The Concept of Anxiety: A Simple Psychologically Oriented Deliberation in View of the Dogmatic Problem of Hereditary Sin

( 1 )

Overview

The first new translation of Kierkegaard's masterwork in a generation brings to vivid life this essential work of modern philosophy.Brilliantly synthesizing human insights with Christian dogma, Soren Kierkegaard presented, in 1844, The Concept of Anxiety as a landmark "psychological deliberation," suggesting that our only hope in overcoming anxiety was not through "powder and pills" but by embracing it with open arms. While Kierkegaard's Danish prose is surprisingly rich, previous translations—the most recent in ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$17.75
BN.com price
(Save 36%)$27.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (17) from $10.19   
  • New (10) from $10.19   
  • Used (7) from $10.60   
The Concept of Anxiety: A Simple Psychologically Oriented Deliberation in View of the Dogmatic Problem of Hereditary Sin

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$14.49
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$26.23 List Price

Overview

The first new translation of Kierkegaard's masterwork in a generation brings to vivid life this essential work of modern philosophy.Brilliantly synthesizing human insights with Christian dogma, Soren Kierkegaard presented, in 1844, The Concept of Anxiety as a landmark "psychological deliberation," suggesting that our only hope in overcoming anxiety was not through "powder and pills" but by embracing it with open arms. While Kierkegaard's Danish prose is surprisingly rich, previous translations—the most recent in 1980—have marginalized the work with alternately florid or slavishly wooden language. With a vibrancy never seen before in English, Alastair Hannay, the world's foremost Kierkegaard scholar, has finally re-created its natural rhythm, eager that this overlooked classic will be revivified as the seminal work of existentialism and moral psychology that it is.From The Concept of Anxiety:
"And no Grand Inquisitor has such frightful torments in readiness as has anxiety, and no secret agent knows as cunningly how to attack the suspect in his weakest moment, or to make so seductive the trap in which he will be snared; and no discerning judge understands how to examine, yes, exanimate the accused as does anxiety, which never lets him go, not in diversion, not in noise, not at work, not by day, not by night."

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
12/23/2013
Originally published in 1844, at the same time as Philosophical Fragments, this treatise by Kierkegaard (1813–1855), newly translated by Kierkegaard scholar Hannay, explores anxiety as a necessary part of the human condition, which when embraced can lead to "freedom's actuality as the possibility of possibility." Anxiety results from humanity's unique ability to reflect on itself, and the nature of its own existence. Each living person is both an individual as well as a species, capable of reproducing others of its kind. This self-awareness, which each person discovers at a certain point, Kierkegaard claims, is the true "original sin," and can lead to fear, guilt, and many other disorders, stemming from the "overwhelming knowledge of good and evil." Psychology, or what Kierkegaard calls "a science of subjective spirit," helps to bring this self-reflection to the surface, where it can be understood and accepted. Using a "sound knowledge of human life and sympathy for its interests," psychology is the best tool for countering anxiety. Referencing writers and thinkers as various as Hegel, Schelling, and Plato, and containing numerous footnotes, some several pages long, this dense book will likely appeal to a scholarly audience. (Mar.)
Kirkus Reviews
2013-12-15
Noted Kierkegaard scholar, translator and biographer Hannay (Emeritus, Philosophy/Univ. of Oslo; Kierkegaard: A Biography, 2001) offers a new translation of a little-known but significant work (1944) about the relationship between sin and anxiety. Although Kierkegaard (1813–1855) claims in the preface that he plans to "write the book straight off as the bird sings its say," many readers will find his words as similar to a bird's song as a bird's song is to a complex symphony. After some introductory remarks about thought, sin (which is not, he says, a sickness or an abnormality--far from it) and psychology, the philosopher begins with a disquisition on sin--specifically on original or "hereditary" sin. He notes that each individual's first sin is analogous to Adam's and declares, "Innocence is ignorance." He then moves to anxiety, a feeling absent in Eden, he writes, until Adam faced something he couldn't understand: the prohibition. Kierkegaard distinguishes between objective and subjective anxiety and notes the relationship to freedom: "Freedom's possibility announces itself in anxiety." He also makes a few clueless comments about the differences between men and women--comments that show that for all his erudition, he had a few things to learn. He describes each instant as "an atom of eternity," then moves on to discussions of fate, guilt and evil, equating the demonic with "unfreedom." He also explores the ways that we can lose freedom (a body's betrayal, a spiritual loss) and ends with some pages about faith. The book has moments of clarity and flow but also sections of great density (one footnote is more than two pages long); the author cites the Bible extensively and often uses phrases from foreign languages, all of which the editor translates in brackets. A text that will appeal to philosophers and Kierkegaard-ians but will leave readers with more general interests feeling…anxious.
Gordon Marino - New York Times
“[A] book at once so profound and byzantine that it seems to aim at evoking the very feeling it dissects. Perhaps more than any other philosopher, Kierkegaard reflected on the question of how to communicate the truths that we live by.”
Library Journal
02/01/2014
A fresh translation of Kierkegaard's 1844 treatise is long overdue, and Hannay (emeritus, philosophy, Univ. of Oslo) is the best philosopher for the job, having provided well-received translations from the Kierkegaard corpus, including Either/Or and Fear and Trembling. Those familiar with the Walter Lowrie translation of this work will find Hannay's effort familiar but will notice that it provides a keener edge to Kierkegaard's wit and a voice that is more the 19th-century Dane than Lowrie's, which was more 20th-century American. Kierkegaard took anxiety to be an unspecified fear or dread that is a precondition for freedom (and for that matter sin) as anxiety is the recognition of our current state and of the nature of possibility. Here, the philosopher (1813–55) self-consciously argues as a Christian, and while a number of his examples are dated, his arguments are nonetheless engaging. Almost as valuable as the translation is Hannay's introduction in which he provides the background necessary to grapple with Kierkegaard and a heartfelt argument for the value of studying this fountainhead of existentialism in general and Anxiety in particular. VERDICT Well worth the time for anyone interested in Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, or later existential philosophers.—James Wetherbee, Wingate Univ. Libs., NC
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780871407191
  • Publisher: Liveright Publishing Corporation
  • Publication date: 3/3/2014
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 251,200
  • Product dimensions: 8.20 (w) x 5.80 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Søren Kierkegaard (1813–1855), the author of more than twenty books, was a Danish philosopher and theologian whose work has been widely recognized as the foundations of both modern psychology and existentialism.

Alastair Hannay is an emeritus professor of philosophy at the University of Oslo. Besides several works on Kierkegaard, including a biography, he has previously translated six volumes of Kierkegaard's writings.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 31, 2014

    Why simplicity is so hard to reach remains a paradox of life for

    Why simplicity is so hard to reach remains a paradox of life for me. This is a difficult read at best to reach some of the simple notions Kierkegaard presents regarding anxiety, or what became known in the 20th century as existential angst. This particular work demonstrates the deep intertwining of religion (in the sense of ones deepest beliefs rather than institutional practice), philosophy-theology (in the sense of how world views are constructed), and psychology (in a refreshingly non-behavioral analysis of the basic human experience of existing). But it is work to grasp the ideas presented. Then, from my amateur perspective, the translation is also hard. For example, an idea of approximation is conveyed using the phrase "more or less". This term is then used with the indefinite article "a" so we read some other idea as "... a 'more or less' ". Granted, that is probably a more literal translation (I don't know Danish in the least) and Kierkegaard often refers to "...a more" and "a less". It is hard to tell whether it is just difficult reading Kierkegaard or this could have been better translated. Another place, page 90 under subsection 'B. The Outcome of a Historical Relation', Kierkegaard uses the Latin phrase "de te fabula narratur" which is followed by the translation [the story is told about you]. The context of the thought would be much better read as [the story told about you] where the word "told" is used as a simple verb. Having "you" as the subject instead of the "story" makes for an extra difficult struggle in understanding an already difficult topic. There seem to be many of these. I will have to read another translation to see if there is a difference in how readable this is. I will certainly not be learning Danish.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)