The Clever Boy and the Terrible, Dangerous Animal

The Clever Boy and the Terrible, Dangerous Animal

5.0 2
by Idries Shah, Rose Mary Santiago
     
 

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A Sufi teaching tale of a boy who visits another village and helps the townspeople deal with their fear of something that they have mistaken for a terrible, dangerous animal.  See more details below

Overview

A Sufi teaching tale of a boy who visits another village and helps the townspeople deal with their fear of something that they have mistaken for a terrible, dangerous animal.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-This entertaining folktale is part of an oral tradition from the Middle East and Central Asia. A boy visits a neighboring village where he discovers a frightened crowd pointing to "a dangerous animal" in one of their fields. The youngster soon realizes that the large and terrifying object is a "MELON!" He proceeds to show the villagers that it can be eaten, and then they are fearful of him. He laughs at their silliness and their fear of the unknown, and convinces them that they can also plant its seeds and grow their own fruit. The strangers take his advice and soon their town is called Melon Village. The satisfying ending includes an illustration of the boy looking out onto fields full of melons. The colorful and humorously rendered illustrations bring this story to life. A great choice for anyone looking for a fun folktale with a positive message.-Diane Olivo-Posner, Long Beach Public Library, CA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
"This entertaining folktale is part of an oral tradition from the Middle East and Central Asia. ... The colorful and humorously rendered illustrations bring this story to life. A great choice for anyone looking for a fun folktale with a positive message."
-The School Library Journal

"... the meanings will linger in young minds, helping children understand their own and others' actions." -- Denise Nessel, Ph.D., Senior Consultant, National Urban Alliance for Effective Education

"Enjoy ... new bright collections featuring different illustrators ... fine stories!"
-- REVIEWER'S CHOICE, The Children's Bookwatch

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781883536510
Publisher:
I S H K
Publication date:
06/28/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
3 - 8 Years

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The Clever Boy and the Terrible, Dangerous Animal 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Tragedies like Columbine are a wake-up call. It's clear that we need to provide our kids ¿ especially boys ¿ with tools to counter the violence and automatic aggression ubiquitous in popular culture. These children's stories by Idries Shah are just this kind of tool. They're not preachy. They don't offer simplistic lessons or moral platitudes. They're more like exercises for 'mental muscle groups' grossly underdeveloped in this culture: A strong sense of one's own value. Empathy. Flexibility in thinking and responding. Appreciating that not everyone is the same, not every outcome is predictable. Seeing that there are more than two sides to a situation. A sense that patience and perseverance can pay off, sometimes in unexpected ways. Not demanding easy answers. A sense that things are not always as they seem, that the viewpoint of 'experts' ¿ or even the whole community ¿ is not always right. The experience of seeing something that even adults don't see, of creating clever solutions. The sense that taking positive action is possible and rewarding¿even when one has to buck the tide. That help can come from where and when we least expect it. The sense that life has interesting 'loose ends' for us to reflect on. And so much more. At least one of these books should be on every child's book shelf.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This beautifully illustrated book, part of a children¿s series by Idries Shah, is sure to delight kids and parents alike. Based on a tale told for centuries in Central Asia and the Middle East, it is about a boy who happens upon a village where the people are terrified of melons simply because they¿ve never seen one before. In showing the villagers that their fears are unfounded, the boy teaches children some valuable lessons about fear. Yet unlike so many other children¿s books, THE CLEVER BOY AND THE TERRIBLE, DANGEROUS ANIMAL doesn¿t impose its lessons on the young reader, but instead gently offers them to be digested and understood at the child¿s own pace. I wish there were more children¿s books like this one and the others in Shah¿s series.