The Civil War and the Press

Overview

The power of the American press to influence and even set the political agenda is commonly associated with the rise of such press barons as Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst at the turn of the century. The latter even took credit for instigating the Spanish-American War. Their power, however, had deeper roots in the journalistic culture of the nineteenth century, particularly in the social and political conflicts that climaxed with the Civil War. Until now historians have paid little attention to the ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (6) from $41.97   
  • New (3) from $148.84   
  • Used (3) from $41.97   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$148.84
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(881)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new and unread! Join our growing list of satisfied customers!

Ships from: Phoenix, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$152.64
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(23411)

Condition: New
BRAND NEW

Ships from: Avenel, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$229.48
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(278)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

The power of the American press to influence and even set the political agenda is commonly associated with the rise of such press barons as Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst at the turn of the century. The latter even took credit for instigating the Spanish-American War. Their power, however, had deeper roots in the journalistic culture of the nineteenth century, particularly in the social and political conflicts that climaxed with the Civil War. Until now historians have paid little attention to the role of the press in defining and disseminating the conflicting views of the North and the South in the decades leading up to the Civil War. In The Civil War and the Press historians, political scientists, and scholars of journalism measure the influence of the press, explore its diversity, and profile the prominent editors and publishers of the day.

The book is divided into three sections covering the role of the press in the prewar years, throughout the conflict itself, and during the Reconstruction period. Part 1, "Setting the Agenda for Secession and War," considers the rise of the consumer society and the journalistic readership, the changing nature of editorial standards and practice, the issues of abolitionism, secession, and armed resistence as reflected in Northern and Southern newspapers, the reporting on John Brown's Harper's Ferry raid, and the influence of journalism on the 1860 election results. Part 2, "In Time of War," includes discussions of journalistic images and ideas of womanhood in the context of war, the political orientation of the Jewish press, the rise of illustrated periodicals, and issues of censorship and opposition journalism. The chapters in Part 3, "Reconstructing a Nation," detail the infiltration of the former Confederacy by hundreds of federally subsidized Republican newspapers, editorial reactions to the developing issue of voting rights for freed slaves, and the journalistic mythologization of Jesse James as a resister of Reconstruction laws and conquering Unionists.

In tracing the confluence of journalism and politics from its source, this groundbreaking volume opens a wide variety of perspectives on a crucial period in American history while raising questions that remain pertainent to contemporary tensions between press power and government power. The Civil War and the Press will be essential reading for historians, media studies specialists, political scientists, and readers interested in the Civil War period.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780765800084
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers
  • Publication date: 2/24/2000
  • Pages: 584
  • Product dimensions: 6.32 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

David B. Sachsman holds the George R. West, Jr. Chair of Excellence in Communication and Public Affairs at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, where he also serves as director of the annual Symposium on the 19th Century Press, the Civil War, and Free Expression. His books include Sensationalism, The Civil War and the Press, Environment Reporters in the 21st Century, and The Press and the Suburbs. He is the editor of Transaction’s Journalism series.

S. Kittrell Rushing is professor and head of the University of Tennessee Department of Communication.

Debra Reddin van Tuyll is assistant professor of communications at Augusta State University in Georgia.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Tables ix
Introduction xi
Part I. Setting the Agenda for Secession and War
1. Western Maryland Newspapers, 1820-1860: American Culture in Transition 3
2. Consensus and Public Debate: The Washington Press During the Nullification Crisis, 1832-1833 21
3. Mississippi Newspapers and the Secession Convention: The Influence on Anti-Secessionist Porter Jacob Myers 37
4. "John Brown Still Lives!": The Case of John Brown 49
5. Censorship, Racism and the Antebellum Press: Harper's Weekly Reports Harper's Ferry 63
6. Abolitionism at the Crossroads: Lydia Maria Child and the National Anti-Slavery Standard, 1841-1843 75
7. "I hear nothing about me now but politics -- slavery, and antislavery ad nauseam.": Paul Hamilton Hayne and the Editorial Policy of Russell's Magazine, 1857-1860 93
8. The Lion's Roar: Cassius Clay's The True American 107
9. Preserving a Denomination: The Promotion of Women by North Carolina's Antebellum Baptist Press 123
10. Mississippi's Fire-Eating Editor Ethelbert Barksdale and the Election of 1860 137
11. Agenda-Setting in Antebellum East Tennessee 147
12. Between Tradition and Innovation: The Nature of Antebellum News in the Courant 161
Part II. In Time of War
13. Edwin M. Stanton, the Inverted Pyramid, and Information Control 179
14. For Women and the War: A Cultural Analysis of the Mayflower, 1861-1864 209
15. Isaac Leeser and The Occident: A Jewish Leader's Response to the Civil War 227
16. The Albany Patriot, 1861-1865: Struggling to Publish and Struggling to Remain Optimistic 245
17. Images of Women in Civil War Newspapers: Leave the "Proper Sphere" 257
18. Two Men, Two Minds: An Examination of the Editorial Commentary of Two Georgia Editors During Sherman's March to the Sea 275
19. The Paradox of Samuel Medary, Copperhead Newspaper Publisher 291
20. Picturing the News: Frank Leslie and the Origins of American Pictorial Journalism 309
21. Jewish Press Coverage of an Anti-Semitic Act: Grant's Order No. 11 325
22. Visibility of Women in Newspaper Advertisements During the Civil War 349
23. Samuel Chester Reid, Jr.: Confederate Correspondent, 1861-1864 373
24. Devil to Clown: News Coverage of the Capture of Jefferson Davis 389
25. Journalistic Impedimenta: William Tecumseh Sherman and Free Expression 407
26. The Role of the First Lady and the Media: A Preliminary Case Study of New York Times Coverage of Mary Todd Lincoln, 1861-1865 419
27. Journalists First, Rebels Second: An Examination of Editorial Reaction to the President's Proposed Conscription of Newspapermen 437
28. Isaac Mayer Wise, The Israelite, and the Civil War 451
Part III. Reconstructing a Nation
29. Republican Newspapers and Freedom of the Press in the Reconstruction South, 1865-1877 473
30. Suffrage for Freedmen: The Specter of Dred Scott 485
31. The Michigan Democratic Press and the Fifteenth Amendment: A Divided Party United 503
32. Partisan News in the Early Reconstruction Era: Representations of African-Americans in Detroit's Daily Press 519
33. Wanted Dead or Alive: How Nineteenth Century Missouri Journalists Framed Jesse James 547
Index 571
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)