THE COMPLETE WORKS OF PLATO (Special Nook Edition) FULL COLOR ILLUSTRATED VERSION: All the Works of Plato in a Single Volume!) The Apology The Republic The Laws and Other Classics of Greek Philosophy (Socrates) NOOKbook (COMPLETE WORKS COLLECTION)

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF PLATO (Special Nook Edition) FULL COLOR ILLUSTRATED VERSION: All the Works of Plato in a Single Volume!) The Apology The Republic The Laws and Other Classics of Greek Philosophy (Socrates) NOOKbook (COMPLETE WORKS COLLECTION)

4.5 30
by Plato
     
 
THE COMPLETE WORKS OF PLATO (Special Nook Edition)

FULL COLOR ILLUSTRATED VERSION: All the Works of Plato in a Single Volume!

The Apology The Republic The Laws and Other Classics of Greek Philosophy
(Socrates)
NOOKbook (COMPLETE WORKS COLLECTION)


PARTIAL TABLE OF CONTENTS

• BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
• THE

Overview

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF PLATO (Special Nook Edition)

FULL COLOR ILLUSTRATED VERSION: All the Works of Plato in a Single Volume!

The Apology The Republic The Laws and Other Classics of Greek Philosophy
(Socrates)
NOOKbook (COMPLETE WORKS COLLECTION)


PARTIAL TABLE OF CONTENTS

• BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
• THE APOLOGY
• INTRODUCTION.
• APOLOGY
• CRITO
• INTRODUCTION.
• CRITO
• CHARMIDES OR TEMPERANCE
• LACHES, OR COURAGE
• LYSIS; OR FRIENDSHIP
• EUTHYPHRO
• MENEXENUS
• LESSER HIPPIAS
• ION
• GORGIAS
• PROTAGORAS
• MENO
• EUTHYDEMUS
• CRATYLUS
• PHAEDO
• PHAEDRUS
• SYMPOSIUM
• THE REPUBLIC
• THEAETETUS
• PARMENIDES
• SOPHIST
• STATESMAN
• PHILEBUS
• TIMAEUS
• CRITIAS
• LAWS
• THE FIRST ALCIBIADES
• THE SECOND ALCIBIADES
• EPINOMIS
• ERYXIAS
• THE SEVENTH LETTER


WHY BUY BOOKS FROM THE COMPLETE WORKS COLLECTION FOR NOOK EDITION?

1. All COMPLETE WORKS COLLECTION Nook Books are priced as low as possible in order to offer unbelievable value and hours of reading pleasure for NOOKBook readers. All COMPLETE WORKS COLLECTION Nook Books bring together ALL the complete works of a classic literary author, character or series in a single, extremely low priced volume in a single download, thereby freeing up valuable space and visual clutter on your Barnes & Noble NOOK device.

2. All COMPLETE WORKS COLLECTION NOOKBooks are painstakingly formatted especially for the Barnes & Noble NOOK device and come with a FULLY INTERACTIVE table of contents and NOOK MasterLink(tm) technology.

3. All COMPLETE WORKS COLLECTION NOOKBooks come with additional material including photo(s) of the author, and/or critical commentary, and/or biographical or historical background.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012889409
Publisher:
The Complete Works Collection
Publication date:
05/30/2011
Series:
The Complete Works Collection , #15
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
107,584
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF PLATO (Special Nook Edition) FULL COLOR ILLUSTRATED VERSION 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Plato is the famous philosopher of all the philosophies.. all his works gains knowledge that can help to manipulate our life in a right way..
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent collection of all works of Plato a great philosopher of all times..
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
wow... i find already all the works of Plato in this book.. his biography and his works that will help to my study..
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
this collection of works of the famous philosopher is best book that can gain knowledge of our children and also in the future generation..
FugereTextus More than 1 year ago
Plato is studied using a standardised paragraph numbering system. This allows students and scholars to quickly locate passages regardless of the text edition or translation. Without the standard paragraph numbering, a translation is useless as a study tool. This collection doesn't have it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This volume of the complete works of Plato uses the translations done by Benjamin Jowett. The Jowett translations into English are used as the reading material for the classes about Plato's writings in most American universities. The university courses usually assign a hardbound edition. This epub edition is much more convenient than the very heavy hardbound format. I'd much rather carry my nook with all my other related course materials loaded along with this textbook.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great format for Nook Simple Touch
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book
Scott Duncan More than 1 year ago
Although I have not read the whole book,what I have read is very good and what I was looking for.Enjoy reading history,mythology and about ancient civilizations.Very good .
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Leave my daughter alone or I will snap your neck," she says innocently.
Manirul More than 1 year ago
Nice,,,, Great...!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He pads in warily.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cool. Ok i saw last post. Walks out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Can you help me develop some sort system to advertise for active cats here? Please. Shadowheart.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Of greatest importance to this review is the content generated by Benjamin Jarrett, i.e. his translations of and introductions to Plato's works, since Plato's works are long established in their texts and in their significance to Western Civilization. I cannot speak to Jarrett's introductions, because I did not read them. I get bogged down in introductions, in general, and lose interest before I can read the primary text, which I wanted to read in the first place. As for these introductions, the most important information is that which sets the stage in Athenian culture for a given dialogue. For my purposes, what I don't know about Athenian life during Plato's time can be discovered by the Nook's "Lookup" feature. Jarrett's interpretations are less interesting to me; I would rather simply read Plato's text and draw my own conclusions. As to Jarrett's translation, I have read the Apology in Greek and find that his translation has much of the feel and character of Plato's writing. In fact, if I have a complaint about Jarrett, it is that he sometimes tries too hard to force Greek grammar on an English language in which it does not fit, e.g. infinitives as the main verbs in subordinate clauses. Very occasionally he will also use a dated English word, i.e. "tiring" (short for attiring) rather than "fashion" or "couture" which would more contemporarily translate the same Greek word(s). As to Plato's text, he provides the bulk of our contemporary information about Socrates. Some say that he presents an idealized image of Socrates, but I find his characterization very human. If he does present an idealized image, I assert it is in the Apology and Crito (a dialogue between Socrates and his good friend Crito while the former is in prison awaiting execution) in which Socrates is presented as remarkably at peace with his approaching death. This is consistent with his philosophy, as set forth in the Gorgias and elsewhere, but is much harder to live out than to believe. That said, Plato's characterization largely harmonizes with Xenophon's description of Socrates' Apology, the other contemporaneous source for Socrates. I assert that Plato's Socrates, far from being an idealistic "Sun God" (as some describe him), is guilty of frequent logical fallacies, chiefly creating false dilemmas. These arise from a tendency to universalize inappropriately from specific cases. He also occasionally falls victim to equivocation regarding key concepts in his dialogues. A prime example arises in an extensive discussion in Gorgias with Polus regarding whether a person who does bad things and gets away with it is happier than a person unjustly punished. Polus even alludes to the equivocation, but neither pursues the issue. It seems to me that Socrates defines happiness as a sense of ethical well being which derives from an objective or de ontological standard. Polus, on the other hand, defines happiness as a subjective, emotional sense of contentment or positive feeling. As a result, they spend significant time talking past each other. Whatever faults I may find with Plato's Socrates, he is undeniably a source of wisdom and, through his inquiries, he began a process of trying to determine what comprises the well-lived life. While Plato's Socrates often seems unable to resolve with his dialogue partners what is and what is not "the good", he helps us frame a discussion which can get us closer to deciding how these elements ought to fit into our lives.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There isn't any problems I've found so far. I am enjoying this quite a bit.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As good as the book i read in college several years ago. No numeing system but who cares when all of plato's works are in your hand for 3 dollars. Just cite the page number and add a note in your nook if you are using it for your studies.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago