalizing Memory1
Interpreting the Civil Rights Movement: Contradiction, Confirmation, and the Cultural Landscape5
The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute and the New Ideology of Tolerance28
Street Names as Memorial Arenas: The Reputational Politics of Commemorating Martin Luther King Jr. in a Georgia County67
Narratives of Redemption: The Birmingham Church Bombing Trials and the Construction of Civil Rights Memory96
Part 2Visualizing Memory135
The Good, the Bad, and the Forgotten: Media Culture and Public Memory of the Civil Rights Movement137
Debating the Present through the Past: Representations of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1990s167
Integration as Disintegration: Remembering the Civil Rights Movement as a Struggle for Self-Determination in John Sayles's Sunshine State197
Restaging Revolution: Black Power, Vibe Magazine, and Photographic Memory220
Part 3Diverging Memory251
Down to Now: Memory, Narrative, and Women's Leadership in the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta, Georgia253
Engendering Movement Memories: Remembering Race and Gender in the Mississippi Movement290
Part 4Deploying Memory313
Deaf Rights, Civil Rights: The Gallaudet "Deaf President Now" Strike and Historical Memory of the Civil Rights Movement317
Riding in the Back of the Bus: The Christian Right's Adoption of Civil Rights Movement Rhetoric346
Rosa Parks, C'est Moi363
Selected Bibliography on Civil Rights and Historical Memory367
Contributors371
Index373

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