The Civil War: A Narrative, Volume 3: Red River to Appomattox

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Overview

Twenty years ago, in 1954, novelist Shelby Foote began this monumental work with these words: "It was a Monday in Washington, January 21; Jefferson Davis rose from his seat in the Senate..."

In the third — and last — volume of this vivid history, he brings to a close the story of four years of turmoil and strife which altered American life forever. Here, told in vivid narrative and as seen from both sides, are those climactic struggles, great and small, on and off the field of ...

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The Civil War: A Narrative, Volume 3: Red River to Appomattox

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Overview

Twenty years ago, in 1954, novelist Shelby Foote began this monumental work with these words: "It was a Monday in Washington, January 21; Jefferson Davis rose from his seat in the Senate..."

In the third — and last — volume of this vivid history, he brings to a close the story of four years of turmoil and strife which altered American life forever. Here, told in vivid narrative and as seen from both sides, are those climactic struggles, great and small, on and off the field of battle, which finally decided the fate of this nation.

"Red River to Appomattox" opens with the beginning of the two final, major confrontations of the war: Grant against Lee in Virginia, and Sherman pressing Johnston in North Georgia. While the Virginia-Georgia fighting is in progress, Kearsarge sinks the Alabama and Forrest gains new laurels at Brice's Crossroads.

With Grant and Lee deadlocked at Petersburg, Sherman takes Atlanta — assuring Lincoln's reelection, together with the certainty that the war will be fought (not negotiated) to a finish. These events are followed by Hood's bold northward strike through middle Tennessee while Sherman sets out on his march to the sea, to be opposed at its end by the ghost of the Army of Tennessee. Hood is wrecked by Thomas in front of Nashville-the last big battle — and Savannah falls to Sherman, who presents it to Lincoln as a Christmas gift.

Meantime, Early has threatened Washington, Price has toured Missouri, Farragut has damned the torpedoes in Mobile Bay, Forrest has raided Memphis, and Cushing has single-handedly sunk the Albemarle. And Sherman heads north through the Carolinas, burning Columbia en route, while Sheridan ripsthe entrails out of the Shenandoah Valley.

Lincoln's second inaugural sets the seal on these hostilities, invoking "charity for all" on the Eve of Five Forks and the Grant-Lee race for Appomattox. Here is the dust and stench of war, a sort of Twilight of the Gods, with occasional lurid flare-ups, mass desertions, and the queasiness that accompanies the risk of being the last man to die.

Then, penultimately. Lee at Appomattox, the one really shining figure in this last act.Davis's flight south from fallen Richmond overlaps Lincoln's death from Booth's derringer, and his capture at Irwinville comes amid the surrender of the last Confederate armies, east and west of the Mississippi River. The epilogue is Lincoln in his grave: and Davis in his posthumous existence. "Lucifer in Starlight."

So ends a unique achievement — already recognized as one of the finest histories ever fashioned by an American — a narrative of over a million and a half words which recreates on a vast and brilliant canvas the events and personalities of an American epic: The Civil War

Foote's comprehensive history of the Civil War includes three compelling volumes: Fort Sumter to Perryville, Fredericksburg to Meridian, and Red River to Appomattox.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Here, for a certainty, is one of the great historical narratives of our century, a unique and brilliant achievement, one that must be firmly placed in the ranks of the masters... a stirring and stupendous synthesis of history."

-- Van Allen Bradley, Chicago Daily News

"A grand, sweeping narrative... will continue to be read and remembered as a classic of its kind."

-- Richard N. Current, N.Y. Herald Tribune

The Civil War:

A Narrative

Fredericksburg to Meridian

"This, then, is narrative history -- a kind of history that goes back to an older literary tradition... The writing is superb ... one of the historical and literary achievements of our time."

-- T. Harry Williams, Book World

"The lucidity of the battle narratives, the vigor of the prose, the strong feeling for the men from generals to privates who did the fighting, are all controlled by a constant sense of how it happened and what it was all about. Foote has the novelist's feeling for character and situation, without losing the historian's scrupulous regard for recorded fact. The Civil War is likely to stand unequalled."

-- Walter Millis

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781441705594
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
  • Publication date: 11/1/2009
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged, 38 CDs
  • Pages: 35
  • Sales rank: 626,336
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 5.70 (h) x 2.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Shelby Foote was born on November 7, 1916 in Greenville, Mississippi, and attended school there until he entered the University of North Carolina. During World War II he served as a captain of field artillery but never saw combat. After World War II he worked briefly for the Associated Press in their New York bureau. In 1953 he moved to Memphis, where he lived for the remainder of his life.

Foote was the author of six novels: Tournament, Follow Me Down, Love in a Dry Season, Shiloh, Jordan County, and September, September. He is best remembered for his 3-volume history The Civil War: A Narrative, which took twenty years to complete and resulted in his being a featured expert in Ken Burns' acclaimed Civil War documentary. Over the course of his writing career, Foote was also awarded three Guggenheim fellowships.

Shelby Foote died in 2005 at the age of 88.

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Customer Reviews

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( 18 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2010

    Foote Excels -- As Always

    Shelby Foote, with Bruce Caton, sets the bar among Civil War historians. This book is amazingly detailed, yet absolutely NOT tedious or dry. He personalizes history without seeming biased. When it comes to Civil War history, give me Shelby or give me Bruce or give me Mechanics Illustrated.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2005

    Just Incredible

    This is the last and largest volume in Shelby Foote¿s narrative history of the Civil War. These books are absolutely outstanding. The book opens with the Red River campaign in 1864 and the defeat of union forces there much to the irritation of General Grant. Grant is a Lieutenant General, commanding all forces of the United States to close out the badly shattered rebellion. Grant marches the Army of the Potomac across the Rapidian in Virgina for a direct assault on Richmond. Although badly outnumbered over 2 to 1, Robert E. Lee demonstrates his tactical genius with a string of defensive holding actions and tactics in a series of battles ending in the famous Cold Harbor slaughter. Grant suffers ungodly casualties, but he never quits. Maneuvering to the south side of the James River, Grant reaches a nine month stalemate with Lee. Sherman is given command of the Armies of the West with the goal of capturing Atlanta and mopping up General Johnston of the CSA. In modern terms, Sherman rocks! And I mean Rocks! He maneuvers his enemy out of his way time and time again avoiding costly head on attacks. Sherman takes Atlanta, assuring Lincoln¿s re-election and the continuance of the war effort. Sherman conducts his infamous march of destruction through Georgia, South Carolina, and into North Carolina. Grant eventually breaks through Lee¿s over stretched works and winds up chasing the Army of Northern Virgina clear to Appomattox Courthouse. You probably know the rest: Lee surrenders, Lincoln is assassinated, and Davis is caught and imprisoned. This book simply tells the history of these times in such an entertaining and engaging way. I can¿t recommend the book enough as a must read for history buffs and casual readers alike. My review does not do credit to these great books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2013

    Good, but biased

    This work, along with the two previous books of this trilogy, is informative and well written, yet the author allows his anti-American, pro-confederacy ideals to taint the academic value of this work.

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