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The Common Sense Of Drinking
     

The Common Sense Of Drinking

by Richard R. Peabody
 
Written by Richard Peabody in the early 1930s, "The Common Sense of Drinking" describes alcoholism and a method for its cure. The roots of Peabody's book came from Boston's Emmanuel Church where clergy and lay practitioners reported success in treating alcoholics. However, Peabody's book is a secular treatment of the problem using psychology. The book was a best

Overview

Written by Richard Peabody in the early 1930s, "The Common Sense of Drinking" describes alcoholism and a method for its cure. The roots of Peabody's book came from Boston's Emmanuel Church where clergy and lay practitioners reported success in treating alcoholics. However, Peabody's book is a secular treatment of the problem using psychology. The book was a best seller in the early 1930's and had a major influence on Alcoholics Anonymous founder Bill Wilson. The book's methods for the "cure" of alchoholism are as relevant today as they were in the 1930's. (All profits from this book are donated to programs for "at Risk" children.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781453886250
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
10/19/2010
Pages:
184
Sales rank:
935,347
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.42(d)

Meet the Author

Richard R. Peabody
1892--1936
Richard R. Peabody was afflicted with alcoholism in young adulthood, which was exacerbated by his wartime experiences. He had served as a Captain in the United States Army's 15th Field Artillery, 2nd Division, AEF, during World War I. His disease led to the disolution of his marriage. He became a disciple of the Emmanuel Movement, named for Boston's Emmanuel Church where clergy and lay practitioners reported success in treating alcoholics. He wrote "The Common Sense of Drinking," published by Little Brown in 1931, and reprinted in 1933, in which he was the first to state there was no cure for alcoholism. The book was a best seller and had a major influence on Alcoholics Anonymous founder Bill Wilson. Peabody continued to treat alcoholics though he was neither a medical professional nor a psychologist.

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