The Complete Book of Year-Round Small-Batch Preserving: Over 300 Delicious Recipes

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The Complete Book of Year-Round Small-Batch Preserving takes the mystery out of home preserving, letting you make the most of fresh fruits and vegetables as they become available throughout the year.

Ellie Topp and Margaret Howard guide you through the latest and safest methods for making delicious jams, jellies and marmalades with mouth-watering names like Peach Lavender Jam, Apple Cider Cinnamon Jelly and Mango Marmalade. Dream of that winter...

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Overview

The Complete Book of Year-Round Small-Batch Preserving takes the mystery out of home preserving, letting you make the most of fresh fruits and vegetables as they become available throughout the year.

Ellie Topp and Margaret Howard guide you through the latest and safest methods for making delicious jams, jellies and marmalades with mouth-watering names like Peach Lavender Jam, Apple Cider Cinnamon Jelly and Mango Marmalade. Dream of that winter holiday in the tropics while making Island Papaya Pineapple Conserve with Rum!

But there's much more than just sweet spreads here. There is also a dazzling array of fruit butters, unusual pickles, piquant sauces, sassy salsas, choice chutneys, flavored oils and specialty vinegars. All will impress your family and guests at a fraction of the price of the commercial ones.

And now with this cornucopia of preserves at hand, take off some lids to make delights such as Coffee Cake with Cranberry Conserve, Apricot Papaya Smoothie or Jalepeno Quesadillas.

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Editorial Reviews

Renee Enna
Takes the pressure off cooks who don't have the time ... but still want to savor the season's bounty. —Chicago Tribune
Greg Neiman
These are flavors for grownups ... Best of all, there are good instructions on technique.
Richmond Times-Dispatch
Perfect for using ingredients when they are at peak season and lowest price.
Valparaiso Vidette Times
This is the book suggested for anyone seeking to crack the mysteries of first-time preserving.
Valparaiso Vidette Times
This is the book suggested for anyone seeking to crack the mysteries of first-time preserving.
Chicago Tribune - Renée Enna
Takes the pressure off cooks who don't have the time ... but still want to savor the season's bounty.
Red Deer Advocate - Greg Neiman
These are flavors for grownups ... Best of all, there are good instructions on technique.
Richmond Times-Dispatch
Some recipes require as little as 10 minutes of processing time ... perfect for using ingredients when they are at peak season and lowest price.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552095751
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 2/5/2005
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 368
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Ellie Topp is a Professional Home Economist and a Certified Culinary Professional (CCP) by the International Association of Culinary Professionals. She holds a Bachelors degree in Home Economics from Northwestern University, a Masters degree in foods and nutrition from the University of Wisconsin and was a research associate in the Department of Food Research at the University of Illinois . Ellie writes a monthly column, 'Food Bits', for a local newspaper and has authored eight cookbooks. With support from Canola Information Service and in collaboration with Health Canada, Ellie developed a safe method for making flavored oils, the results of which were included in The Complete Book of Small-Batch Preserving (Firefly 2001, 2007) and published in Food Research International (Topp, E.B., F.J. Cook, G.C. Topp. "Heating oils with fresh vegetable inclusions: modelling and measurement of heating pattern."
Vol.36 [2003] 831-842).

Ellie is an active member of the Ontario and Ottawa Home Economics Associations, the International Association of Culinary Professionals and Cuisine Canada.

Margaret Howard is a Registered Dietitian and a Professional Home Economist. She holds a Bachelor Degree in Science, with a specialty in Home Economics from University of Western Ontario and interned in dietetics at Toronto General Hospital. Margaret has authored 15 cookbooks including several for people with diabetes published in cooperation with the Canadian Diabetes Association. Testing recipes and writing for consumers in magazines and cookbooks is an ongoing professional activity. As a former Consumer Services Manager for Thomas J. Lipton, Inc responsible for the Test Kitchen and Customer Relations, Margaret brings a background knowledge of consumers needs into her writing. As a media spokesperson, Margaret has given numerous TV,
radio and press interviews in both Canada and the U.S.

Margaret's professional associations include: Dietitians of Canada, Ontario Dietetic Association, Cuisine Canada, Ontario Home Economics Association and Home Economists in Business.

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Read an Excerpt

Sample recipe from Chapter 6: Pickle Perfection Multi-Colored Ginger Pickled Peppers

Allow these pickles to sit for several weeks for the full flavor to develop. Serve them with cold cuts or roasted meats and salads.

1 sweet green pepper, sliced lengthwise
1 sweet red pepper, sliced lengthwise
1 sweet yellow pepper, sliced lengthwise
2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and thinly sliced
1 2-inch (5 cm) piece gingerroot, peeled and thinly sliced
1 1/2 cups (375 mL) rice vinegar
1/2 cup (125 mL) water
2 tbsp (25 mL) granulated sugar
1 tsp (5 mL) pickling salt
  1. Place peppers and gingerroot in a shallow bowl. Combine vinegar, water, sugar and salt; stir well to dissolve. Pour over peppers. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
  2. Drain peppers, reserving liquid. Remove hot jars from canner. Pack peppers into jars.
  3. Bring drained liquid to a boil over high heat. Pour over peppers to within 1/2 inch (1 cm) of rim (head space). Process 15 minutes for half-pint (250 mL) jars and 20 minutes for pint (500 mL) jars as directed on page 133 (Longer Time Processing Procedure*).

    Makes 3 half-pint (250 mL) jars.


• In addition to an overview of the purpose, procedures and equipment needed for canning in the main Introduction, the book also includes detailed, illustrated and simple directions, complete with a convenient timing schedule, for processing as part of the Introduction to each of the two main sections: Sweet Spreads and Condiments of Choice.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 7
Sweet Spreads
Introduction 16
Chapter 1 Jams for All Seasons 23
Chapter 2 Jelly Made Easy 62
Chapter 3 Marvelous Marmalades 78
Chapter 4 Conserves, Butters and Curds 96
Chapter 5 Light 'n' Low Sugar Spreads 117
Condiments of Choice
Introduction 130
Chapter 6 Pickle Perfection 135
Chapter 7 Ravishing Relishes 166
Chapter 8 Salsa Sensations 185
Chapter 9 Choice Chutneys 210
Chapter 10 Savory Sauces 228
All Those Extras
Introduction 256
Chapter 11 Flavored Oils and Specialty Vinegars 257
Chapter 12 The Finishing Touch 276
Chapter 13 Let's Open the Lid and Use What's Inside 307
Index 346
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Preface

Excerpted from the Introduction

Multi-hued peppers, juicy peaches and nectarines, glowing red and purple grapes — all these delicious fruits beckon to us at the farmer's market or produce counter. We load our shopping baskets with this bounty from all over the world. And then what? We certainly enjoy eating the fresh produce. But deep within most of us lurks a desire to preserve these flavors for future enjoyment.

Many of us remember our grandmothers spending long hours in the summer preserving the produce from their large gardens. While few of us have a desire to return to the era of preserving large quantities of food for the cold months, we are developing a taste for new flavors and want to use them to enhance an otherwise simple meal. A flavorful bit of chutney, a rich salsa, a crisp pickle, a special sauce, or a flavored oil or vinegar adds interest to a meal while fitting a healthy lifestyle. Jams, conserves, marmalades and jellies can be spread on toast, English muffins or tea biscuits with no added butter necessary.

Throughout this book we offer recipes for smaller rather than larger finished amounts. A small yield gives more opportunity to make several different preserves. It also reduces the risk of scorching that is always a danger when cooking larger batches. And it makes large storage areas unnecessary. Most recipes can be made year round and, most important, at your convenience.

Preserving food is great fun and not at all difficult. When you decide to preserve food, there are two important things you must do. The first is to destroy all micro-organisms such as bacteria, molds and yeasts naturally present in food to prevent them from spoiling the preserved product. Having done this, the second thing is to make sure your preserving containers are sealed in such a way that other organisms cannot enter, otherwise they will cause your carefully prepared food to spoil.

Micro-organisms and enzymes naturally present in foods cause many changes to occur. Not all of these changes are bad. Many micro-organisms — bacteria, molds and yeasts — are intentionally used to create new forms of foods. For instance, bacteria added to milk produce creamy yogurt. Enzymes turn milk into curds, and molds introduced into the curds create wonderful cheeses. Winemakers know the result of yeasts growing in grape juice. However, not all organisms cause changes that are desirable. They can cause food to spoil.

Today's methods of preserving are much easier, thanks to innovations from jar manufacturers. The two-piece closures, are much more foolproof than were the glass-topped sealer jars used in bygone days. And modern jars come in a variety of convenient sizes that let us preserve small amounts quickly without overwhelming our storage areas. The small batches featured in our book let you make a small amount of a tasty preserve in very short order.

We now have access to a wide variety of fruits and vegetables — some of which were unknown to North America until recently. Many of these fruits and vegetables, such as mangoes, papayas, fresh figs and even strawberries and a variety of peppers are now available year round. Almost all of our recipes can be made throughout the year with this greater availability. However, a few foods are only available for short times of the year. Seville oranges are a good example. They are usually in stores only in January and February. Other fruits and vegetables, although available throughout the year, may be of better quality at certain times. We believe the quality of our own locally grown produce is superior since it arrives fresh in our kitchens without extended storage. At other times, good imported produce is available — just remember, you may be paying more. Preserve when the quality is finest and price is lowest.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Excerpted from the Introduction

Multi-hued peppers, juicy peaches and nectarines, glowing red and purple grapes — all these delicious fruits beckon to us at the farmer's market or produce counter. We load our shopping baskets with this bounty from all over the world. And then what? We certainly enjoy eating the fresh produce. But deep within most of us lurks a desire to preserve these flavors for future enjoyment.

Many of us remember our grandmothers spending long hours in the summer preserving the produce from their large gardens. While few of us have a desire to return to the era of preserving large quantities of food for the cold months, we are developing a taste for new flavors and want to use them to enhance an otherwise simple meal. A flavorful bit of chutney, a rich salsa, a crisp pickle, a special sauce, or a flavored oil or vinegar adds interest to a meal while fitting a healthy lifestyle. Jams, conserves, marmalades and jellies can be spread on toast, English muffins or tea biscuits with no added butter necessary.

Throughout this book we offer recipes for smaller rather than larger finished amounts. A small yield gives more opportunity to make several different preserves. It also reduces the risk of scorching that is always a danger when cooking larger batches. And it makes large storage areas unnecessary. Most recipes can be made year round and, most important, at your convenience.

Preserving food is great fun and not at all difficult. When you decide to preserve food, there are two important things you must do. The first is to destroy all micro-organisms such as bacteria, molds and yeasts naturally present in food to prevent them from spoiling the preserved product. Having done this, the second thing is to make sure your preserving containers are sealed in such a way that other organisms cannot enter, otherwise they will cause your carefully prepared food to spoil.

Micro-organisms and enzymes naturally present in foods cause many changes to occur. Not all of these changes are bad. Many micro-organisms — bacteria, molds and yeasts — are intentionally used to create new forms of foods. For instance, bacteria added to milk produce creamy yogurt. Enzymes turn milk into curds, and molds introduced into the curds create wonderful cheeses. Winemakers know the result of yeasts growing in grape juice. However, not all organisms cause changes that are desirable. They can cause food to spoil.

Today's methods of preserving are much easier, thanks to innovations from jar manufacturers. The two-piece closures, are much more foolproof than were the glass-topped sealer jars used in bygone days. And modern jars come in a variety of convenient sizes that let us preserve small amounts quickly without overwhelming our storage areas. The small batches featured in our book let you make a small amount of a tasty preserve in very short order.

We now have access to a wide variety of fruits and vegetables — some of which were unknown to North America until recently. Many of these fruits and vegetables, such as mangoes, papayas, fresh figs and even strawberries and a variety of peppers are now available year round. Almost all of our recipes can be made throughout the year with this greater availability. However, a few foods are only available for short times of the year. Seville oranges are a good example. They are usually in stores only in January and February. Other fruits and vegetables, although available throughout the year, may be of better quality at certain times. We believe the quality of our own locally grown produce is superior since it arrives fresh in our kitchens without extended storage. At other times, good imported produce is available — just remember, you may be paying more. Preserve when the quality is finest and price is lowest.

 

Sample recipe from Chapter 6: Pickle Perfection

Multi-Colored Ginger Pickled Peppers

Allow these pickles to sit for several weeks for the full flavor to develop. Serve them with cold cuts or roasted meats and salads.

1 sweet green pepper, sliced lengthwise
1 sweet red pepper, sliced lengthwise
1 sweet yellow pepper, sliced lengthwise
2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and thinly sliced
1 2-inch (5 cm) piece gingerroot, peeled and thinly sliced
1 1/2 cups (375 mL) rice vinegar
1/2 cup (125 mL) water
2 tbsp (25 mL) granulated sugar
1 tsp (5 mL) pickling salt
  1. Place peppers and gingerroot in a shallow bowl. Combine vinegar, water, sugar and salt; stir well to dissolve. Pour over peppers. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
     
  2. Drain peppers, reserving liquid. Remove hot jars from canner. Pack peppers into jars.
     
  3. Bring drained liquid to a boil over high heat. Pour over peppers to within 1/2 inch (1 cm) of rim (head space). Process 15 minutes for half-pint (250 mL) jars and 20 minutes for pint (500 mL) jars as directed on page 133 (Longer Time Processing Procedure*).
     
    Makes 3 half-pint (250 mL) jars.
* In addition to an overview of the purpose, procedures and equipment needed for canning in the main Introduction, the book also includes detailed, illustrated and simple directions, complete with a convenient timing schedule, for processing as part of the Introduction to each of the two main sections: Sweet Spreads and Condiments of Choice.
Read More Show Less

Recipe

Sample recipe from Chapter 6: Pickle Perfection

Multi-Colored Ginger Pickled Peppers

Allow these pickles to sit for several weeks for the full flavor to develop. Serve them with cold cuts or roasted meats and salads.

1 sweet green pepper, sliced lengthwise
1 sweet red pepper, sliced lengthwise
1 sweet yellow pepper, sliced lengthwise
2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and thinly sliced
1 2-inch (5 cm) piece gingerroot, peeled and thinly sliced
1 1/2 cups (375 mL) rice vinegar
1/2 cup (125 mL) water
2 tbsp (25 mL) granulated sugar
1 tsp (5 mL) pickling salt
  1. Place peppers and gingerroot in a shallow bowl. Combine vinegar, water, sugar and salt; stir well to dissolve. Pour over peppers. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

  2. Drain peppers, reserving liquid. Remove hot jars from canner. Pack peppers into jars.

  3. Bring drained liquid to a boil over high heat. Pour over peppers to within 1/2 inch (1 cm) of rim (head space). Process 15 minutes for half-pint (250 mL) jars and 20 minutes for pint (500 mL) jars as directed on page 133 (Longer Time Processing Procedure*).

    Makes 3 half-pint (250 mL) jars.
* In addition to an overview of the purpose, procedures and equipment needed for canning in the main Introduction, the book also includes detailed, illustrated and simple directions, complete with a convenient timing schedule, for processing as part of the Introduction to each of the two main sections: Sweet Spreads and Condiments of Choice.
Read More Show Less

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