The Collected Works

( 4 )

Overview

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

For the first time, all the major works of this beloved writer are gathered together in one hardcover volume.

Poet, artist, and mystic, Kahlil Gibran was born in 1883 to a poor Christian family in Lebanon and immigrated to the United States as an adolescent. His masterpiece, The Prophet, a book of poetic essays that he began while still a youth in Lebanon, is one of the most cherished books of our time and has sold millions of copies in more than ...

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Overview

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

For the first time, all the major works of this beloved writer are gathered together in one hardcover volume.

Poet, artist, and mystic, Kahlil Gibran was born in 1883 to a poor Christian family in Lebanon and immigrated to the United States as an adolescent. His masterpiece, The Prophet, a book of poetic essays that he began while still a youth in Lebanon, is one of the most cherished books of our time and has sold millions of copies in more than twenty languages since its publication in 1923. But all of Gibran’s works—essays, stories, parables, and prose poems—are imbued with equally powerful simplicity and wisdom, whether they are addressing marriage or children, friendship or grief, work or pleasure. Perhaps no other twentieth-century writer has touched the hearts and minds of so remarkably varied and widespread a readership.

Included in this volume are The Prophet, The Wanderer, Jesus the Son of Man, A Tear and a Smile, Spirits Rebellious, Nymphs of the Valley, Prose Poems, The Garden of the Prophet, The Earth Gods, Sand and Foam, The Forerunner, and The Madman.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“[Kahlil Gibran] speaks about fundamental things—those which are, or should be, a part of every human life—love, giving, food and drink, work, sorrow and joy, children, clothes and housing, buying and selling, crime and punishment, freedom, reason and passion, self-knowledge, teaching, friendship, talking, good and evil, prayer, pleasure, beauty, religion and death . . . Like most wisdom, most of what he has to tell is ancient, the possession of all men who have thought much and hard about fundamental things . . . But on it all there is also the imprint of a rich and unusual personality . . . Gibran offers no short-cuts to happiness, no easily mastered formulae for successful living. Essentially, he bids you look closely into your own heart and mind.”

—NEW YORK TIMES

Library Journal

When the secret history of the 20th century in America is written, and we have access to that true inner life, we shall see the prominence of the poets readers really loved, not the poets they were told to admire or pretended to understand: Edgar Guest, Sara Teasdale, and Gibran, whose words used to be heard at thousands of weddings and high occasions every year; only Rumi (interestingly, another Middle Eastern mystic) has begun to challenge Gibran's primacy in the American imagination. Born to a Maronite Catholic family in Lebanon in the 1880s, Gibran came to this country when he was 12 years old, where his undoubted talent as an artist attracted the attention of a succession of patrons; he studied briefly with no less a titan than Rodin. He began to write-his paintings and sketches increasingly served as oblique illustrations for his work-in a style that equally recalled the New Testament and Whitman, as his paintings faintly echoed Blake and Simeon Solomon. The steady triumph of his fourth work in English, The Prophet, is part of the success story of the then-young publishing company Alfred A. Knopf, and this year Knopf has given Gibran the loving, acid-free treatment, collecting all his English works into one handsome volume.

It is fashionable to deride Gibran as a poet, and at length, his pseudo-Authorized Version, para-Arabian Nightsvoice is indeed exhausting-but his counsel is far from pernicious. We forget how Christian he was-one lengthy work in this volume, Jesus the Son of Man, is nothing less than a polychoral fictional biography of Jesus. Gibran is just alien enough for enchantment, like Valentino's sheik; the bible of the unchurched, he gives usa kind of gospel without difficulty, Christianity without sharp edges. His poetic sensibility is very much that of the fin de siecle; in him, the aesthetic dreams of the 1890s go on and on into the 21st century. We may know The Prophettoo well to love it now, but the aphorisms of the earlier volumes, The Madmanand The Forerunner, reward reading-they give us Gibran almost Nietzschean in his spikiness and humor, before high solemnity overtook him. Whether or not he is a Yeats or a Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Gibran is hugely important, and this handsome book is essential for all collections.


—Staff
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307267078
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/23/2007
  • Pages: 888
  • Sales rank: 134,449
  • Product dimensions: 5.22 (w) x 8.27 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Kahlil Gibran was born in 1883 in Lebanon and died in New York in 1931. His family emigrated to the United States in 1895. In his early teens, the artistry of Gibran's drawings caught the eye of his teachers and he was introduced to the avant-garde Boston artist, photographer, and publisher Fred Holland Day, who encouraged and supported Gibran in his creative endeavors. A publisher used some of Gibran's drawings for book covers in 1898, and Gibran held his first art exhibition in 1904 in Boston. In 1908, Gibran went to study art with Auguste Rodin in Paris for two years. He later studied art in Boston. While most of Gibran's early writing was in Arabic, most of his work published after 1918 was in English. Gibran's best-known work is The Prophet, a book composed of 26 poetic essays.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 4 of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 6, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Beyond The Prophet

    Many read The Prophet in high school and find it inspiring. Gibran has much more to offer. The Madman, The Forerunner, and The Wanderer are made of parables, each of which enjoin meditation and focus. Many more aphorisms, parables, and poems make this collection of Gibran deep cuts worthy of any peaceful reading place and time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted May 6, 2010

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