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The Collected Works of W.B. Yeats Vol X: Later Article: Uncollected Articles, Reviews, and Radio Broadcast

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Overview

The Collected Works of W. B. Yeats, Volume X: Later Articles and Reviews is part of a fourteen-volume series under the general editorship of eminent Yeats scholars Richard J. Finneran and George Mills Harper. This first complete edition includes virtually all of the Nobel laureate's published work, in authoritative texts and with extensive explanatory notes.

Later Articles and Reviews consists of fifty-four prose pieces published between 1900 and Yeats's death in January 1939 ...

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The Collected Works of W.B. Yeats Vol X: Later Article: Uncollected Articles, Reviews, and Radio Broadcasts Written After 1900

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Overview

The Collected Works of W. B. Yeats, Volume X: Later Articles and Reviews is part of a fourteen-volume series under the general editorship of eminent Yeats scholars Richard J. Finneran and George Mills Harper. This first complete edition includes virtually all of the Nobel laureate's published work, in authoritative texts and with extensive explanatory notes.

Later Articles and Reviews consists of fifty-four prose pieces published between 1900 and Yeats's death in January 1939 and benefits from the notes and emendations of Yeats scholar Colton Johnson. The pieces collected here are occasional, and they reflect the many interests and engagements of Yeats in his maturity. No longer a reviewer or polemicist, Yeats is an international figure: a senator in the fledgling Irish state, a defining modern poet, a distinguished essayist. And here we have him writing -- with grace, wit, and passion -- on the state of Ireland in the world, on Irish language and Irish literature, on his artistic contemporaries, on the Abbey Theater, on divorce, on censorship, on his evolution as a poet and dramatist, on his own poetry.

Volume X also includes texts of ten radio programs Yeats broadcast between 1931 and 1937. This is not only the first collection but also the first printing of Yeats's radio work, which constitutes the largest previously uncollected body of his writings and possibly the most important to remain largely unstudied. Carefully assembled from manuscripts, typescripts, broadcast scripts, and fragmentary recordings, the programs range from a scripted interview on contemporary issues to elaborate stagings of his own and others' poetry. One of the radio programs is presented in an appendix complete with the commissioned musical score that set Yeats's poetry to music, Yeats's own emendations on the BBC broadcast script, and the diacritical notes with which the broadcast reader indicated Yeats's interpretive instructions.

Here, then, is seasoned Yeats, writing and speaking vigorously and with keen personal insight about the modern age and his place in it.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439150382
  • Publisher: Scribner
  • Publication date: 5/1/2010
  • Pages: 432
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

William Butler Yeats is generally considered to be Ireland’s greatest poet, living or dead, and one of the most important literary figures of the twentieth century. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923.

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Table of Contents

CONTENTS

Editor's Preface

Abbreviations

Later Articles and Reviews

1. Noble and Ignoble Loyalties

The United Irishman, 21 April 1900

2. Irish Fairy Beliefs

The Speaker, 14 July 1900

3. Irish Witch Doctors

The Fortnightly Review, September 1900

4. Irish Language and Irish Literature

The Leader, 1 September 1900

5. A Postscript to a Forthcoming Book of Essays by Various Writers

All Ireland Review, 1 December 1900

6. John Eglinton

The United Irishman, 9 November 1901

7. Literature and the Conscience

The United Irishman, 7 December 1901

8. Egyptian Plays

The Star, 23 January 1902

9. Away

The Fortnightly Review, April 1902

10. Mr Yeats's New Play

The United Irishman, 5 April 1902

11. An Ancient Conversation

All Ireland Review, 5, 12 April 1902

12. The Acting at St Teresa's Hall

The United Irishman, 12 April 1902

13. The Acting at St Teresa's Hall II

The United Irishman, 26 April 1902

14. The Freedom of the Theatre

The United Irishman, 1 November 1902

15. A Canonical Book

The Bookman, May 1903

16. The Irish National Theatre and Three Sorts of Ignorance

The United Irishman, 24 October 1903

17. Emmet the Apostle of Irish Liberty

The Gaelic American, 5 March 1904

18. America and the Arts

The Metropolitan Magazine, April 1905

19. British Association Visit to the Abbey Theatre

British Association Visit, Abbey Theatre, Special Programme, 4, 8 September 1908

20. The Art of the Theatre

The New Age, 16 June 1910

21. The Theatre of Beauty

Harper's Weekly, 11 November 1911

22. The Story of the Irish Players

Sunday Record-Herald, 4 February 1912

23. The Polignac Prize

Royal Society of Literature, The Academic Committee: Addresses of Reception, 1914

24. Thomas Davis

New Ireland, 17 July 1915

25. Sir Hugh Lane's Pictures

The Observer, January 21, 1917

26. Major Robert Gregory

The Observer, February 17, 1918

27. The Irish Dramatic Movement

The Voice of Ireland, 1923

28. Nobel Prize Acceptance

Les Prix Nobel en 1923, 1924

29. Miss Sara Allgood

The Irish Times, January 19, 1924

30. A Memory of Synge

The Irish Statesman, July 5, 1924

31. Compulsory Gaelic

The Irish Statesman, August 2, 1924

32. Royal Irish Society Awards at the Tailteann Festival

The Transatlantic Review, November 1924

33. An Undelivered Speech

The Irish Statesman, March 14, 1925

34. Divorce

The Irish Times, June 12, 1925

35. The Child and the State

The Irish Statesman, December 5, 12, 1925

36. The Need for Audacity of Thought

The Dial, February 1926

37. A Defence of the Abbey Theatre

The Dublin Magazine, April-June 1926

38. Memorial to the Late T. W. Lyster

[pamphlet for subscribers], June 1926

39. The Censorship and St Thomas Aquinas

The Irish Statesman, September 22, 1928

40. The Irish Censorship

The Spectator, September 29, 1928

41. Oedipus the King

BBC Broadcast, September 8, 1931

42. Reading of Poems

BBC Broadcast, September 8, 1931

43. Ireland, 1921-1931

The Spectator, January 30, 1932

44. Poems About Women

BBC Broadcast, April 10, 1932

45. Plain Man's Oedipus

The New York Times, January 15, 1933

46. The Great Blasket

The Spectator, June 2, 1933

47. The Growth of a Poet

The Listener, April 4, 1934

48. The Irish Literary Movement

Radio Éireann Broadcast, October 12, 1935

49. Abbey Theatre Broadcast

BBC Broadcast, February 1, 1937

50. In the Poet's Pub

BBC Broadcast, April 2, 1937

51. In the Poet's Parlour

BBC Broadcast, April 22, 1937

52. My Own Poetry

BBC Broadcast, July 3, 1937

53. My Own Poetry Again

BBC Broadcast, October 29, 1937

54. I Became an Author

The Listener, August 4, 1938

Appendixes

A. Copy-Texts Used for This Edition

B. Emendations to the Copy-Texts and Broadcast Texts

C. The Setting of 'My Own Poetry'

Notes

Index

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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2014

    ♟ Freya ♟

    I love it! I have read every chaper that you hae posted now and everyone of them is absoulutly amazing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2014

    Nebula&star

    Good!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2014

    Winterberry's Struggle ~ Chapter 20

    (Written in Hazelpaw's point of view ((remember, she's in ScorchClan now!)) And this takes place right after the battle.) <p> Pain screeched in every part of Hazelpaw. It seemed like her whole body was on fire. To add on top of it, Winterpaw and Dustpaw both got away... Alive. But the fact that both Ripplestar and Owlblizzard died eased the pain a little. <br> *WaterClan's probably in chaos! Overdue ceremonies, unorganized hunting and brder patrols, and no cat to control the Clan itself!* She thought with mischief, imagining her former Clan in so much struggle. Right after ScorchClan retreated the battle, Hazelpaw talked with Flamestar. She said that now would be a perfect time to go back and raid again, because WaterClan had nobody to take charge. <br> "I like how you think, Hazelpaw," Flamestar had purred in admiration, "but we can't. It would probably do more harm than good towards us. We need to recover from the battle. Some cats could barely stand on their legs from blood loss and injuries." That's what Hazelpaw hated most about ScorchClan; they had no medicine cat. She believed that a Clan must always stay at their peak conditions in case they want to ambush or in they are ambushed. She brushed her thoughts away; today was her warrior ceremony. Hazelpaw began to groom her hazel and white fur, making it shimmer in the sun. She licked and cleaned her wounds the best she could and hid them with fur, wanting to look her best as she is presented to her new Clan. Most members of ScorchClan still didn't trust her after Dustpaw, her brother, claimed he would be joining and then escaped with their prisoner. It didn't matter, as long as Flamestar thought she was loyal. <br> "Let all cats old enough to fight their own battle, join beneath the Large Boulder for a ceremony!" Flamestar's yowl rang across the clearing, acting like a magnet and gathering the clan. A few cats could only peek out their dens, too weak and injured to stand and walk. This was it. Her warrior ceremony. "We gather for a very important and special time in a young cat's life. Hazelpaw, do you promise to uphold the Warrior Code and protect ScorchClan, even at the cost of your life?" <br> "I do," she said boldly. <br> "Then by the power of StarClan, I now name you Hazelbreeze, official warrior of ScorchClan." Most of the Clan cheered for Hazelbreeze. <br> *The best part is,* she thought with pride, *is that I'm one step ahead of my brother, but most importantly, Winterpaw. She will pay.* <p> (Thanks for reading and commenting on another chapter! NEWS: I just wrote the prologue of an original series, Kleptos and Invies. It has a great storyline and plot that I think you'd like, so go check it out at 'diety'! Again, I'm locked out of 'erin hunter' result 1, where most people look for ads and go to advertise. So if you ever are making an adveritsement, could you possibly just throw in, "A new chapter is out in Winterberry's Struggle and Kleptos & Invies, at 'white berry' and 'wb' for Winterberry and 'diety' for K&I"? You don't have to, of course, but that would really help me out :D Thx! -Reflections&#9830

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2014

    Shadowwing

    Awesome as always. I hate Hazelpaw/breeze. I hope Winterpaw gets her good.

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