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Clones of Dr. Funkenstein
     

The Clones of Dr. Funkenstein

5.0 1
by Parliament
 

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Come 1976, and Parliament got up to its usual tricks in that particular incarnation -- right down to opening backwards-masked vocal weirdness plus sci-fi scenarios in the "Prelude," where "funk is its own reward." With Bernie Worrell and Fred Wesley splitting the horn arrangements and

Overview

Come 1976, and Parliament got up to its usual tricks in that particular incarnation -- right down to opening backwards-masked vocal weirdness plus sci-fi scenarios in the "Prelude," where "funk is its own reward." With Bernie Worrell and Fred Wesley splitting the horn arrangements and Clinton and Bootsy Collins taking care of the rest, the result is a concept album of sorts you can dance to. The clones get up and do their thing throughout, and if it's not The Wall, then that's all to its benefit. The immediate downside of Clones is that it's a fairly one-note record -- every groove can just about be exchanged for any other one, unlike the wider variety apparent on other releases. Given Clinton and company's sheer work rate, something likely had to give and this is one of the stress points. There are a couple of stronger songs -- "I've Been Watching You (Move Your Sexy Body)" is classic slow jam territory. Not exactly Barry White, but hearing Parliament tone it down just enough pays off, especially with Worrell's drowsy, sensuous horn charts. "Funkin' for Fun," meanwhile, brings the album to a strong, lively end, with just enough in the call-and-response vocals and horns to spark some extra energy into the proceedings. As is the case with most mid- to late-'70s Parliament, things may not be as deep as what was done as Funkadelic, but only those who always explicitly value lyrical worth have any cause to complain. Listening to the silly squeals and burbles on "Dr. Funkenstein" itself is pure fun with sound, while the good doctor's speech is scientific craziness. As one voice says out of nowhere, "Kiss me on my ego!" Special bonus -- the utterly goofball cover photo, one of P-Funk's best.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/18/1990
Label:
Mercury
UPC:
0042284262026
catalogNumber:
842620
Rank:
24078

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Parliament   Primary Artist
Bernie Worrell   Synthesizer,Keyboards
Michael Brecker   Horn
Eddie Hazel   Guitar,Vocals
Maceo Parker   Horn
Bootsy Collins   Bass,Guitar,Percussion,Drums,Vocals
Jerome Brailey   Percussion,Drums
Randy Brecker   Horn
George Clinton   Vocals
Glen Collins   Guitar,Vocals
Gary "Mudbone" Cooper   Percussion,Drums,Vocals
Raymond Davis   Vocals
Rick Gardner   Horn
Glen Goins   Guitar,Vocals
Michael Hampton   Guitar,Vocals
Clarence "Fuzzy" Haskins   Vocals
Taka Khan   Vocals
Cordell Mosson   Bass
Garry Shider   Guitar,Vocals
Calvin Simon   Vocals
Grady Thomas   Vocals
Fred Wesley   Horn
Debbie Edwards   Vocals

Technical Credits

Bernie Worrell   Arranger,Composer,Horn Arrangements
Bootsy Collins   Arranger,Composer,rhythm arrangement
Jerome Brailey   Composer
Jim Callon   Engineer
George Clinton   Arranger,Composer,Producer,Artwork,rhythm arrangement
Glen Goins   Composer
Garry Shider   Composer
Jim Vitti   Engineer
Fred Wesley   Arranger,Horn Arrangements
Chris Whorf   Art Direction

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Clones of Dr. Funkenstein 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
THE CLONES OF DR. FUNKENSTEIN is essential P-Funk for any Parliament/Funkadelic listener. GEORGE CLINTON's chops are tight on this album. He has a beautiful voice."Gettin To Know You" and "Funkin For Fun" are a good display of his vocal range. The horn arrangements by Fred Wesley are just plain dynamite. This is one of the all-time great horn funk albums.