The Columbia History of American Television

The Columbia History of American Television

by Gary Edgerton
     
 

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Richly researched and engaging, The Columbia History of American Television tracks the growth of TV into a convergent technology, a global industry, a social catalyst, a viable art form, and a complex and dynamic reflection of the American mind and character.
Renowned media historian Gary R. Edgerton follows the technological progress and increasing cultural

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Overview

Richly researched and engaging, The Columbia History of American Television tracks the growth of TV into a convergent technology, a global industry, a social catalyst, a viable art form, and a complex and dynamic reflection of the American mind and character.
Renowned media historian Gary R. Edgerton follows the technological progress and increasing cultural relevance of television from its prehistory (before 1947) to the Network Era (1948-1975) and the Cable Era (1976-1994). He considers the remodeling of television's look and purpose during World War II; the gender, racial, and ethnic components of its early broadcasts and audiences; its transformation of postwar America; and its function in the political life of the country. In conclusion, Edgerton takes a discerning look at our current Digital Era and the new forms of instantaneous communication that continue to change America's social, political, and economic landscape.

Editorial Reviews

The Virginian-Pilot
A useful overview... [that] captures the technological, economic, and cultural sweep of an industry that influenced... what would become the Global Village.

— Bill Ruehlmann

CHOICE

An extensive, readable... informative, well-written study... Recommended.

Communication Booknotes Quarterly
A tour-de-force narrative of more than six decades of American television and its impact on U.S. society.... An important contribution.

— Christopher H. Sterling

American Reference Books Annual
An excellent addition to any undergraduate library and also a nice addition to public libraries.

— Linda W. Hacker

Film & History
A marvelous, detailed, and comprehensive narrative... This remarkable book, unquestionably one-of-a-kind, belongs in every reference library.

— Robert Fyne

Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media
Positioned with the monumental works of Erik Barnouw, Asa Briggs, Christopher Sterling and John Kittross, Edgerton contributes a comprehensive study of American television's popular culture.... The Columbia History of American Television should be on the shelf of every television historian and popular culture scholar, as well as the non-specialist.

— Donald G. Godfrey

The Midwest Book Review
A seminal work of meticulous scholarship... Welcome and highly recommended.

— James A. Cox

Journal of American Studies
Highly informative... eminently readable... Edgerton tells a compelling history of the medium. His book would work well as a primer for general readers, as well as for scholars (particularly international readers) wanting to gain an understanding of the history, forms, and economics of the U.S. television system as well as pointers for further research from his meticulous referencing.

— Faye Woods

American Journalism
[The book] is meticulous and inspired. Devoted to television, it is richly resourced, eloquently written, and nicely illustrated.

— Craig Allen

Journal of American History
This book is best seen as an update of Erik Barnouw's widely read and concise history, Tube of Plenty: The Evolution of American Television. Moving beyond Barnouw, Edgerton has attempted to craft a unified narrative that simultaneously engages some of the more fine-grained scholarship in the field.... A highly readable account of the development of a complex industry and cultural form.

— Michael Kackman

Media International Australia
A monumental and definitive account of American television.

— Jason Jacobs

Choice
An extensive, readable... informative, well-written study... Recommended.
The Virginian-Pilot - Bill Ruehlmann

A useful overview... [that] captures the technological, economic, and cultural sweep of an industry that influenced... what would become the Global Village.

Communication Booknotes Quarterly - Christopher H. Sterling

A tour-de-force narrative of more than six decades of American television and its impact on U.S. society.... An important contribution.

American Reference Books Annual - Linda W. Hacker

An excellent addition to any undergraduate library and also a nice addition to public libraries.

Film & History - Robert Fyne

A marvelous, detailed, and comprehensive narrative... This remarkable book, unquestionably one-of-a-kind, belongs in every reference library.

Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media - Donald G. Godfrey

Positioned with the monumental works of Erik Barnouw, Asa Briggs, Christopher Sterling and John Kittross, Edgerton contributes a comprehensive study of American television's popular culture.... The Columbia History of American Television should be on the shelf of every television historian and popular culture scholar, as well as the non-specialist.

The Midwest Book Review - James A. Cox

A seminal work of meticulous scholarship... Welcome and highly recommended.

Journal of American Studies - Faye Woods

Highly informative... eminently readable... Edgerton tells a compelling history of the medium. His book would work well as a primer for general readers, as well as for scholars (particularly international readers) wanting to gain an understanding of the history, forms, and economics of the U.S. television system as well as pointers for further research from his meticulous referencing.

American Journalism - Craig Allen

[The book] is meticulous and inspired. Devoted to television, it is richly resourced, eloquently written, and nicely illustrated.

Journal of American History - Michael Kackman

This book is best seen as an update of Erik Barnouw's widely read and concise history, Tube of Plenty: The Evolution of American Television. Moving beyond Barnouw, Edgerton has attempted to craft a unified narrative that simultaneously engages some of the more fine-grained scholarship in the field.... A highly readable account of the development of a complex industry and cultural form.

Media International Australia - Jason Jacobs

A monumental and definitive account of American television.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231512183
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
06/01/2010
Series:
Columbia Histories of Modern American Life
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
512
Sales rank:
1,167,289
File size:
18 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

What People are saying about this

Ron Simon

With a sweeping narrative and a close eye for detail, Gary Edgerton has written a compelling, scholarly history of America's favorite art form, which will surely set the standard in the years to come.

Ron Simon, curator, television and radio, The Paley Center for Media

Kathy Merlock Jackson

Concise, complete, readable, and up-to-date, following television from its inception to its role in a global media age and placing it in cultural context. Destined to become a classic in the field.

Kathy Merlock Jackson, editor of the Journal of American Culture

Ken Burns

Gary Edgerton's book has wisely told a story that focuses on single and representative events rather than trying to be encyclopedic. And he pulls it off. This is an accessible and compelling narrative of the complicated forces that went into creating our most enigmatic of mediums.

Ken Burns, filmmaker

Brian Rose

Gary Edgerton covers an astonishing amount of material, examining with great intelligence and insight the dynamic growth and development of television. His work is all the more noteworthy for the skill in which he covers politics, economics, sociology, technology, aesthetics, and cultural impact in a highly readable and deftly organized manner.

Brian Rose, professor of communication and media studies, Fordham University

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