The Collected Works of Chogyam Trungpa: Volume Seven: The Art of Calligraphy (Excerpts); Dharma Art; Visual Dharma (Excerpts); Selected Poems; Selected Writings [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa brings together in eight volumes the writings of one of the first and most influential and inspirational Tibetan teachers to present Buddhism in the West. Organized by theme, the collection includes full-length books as well as articles, seminar transcripts, poems, plays, and interviews, many of which have never before been available in book form. From memoirs of his escape from Chinese-occupied Tibet to insightful discussions of psychology, mind, and meditation; from ...

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The Collected Works of Chogyam Trungpa: Volume Seven: The Art of Calligraphy (Excerpts); Dharma Art; Visual Dharma (Excerpts); Selected Poems; Selected Writings

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Overview

The Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa brings together in eight volumes the writings of one of the first and most influential and inspirational Tibetan teachers to present Buddhism in the West. Organized by theme, the collection includes full-length books as well as articles, seminar transcripts, poems, plays, and interviews, many of which have never before been available in book form. From memoirs of his escape from Chinese-occupied Tibet to insightful discussions of psychology, mind, and meditation; from original verse and calligraphy to the esoteric lore of tantric Buddhism—the impressive range of Trungpa's vision, talents, and teachings is showcased in this landmark series.

Volume Seven features the work of Chögyam Trungpa as a poet, playwright, and visual artist and his teachings on art and the creative process, which are among the most innovative and provocative aspects of his activities in the West. While it includes material in which Trungpa Rinpoche shares his knowledge of the symbolism and iconography of traditional Buddhist arts (in Visual Dharma), this richly varied volume primarily focuses on his own, often radical creative expressions. The Art of Calligraphy is a wonderful showcase for his calligraphy, and Dharma Art brings together his ideas on art, the artistic process, and aesthetics. Tibetan poetics, filmmaking, theater, and art and education are among the topics of the selected writings.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780834821569
  • Publisher: Shambhala Publications, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/28/2010
  • Series: Shambhala Publications
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 8 MB

Meet the Author

The compiler and editor of The Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa, Carolyn Rose Gimian has been editing the works of Chögyam Trungpa for more than twenty-five years. She is the founding director of the Shambhala Archives, the archival repository for Chögyam Trungpa's work in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Chögyam Trungpa (1940–1987)—meditation master, teacher, and artist—founded Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, the first Buddhist-inspired university in North America; the Shambhala Training program; and an international association of meditation centers known as Shambhala International. He is the author of numerous books, including Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior, Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism, and The Myth of Freedom.

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Read an Excerpt

From
Selected Poems

International
Affairs of 1979: Uneventful but Energy-Consuming

Maybe
Julius Caesar was right,

Organizing straight Roman roads throughout Europe.

Had the nose of Cleopatra been a different shape,

History might have changed.

This year is quite uneventful,

Regurgitating over and over that the nations have no

 
       chance to chew and eat a good meal.

The success of Joe Clark is replacement,

Adopting dog instead of cat as house pet in the

 
       Canadian Parliament.

FareweIl to Pierre Trudeau;

His invitation to visit Tibet was comparable to the

 
       second visit of Nixon to China.

The pontiff's messages and declarations of goodwill

 
       are like having a pancake:

We know syrup will come along.

It is time for the Christians to unite:

Maybe the clean-shaven Catholics could join with the

 
       bearded Eastern church.

Margaret
Thatcher's prime ministership was

 
       frightening,

But turns out to be not so feisty.

We are reassured that she decided to wear a skirt as

 
       opposed to trousers—

What a relief.

Tories always tame ladies,

And the Liberals and Labor party wish they had a she-

 
       leader who could wear breeches.

However,
England will be always England:

When she is sad, she becomes tough;

When she is tough, she becomes soft.

Good old glory is fading,

And now they refer to the kingdom as ruled by

 
       Britannia, as opposed to Elizabeth the Second.

We are sad at the death of Uncle Dicky;

He was such a good person, but he had to pay his

 
       karmic debt:

Instead of being killed on board the ship
Kelly,
He was destroyed on a fishing boat—

May he be reborn as a Shambhalian warrior.

Vietnam invasion of Cambodia,

China invasion of Vietnam:

All of those jokes are comparable to a group of lizards

 
       biting each others' tails.

Where is the spirit of communism?

Marx,
Engels, Lenin—

If they returned and saw what a mess they made in the

 
       universe, they would be horrified.

We find nobody is practicing true communism.

The
Chinese declaration of religious freedom in Tibet

 
       is humorous:

You are free not to practice religion,

And the Panchen Lama beckons the Dalai Lama.

Opening the door of Sino-Tibetan tourism fooled the

 
       sharpest and professional journalists;

They lost their critical intelligence.

Islamic tradition is fantastic:

"Killing enemy, develop wealth in the name of Allah."

The grand Ayatollah declares spiritual principles in the

 
       name of hate,

Recapturing the example of
Jaws.
Sino-American declaration is sweet and sour,

Missing the Hunan beef of Mao Tse-tung,

Both parties not knowing how to handle their power;

Taiwan takes secret delight that it

does not have to

 
       maintain international law and order.

Korea lost its leader,

Park killed in a parking lot by his own security guards;

Unifying
South and North Chao Xian to make Korea

 
       out of Korea is questionable.

In short, the nations are capitalizing on what they

 
       were;

In turn they lose what they are.

This year is not an exciting year at all,

In spite of short dramas and quick exchanges.

There could be an exciting perspective to it:

Declaration of war between Islam and the rest of the

 
       faiths.

The
Shah as
le
chat
got out of the bag,

Terrified,
frustrated—we feel sorry for the Empress

 
       Farah.

We realize that the United Nations is a rib cage

 
       without heartbeat or lungs,

Trying to do its best.

In spite of China being chairman of the Security

 
       Council,

Nothing gets done.

We are sad;

It is hopeless.

We are happy;

We could contribute.

The state of affairs of the world is somewhat better

 
       than a male dog pissing on an appropriate bush.

January
1, 1980

The
Kalapa Court

Boulder,
Colo.

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Table of Contents

Introduction to Volume Seven

xv

DHARMA
ART

Acknowledgments 3
Editor's
Introduction
5
Dharma
Art—Genuine Art
13
Discovering
Elegance
15
Great
Eastern Sun
20
Basic
Goodness
26
Meditation 31
Art in Everyday Life
37
Ordinary
Truth
44
Empty
Gap of Mind
49
Coloring
Our World
56
New
Sight
80
The
Process of Perception
84
Being and Projecting
88
Lost
Horizons
90
Giving 94
Self-Existing
Humor
98
Outrageousness 101
Wise
Fool
106
Five
Styles of Creative Expression
112
Nobody's
World
117
Choiceless
Magic
121
One
Stroke
128
The
Activity of Nonaggression
132
State of Mind
135
Heaven,
Earth, and Man
141
Endless
Richness
145
Back to Square One
149
Art
Begins at Home
157
Sources 161

THE
ART OF CALLIGRAPHY:

JOINING
HEAVEN AND EARTH

Introduction by David I. Rome
165
Heaven,
Earth, and Man
179
1.
Dharma and Art
179
2.
Creation
184
3.
Perception
186
4.
The Mandala of the Four Karmas
192
5.
Discipline
202
6.
Art and Society
212
Selected
Calligraphies
217
Appendix:
About the Seals
246
Notes 252
Sources 255
Selected
Chronology
256

VISUAL
DHARMA:

THE
BUDDHIST ART OF TIBET

Introduction 261
Visual
Dharma: The Buddhist Art of Tibet
263
Background and History
263
Elements of Iconography
268
Five
Buddha Families
277

SELECTED
POEMS

Full
Moon No Clouds
283
The
Spontaneous Song of Entering into the Blessings and Profound Samaya of the Only
Father Guru
284
A
Son of Buddha
286
Stray
Dog
288
Garuda
Is the Mighty Force
289
The
Song of the Wanderer
290
May the Great Revolutionary Banner
291
The
Wind of Karma
292
Poem 293
Listen,
Listen
294
Three-Bladed
Missile
295
Whistling
Grasses of the Esk Valley
297
This
Marriage
299
Song 301
In the North of the Sky
303
Good-bye and Welcome
306
Meteoric
Iron Mountain
307
The
Zen Teacher
309
American
Good Intentions,
310
First
Thought
313
Samsara and Nirvana
315
Gain and Loss
317
Cynical
Letter
319
Dignified
Rocky Mountain
321
Charnel
Ground
322
Philosopher
Fool
323
Does
Love Kill Anybody?
325
Our
Seduction
327
A
Letter to Marpa
328
Aphorisms 331
The
Nameless Child
333
The
Myth of Freedom
335
Haiku 337
The
Red Flag Flies
338
The
Sword of Hatred
339
Silk
Road
341
Tibetan
Pilgrim
342
Trans
World Air 343

A
Flower Is Always Happy
344
True
Tantra Groupie
345
Glorious
Bhagavad-Ghetto
347
Tail of the Tiger
349
Naropa
Institute, 1974
350
Pema
Yumtso
356
To
Britain's Health 359

Lion
Roars Sunset over Rockies' East Slope
362
Supplication to the Emperor
372
Literal
Mathematics
375
One
Way
377
Shasta
Road
378
Palm
Is
380
Burdensome 382
Tsöndrü
Namltha
383
Pema
Semma
385
Dying
Laughing
387
Ktinga
Garma
389
1111
Pearl Street: Victory Chatter
393
Wait and Think 395

Missing the Point
397
RMDC,
Route 1, Livermore
399
To
Gesar of Ling
401
Love's
Fool
402
Report from Loveland
404
Testimonial 407
1018
Spruce Street (and K.A.)
408
1135
10th Street (and G.M.)
411
1111
Pearl Street (and D.S.)
413
78
Fifth Avenue
414
The
Alden (and Thomas Frederick)
417
Commentary on "The Alden (and Thomas Frederick)"
420
Aurora
7 (#1)
425
Aurora
7 (#2)
427
1111
Pearl Street: Off Beat
429
Aurora
7 (and Nyingje Sheltri)
431
Shambhala
Anthem
434
Pan-American
Dharmadhatu III
436
So
Bright and So Vulnerable
438
Glory
Be to the Kasung
439
Tibetan
Lyrics
441
Asleep and Awake
442
Conspicuous
Gallantry
443
Great
Eastern Daughterlet 446

Whycocomagh?
447
Lion's
Roar
449
Halifax 450
Latest
Early Conclusion
451
Timely
Rain
454
Pan-Dharmadollar 455
Meetings with Remarkable People
459
International
Affairs: The Cosmic Joke of 1977
462
One
Sound
467
Dixville
Notch: Purrington House (and C.F.)
468
Afterthought 472
Anniversary 473
Don't
Confuse This for Trick-or-Treat
474
Eternal
Guest
479
Swallowing the Sun and Moon without Leaving the World in Darkness: Good Lady of Wisdom
480
Saddharma
Punsters
483
Falling in Love with a Pair of Handcuffs
486
I
Miss You So Much
489
The
Doha of Confidence: Sad Song of the Four Remembrances
491
Bon
Voyage
493
Memorial in Verse
494
To
My Son
497
For
Anne Waldman
498
As
Long as the Sky Is Blue
499
Putting
Up with the Trans-Canada
500
Buddhism in the Canadian Rockies
502
Praise to the Lady of the Big Heart
506
Not
Deceiving the Earth (and M.S.N.)
507
Maestoso
Drala
509
Trooping the Color
512
Drunken
Elephant
513
Limp and Talk
514
How to Know No
515
International
Affairs of 1979: Uneventful but Energy-Consuming
519
To the Noble Sangha
523
Auspicious
Coincidence: Wealth and Vision
524
Fishing
Wisely 526

Good
Morning within the Good Morning
527
Haiku
2
529
Miscellaneous
Doha
532
Exposé:
Acknowledging Accusations in the Name of Devotion

533

Mixed
Grill Dharma Served with Burgundy of Ground Mahamudra 1980 Vintage: The Elegant
Feast of Timeless Accuracy
536
Growing
Pains Are Over
539
Coming of Age of My Son Mantric Keltic Incantation
543
Merrier
Than the Maritimes
545
La
Conference du Soleil du Grand Est
548
Turning
Point
551
You
Might Be Tired of the Seat That You Deserve
552
When
I Ride a Horse
554
Hunting the Setting-Sun Moon
555
Timely
Innuendo
557
Why
Reality Is So Real
558
Fearlessness and Joy Are Truly Yours
559
A
Heart Lost and Discovered
561
Command 562
Golden
Sun
563
As
Skylarks Hunt for Their Prey
564
How to Be Old Shambhalians and Youthful Propagators of

Shambhala 565
How
Typical Student Poetry Should Be
567
Death or Life
570
Early
Testimony: Sun Will Never Set
571
Warmth in the House
573
Don't
Go to the Dentist with Such Good Teeth
574
Natural
Sanctuary without Shrine
576
Child's
Concept of Death 577

Battle
Cry
578
Farewell to Boulder
579
Sanity
Is Joyful
582
Shambhala
Is True
583
Embryonic
Thunderbolt
585
How to Govern with Wisdom
586
Seasons'
Greetings
587
Dance while Weeping
588
Four
Season Haiku Tiger
590
The
Meek: Powerfully Nonchalant and Dangerously Self-Satisfying 591

Swallowing the Moon as We Feel Free
593
Constantly
Falling in Love
594
Never
Flinching
595
Pure and Powerful as Peonies
597
Sound
Cycles

 
     Trishula
598
 
     Sutra
598
 
     Aham
599
Elocution
Exercises

Instead of Americanism, Speak the English Language Properly!
600
Humor and Delight with the English Language
600

Playing with the English Language
601

SELECTED
WRITINGS

Preface to First Thought Best Thought
605
Poets'
Colloquium
608
Poetics 631
Tibetan
Poetics
634
Visual
Dharma: Film Workshop on the Tibetan Buddhist View of Aesthetics and Filmmaking
638
Prajna 654
Proclamation 662
Basic
Sanity in Theater
667
Heaven,
Earth, and Man 669

Perception and the Appreciation of Reality
683
Art of Simplicity: "Discovering Elegance"
686
Dharma
Art Stresses Harmony and Elegance
691
Art and Education
697
Empowerment 704
Introduction to Disciples of the Buddha
709

Appendices
Introduction to
First
Thought
Best
Thought

by Allen Ginsberg 719

Editor's
Preface to
First
Thought
Best
Thought

by David I. Rome
727
Editor's
Afterword to
Timely
Rain

by David I. Rome
731
Sources 739
Acknowledgments
751

A
Biography of
Chögyam
Trungpa

755

Books by Chögyam Trungpa

761

Resources
767

Index
771

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