The Colorado Mountain Companion: A Potpourri of Useful Miscellany from the Highest Parts of the Highest State

The Colorado Mountain Companion: A Potpourri of Useful Miscellany from the Highest Parts of the Highest State

by John M. Fayhee
     
 

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You will learn mountain lexicons (so that you’ll know what a gutter bunny, potato chip, and prune really mean), Colorado as a movie set, Colorado songs, skiing, fishing, avalanches, geology, historic districts, hiking and biking, snakes, Superfund sites, strange festivals, weather miserability index and much more.See more details below

Overview

You will learn mountain lexicons (so that you’ll know what a gutter bunny, potato chip, and prune really mean), Colorado as a movie set, Colorado songs, skiing, fishing, avalanches, geology, historic districts, hiking and biking, snakes, Superfund sites, strange festivals, weather miserability index and much more.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780871089670
Publisher:
Graphic Arts Books
Publication date:
09/15/2012
Series:
Pruett Series
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
350
File size:
2 MB
Age Range:
12 Years

Read an Excerpt

Mountain License Plates

“Forever and ever, you could eyeball a Colorado automobile license plate and discern from whence that vehicle hailed. From 1959 to 1982, the Colorado Department of Revenue, which includes the Division of Motor Vehicles (which, in turn, supervises all matters related to license plates), issued what were known as the “2/4 plates.” These plates basically started with two county-specific letters, followed by a series of numbers that could be anywhere from one digit to four. There was some crossover in the latter years of the 2/4-plate program when plate numbering started running out. However, for the most part, that overlap was found in the more populated counties of the Front Range. In the early 1980s, the Department of Corrections, which oversees the actual manufacture of license plates in Colorado (yes, the prisoners-making-license-plates stereotype is accurate), came to the conclusion that, because of increases in the state’s population and the resultant increased number of registered vehicles, it would have to scrap the 2/4 system, a decision that caused a surprising amount of ire, especially in the more chauvinistic rural counties in Colorado. The change resulted in a non-county-specific system with license plates generally containing three letters, followed by three numbers. The new system sometimes seems like it is county specific. County clerks, who issue license plates on the local level, may order, say, 500 plates at a time. These plates will likely appear in sequence (e.g., WRF-000, WRF-001, etc.). But a county on the complete other side of the state might get the next 500 in the WRF sequence. The Division of Motor Vehicles did resurrect county-specific plates from 1989 to 1992, when it offered its “denim plates.” These plates were blue and actually had the name of the county in which the vehicle was registered written on the bottom. The plates proved far less popular than the green-on-white or white-on-green mountain background plates, and so the denim-plate program was scrapped. The state does allow for 2/4 plates issued before July 1, 2003, to remain legal. Thus, it is still possible to see license plates in the Colorado high country that read: ZB-14 or ZA-2. Whenever you see someone whose ride sports such plates, best not to get into an argument with that person about who has lived in the county the longest.”     From page 51-52, The Colorado Mountain Companion

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What People are saying about this

With his signature wit and inimitable style, Fayhee lays out a wealth of information about Colorado in this wonderfully readable pocket guide…an essential text for those who’d like to dig a little deeper into what it means to be a Coloradan—and what our state is all about.

                                      —Alex Miller, managing editor, Summit Daily News

Herein you’ll find everything you always wanted to know about Colorado, but were afraid to ask. …The Colorado Mountain Companion is an essential accompaniment to your own wayward and wonderful Colorado wanderings.

—Ken Wright, author, The Monkey Wrench Dad, Why I’m Against It All, and A Wilder Life

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