The Coming Conflict with China

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Overview

From two former Beijing bureau chiefs with long experience in Asian affairs comes a clear-eyed and uncompromising look at the potentially disastrous collision course now taking shape in U.S.-China relations. Aggressively anti-American, China has nuclear weapons deliberately targeted at the United States. Recent confrontations between Chinese and American military forces indicate that China may try to take Taiwan by force. While our trade deficit rises to unprecedented heights, the powerful new china lobby shapes ...
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Overview

From two former Beijing bureau chiefs with long experience in Asian affairs comes a clear-eyed and uncompromising look at the potentially disastrous collision course now taking shape in U.S.-China relations. Aggressively anti-American, China has nuclear weapons deliberately targeted at the United States. Recent confrontations between Chinese and American military forces indicate that China may try to take Taiwan by force. While our trade deficit rises to unprecedented heights, the powerful new china lobby shapes U.S. policy with the support of American businesses eager for a share of its booming markets. The Coming Conflict with China is required reading for those who wish to understand the tense global rivalry that is already shaping the course of the 21st century.

"Plunges harpoons into the tenderest interstices of the Chinese-American relationship."--New York Times

"Disturbing and provocative...There is plenty to worry about."--Wall Street Journal

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The United States and China in the early 1990s became global rivals, an antagonism that will dominate the early decades of the 21st century, according to this farsighted, chilling report. The authors disclose internal Communist Party documents portraying the U.S. as China's archenemy and revealing Beijing's goal of becoming Asia's dominant power, partly by seizing control of the South China Sea, its islands and its oil-rich outcroppings almost as far south as Indonesia. They show that China's aggressive trade policy includes highly protectionist barriers, as well as the creation of numerous companies operating in the U.S.-indirect subsidiaries of the Chinese army, established for military technology transfer and backdoor access to financial markets. Blasting the Clinton administration for its inconsistent policy toward China, the authors unmask Beijing's intensive lobbying activities, which have led Washington to back down on almost every threat to take action against China for violations of international norms. Fueled by virulently aggrieved nationalism, the dictatorial People's Republic, which has sold nuclear weapons technology and missiles to Pakistan and Iran, is well on its way to becoming the world's second strongest military power, assert the authors, who put the size of China's military spending at 10 to 20 times official estimates. With a view to fostering a stable, more democratic China while protecting U.S. interests, they outline measures designed to reduce our trade deficit with China, to oppose human rights violations, to deluge the Chinese mainland with information. This hard-hitting critique sounds a wake-up call. Bernstein, New York Times book critic, formerly Time's Beijing bureau chief, wrote Dictatorship of Virtue, an analysis of multiculturalism. Munro, director of the Foreign Policy Research Institute's Asia Program in Philadelphia, was Beijing bureau chief for the Toronto Globe and Mail. (Feb.)
Library Journal
The alarming sound of this book's title rings the second coming of the Cold War. Bernstein and Munro, both seasoned journalists, predict an inevitable conflict with China, which has become the world's second most powerful nation since the Soviet Union's collapse. With detailed documentation and analysis of Chinese foreign and domestic policies as well as the Taiwan Strait Crisis in 1996, the authors argue that China is no longer a strategic friend of the United States but a formidable enemy. China's intention to play a more active role in Asian affairs is presented here as a threat to U.S. political and economic interests. The book raises important concerns about the direction of China's rapid development and America's lack of a clear and consistent policy toward Sino-American relations. Recommended for academic libraries.-Mark Meng, St. John's Univ. Lib., New York
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679776628
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 2/1/1998
  • Series: Vintage Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 5.16 (w) x 8.01 (h) x 0.57 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface to the Vintage Edition
Introduction 3
1 America is the Enemy 22
2 "We will Never Seek Hegemony" 51
3 Speak Loudly But Carry a Small Stick 82
4 The New China Lobby 105
5 Deficits, Technology, and Pla, Inc. 130
6 Flashpoint: Taiwan 149
7 China's Plan for Japan 166
8 China Versus America: A War Game 186
Conclusion: Coping with China 203
Notes 223
Acknowledgments 233
Index 235
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2001

    not real indepth

    Good as far as brevity is concerned, but a little too ideological. To be more realistic, China is not acting on evil ambitions, but hegemonic desires for superpower status and yes it is bending the rules. Just for your info, this approach is nothing new.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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