The Commercialization of American Culture: New Advertising, Control and Democracy / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$48.27
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 96%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (20) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $36.25   
  • Used (14) from $1.99   

Overview

Advertising in the United States has infiltrated virtually every aspect of life from classroom television through supermarket check-out lanes to doctors' surgeries. The advertising industry is constantly seeking new consumer avenues, the most recent including niche marketing, database marketing, cross-promotion and place-based marketing. In this valuable resource, Matthew P Mc Allister critically assesses the role of advertising in society, examines the recent innovations in technique, and discusses the social and commercial implications of these developments.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The media, which are essential to the well-being of a democracy, are doing a poor job in serving a participatory citizenship, and are likely to do an even worse job in the future, says McAllister (communication studies, Va. Polytechnic Inst. and State U.). A large reason, he argues, is the current direction of advertising--the fuel that powers the engine of media--in an era of one- newspaper towns, cable monopolies, and homogeneous mall theater chains. He explores advertising tactics such as place-based media, cross-promotion, and product placement in movies, and shows that these phenomena are related, sparked by the same trends and often designed to accomplish the same goals. Paper edition (unseen), $21.95. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803953802
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications
  • Publication date: 11/2/1995
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 312
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction
The Changing Nature of Advertising and Control
Advertising's External and Internal Control
Social Implications
Place-Based Advertising
Control through Location
Controlling Viewer Behavior
Creating the Zapless Ad
Cross Promotion
Control through Cooperation
Sponsorship
Control behind a Philanthropic Facade
Commercials, Control and the Computer Revolution
Conclusion

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)