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The Complete Sol Worth
     

The Complete Sol Worth

by Larry Gross
 
One of the central figures in the development of the study of visual communication, Sol Worth (1922-1977) was a filmmaker and painter before he turned to academic pursuits. He began with the question of how film could be understood and studied as medium of communication, and from there, he moved on to larger and more profound questions about the nature of visual media

Overview

One of the central figures in the development of the study of visual communication, Sol Worth (1922-1977) was a filmmaker and painter before he turned to academic pursuits. He began with the question of how film could be understood and studied as medium of communication, and from there, he moved on to larger and more profound questions about the nature of visual media in general and the role that visual images play in shaping and constructing reality. He is perhaps best known for the “Navajo Film Project” that he conducted with anthropologist John Adair in which they gave 16mm cameras to Navajo residents of the Pine Springs, Arizona reservation in order to explore how people who had never made or used movies would do so for the first time. How would their movies reflect their own culture and their ways of seeing and telling about their experiences? The book, Through Navajo Eyes, included here, became enormously influential in the fields of anthropology, communication and cinema studies, among others.

In The Complete Sol Worth, editors Larry Gross and Jay Ruby collect all of Sol Worth's published writings, as well as some unpublished writings, extensive photo essays, and articles about Worth’s work.

Sol Worth’s work remains relevant and influential in visual communication and anthropology, and the e-book format enables an accessible collection of the entirety of his contributions. Readers can also access Teaterri, a video documentary that Worth produced which is part of a permanent collection at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

We hope this collection will introduce new readers to Sol Worth’s contribution to bettering our understanding of visual communication, culture, and life.

One of the central figures in the development of the study of visual communication, Sol Worth (1922-1977) was a filmmaker and painter before he turned to academic pursuits. He began with the question of how film could be understood and studied as medium of communication, and from there, he moved on to larger and more profound questions about the nature of visual media in general and the role that visual images play in shaping and constructing reality. He is perhaps best known for the “Navajo Film Project” that he conducted with anthropologist John Adair in which they gave 16mm cameras to Navajo residents of the Pine Springs, Arizona reservation in order to explore how people who had never made or used movies would do so for the first time. How would their movies reflect their own culture and their ways of seeing and telling about their experiences? The book, Through Navajo Eyes, included here, became enormously influential in the fields of anthropology, communication and cinema studies, among others.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781625171887
Publisher:
USC Annenberg Press
Publication date:
12/13/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
1012
File size:
27 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Larry Gross serves as Vice Dean at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Gross spent 35 years at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School where he was the Sol Worth Professor of Communication and deputy dean before joining USC in 2003 as director of the School of Communication. Gross holds degrees in psychology from Brandeis University and Columbia University. From 1971 to 1991, Gross co-directed the Cultural Indicators Project with George Gerbner which focused on television content and its influence on viewer attitudes and behavior, introducing the theory of cultivation. He has written and edited books covering a wide variety of issues in visual and cultural communication, as well as GLBT media studies. Gross was named a Guggenheim Fellow in 1998 and received the International Communication Association's Aubrey Fisher Mentorship Award in 2001. He was President of the International Communication Association in 2011-2012. He is the editor of the International Journal of Communication.

Jay Ruby, an emeritus professor of Anthropology at Temple University in Philadelphia, has been exploring the relationship between cultures and pictures for the past 40 years and is considered a leader in the field of visual anthropology and multimedia ethnography. His research interests revolve around the application of anthropological insights to the production and comprehension of photographs, film and TV. He holds degrees from the University of California, Los Angeles. A founding member of the Society for the Anthropology of Visual Communication, past president of International Film Seminars, Ruby holds advisory and board memberships in a number of national and international organizations. Since 1960, he has edited a variety of journals on American archaeology, popular culture, and visual anthropology. For the past three decades, he has conducted ethnographic studies of pictorial communication in Juniata County, PA, Oak Park, IL, and Bohemian Malibu.

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