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The Civilization of Illiteracy
     

The Civilization of Illiteracy

4.5 4
by Mihai Nadin
 

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The spectacular but unsettling reality of faster cycles of change, breakdown of traditional values and institutions, and many other symptoms of technological innovation-what makes these necessary is the subject of this thought-provoking book. The answer to the failure of many seemingly eternal institutions-government, family, education-is not improvement in the

Overview

The spectacular but unsettling reality of faster cycles of change, breakdown of traditional values and institutions, and many other symptoms of technological innovation-what makes these necessary is the subject of this thought-provoking book. The answer to the failure of many seemingly eternal institutions-government, family, education-is not improvement in the traditional sense, but a fundamentally new perspective. The digital paradigm underlying the new civilization provides a basis for this perspective. But it will be misapplied unless understood within the broader framework of the driving forces behind human activity. All the good intentions of educators, scholars, politicians, and policymakers will fail if they do not recognize why literacy as a dominant framework of human activity is no longer adequate. The current dynamics of human activity is without precedent. It is not the result of technology, but of deeper forces of change.

Editorial Reviews

Philip L. Smith
"That knowledge is process and that students and teachers of all ages are partners in this process is what Nadin perceives education to be in the Civilization of Illiteracy. This is philosophy of education at its best".
E. Hirsh, Jr.
The Civilization of Illiteracy is a most impressive work which follows in the tradition of McLuhan in finding a post-literate culture now dominant, but the work transcends McLuhan in the breadth of ist learning and the depth of ist analysis. Clearly Nadin is a master scholar who has scarecely a peer in this field.
Jeffrey Nickerson
A stunning analysis that places literacy in a large mosaic-like context of signs, language, mediation, and work. Previous writing on literacy now seems simplistic. Instead of nostalgically bemoaning a lost golden age, Nadin shows how understanding literacy as a tool can explain the way it has developed, and what is coming in the future. He discusses the power of the visual-from drawings and diagrams through to cinema and digital television-and makes striking conclusions about how literacy is finding a new role in a world of many media for communication, expression, and work. The book is truly pragmatic. It discusses this phenomenon in the context of our changing society, our families, our diet, our sports, and our religion. The message will certainly have a dynamic effect on the reader, creating an image of the future that is both surprising and convincing.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940025678953
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

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The Civilization of Illiteracy 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The author is explaining what happens to us. The digital age started and we have problems understanding it. This is why I like the book. It explains. It argues. It is a book all libraries should carry.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you want to understand this age of change and instability you have to read this book. It is not easy reading. But it goes to the bottom of the many questions wse all face. It deals with digital technology without getting lost in the minutia of technical details. It deals with us, those who program and use machines, without repeating the stereotypes of user friendliness. Take your time. You will end up recommending the book to others.
Bradley Hull More than 1 year ago
isn't a book on illiteracy a bit irinic