The Collected Works of Chogyam Trungpa: Volume Seven: The Art of Calligraphy (Excerpts); Dharma Art; Visual Dharma (Excerpts); Selected Poems; Selected Writings

The Collected Works of Chogyam Trungpa: Volume Seven: The Art of Calligraphy (Excerpts); Dharma Art; Visual Dharma (Excerpts); Selected Poems; Selected Writings

by Chogyam Trungpa
     
 

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The Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa brings together in eight volumes the writings of one of the first and most influential and inspirational Tibetan teachers to present Buddhism in the West. Organized by theme, the collection includes full-length books as well as articles, seminar transcripts, poems, plays, and interviews, many of which have never

Overview

The Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa brings together in eight volumes the writings of one of the first and most influential and inspirational Tibetan teachers to present Buddhism in the West. Organized by theme, the collection includes full-length books as well as articles, seminar transcripts, poems, plays, and interviews, many of which have never before been available in book form. From memoirs of his escape from Chinese-occupied Tibet to insightful discussions of psychology, mind, and meditation; from original verse and calligraphy to the esoteric lore of tantric Buddhism—the impressive range of Trungpa's vision, talents, and teachings is showcased in this landmark series.

Volume Seven features the work of Chögyam Trungpa as a poet, playwright, and visual artist and his teachings on art and the creative process, which are among the most innovative and provocative aspects of his activities in the West. While it includes material in which Trungpa Rinpoche shares his knowledge of the symbolism and iconography of traditional Buddhist arts (in Visual Dharma), this richly varied volume primarily focuses on his own, often radical creative expressions. The Art of Calligraphy is a wonderful showcase for his calligraphy, and Dharma Art brings together his ideas on art, the artistic process, and aesthetics. Tibetan poetics, filmmaking, theater, and art and education are among the topics of the selected writings.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780834821569
Publisher:
Shambhala Publications, Inc.
Publication date:
09/28/2010
Series:
Shambhala Publications
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
7 MB

Read an Excerpt

From
Selected Poems

International
Affairs of 1979: Uneventful but Energy-Consuming

Maybe
Julius Caesar was right,

Organizing straight Roman roads throughout Europe.

Had the nose of Cleopatra been a different shape,

History might have changed.

This year is quite uneventful,

Regurgitating over and over that the nations have no

 
       chance to chew and eat a good meal.

The success of Joe Clark is replacement,

Adopting dog instead of cat as house pet in the

 
       Canadian Parliament.

FareweIl to Pierre Trudeau;

His invitation to visit Tibet was comparable to the

 
       second visit of Nixon to China.

The pontiff's messages and declarations of goodwill

 
       are like having a pancake:

We know syrup will come along.

It is time for the Christians to unite:

Maybe the clean-shaven Catholics could join with the

 
       bearded Eastern church.

Margaret
Thatcher's prime ministership was

 
       frightening,

But turns out to be not so feisty.

We are reassured that she decided to wear a skirt as

 
       opposed to trousers—

What a relief.

Tories always tame ladies,

And the Liberals and Labor party wish they had a she-

 
       leader who could wear breeches.

However,
England will be always England:

When she is sad, she becomes tough;

When she is tough, she becomes soft.

Good old glory is fading,

And now they refer to the kingdom as ruled by

 
       Britannia, as opposed to Elizabeth the Second.

We are sad at the death of Uncle Dicky;

He was such a good person, but he had to pay his

 
       karmic debt:

Instead of being killed on board the ship
Kelly,
He was destroyed on a fishing boat—

May he be reborn as a Shambhalian warrior.

Vietnam invasion of Cambodia,

China invasion of Vietnam:

All of those jokes are comparable to a group of lizards

 
       biting each others' tails.

Where is the spirit of communism?

Marx,
Engels, Lenin—

If they returned and saw what a mess they made in the

 
       universe, they would be horrified.

We find nobody is practicing true communism.

The
Chinese declaration of religious freedom in Tibet

 
       is humorous:

You are free not to practice religion,

And the Panchen Lama beckons the Dalai Lama.

Opening the door of Sino-Tibetan tourism fooled the

 
       sharpest and professional journalists;

They lost their critical intelligence.

Islamic tradition is fantastic:

"Killing enemy, develop wealth in the name of Allah."

The grand Ayatollah declares spiritual principles in the

 
       name of hate,

Recapturing the example of
Jaws.
Sino-American declaration is sweet and sour,

Missing the Hunan beef of Mao Tse-tung,

Both parties not knowing how to handle their power;

Taiwan takes secret delight that it

does not have to

 
       maintain international law and order.

Korea lost its leader,

Park killed in a parking lot by his own security guards;

Unifying
South and North Chao Xian to make Korea

 
       out of Korea is questionable.

In short, the nations are capitalizing on what they

 
       were;

In turn they lose what they are.

This year is not an exciting year at all,

In spite of short dramas and quick exchanges.

There could be an exciting perspective to it:

Declaration of war between Islam and the rest of the

 
       faiths.

The
Shah as
le
chat
got out of the bag,

Terrified,
frustrated—we feel sorry for the Empress

 
       Farah.

We realize that the United Nations is a rib cage

 
       without heartbeat or lungs,

Trying to do its best.

In spite of China being chairman of the Security

 
       Council,

Nothing gets done.

We are sad;

It is hopeless.

We are happy;

We could contribute.

The state of affairs of the world is somewhat better

 
       than a male dog pissing on an appropriate bush.

January
1, 1980

The
Kalapa Court

Boulder,
Colo.

Meet the Author

The compiler and editor of The Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa, Carolyn Rose Gimian has been editing the works of Chögyam Trungpa for more than twenty-five years. She is the founding director of the Shambhala Archives, the archival repository for Chögyam Trungpa's work in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Chögyam Trungpa (1940–1987)—meditation master, teacher, and artist—founded Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, the first Buddhist-inspired university in North America; the Shambhala Training program; and an international association of meditation centers known as Shambhala International. He is the author of numerous books, including Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior, Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism, and The Myth of Freedom.

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