The Confederacy's Last Hurrah: Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville

( 3 )

Overview

Following the fall of Atlanta, rebel commander John Bell Hood rallied his demoralized troops and marched them off the Tennessee, desperately hoping to draw Sherman after him and forestall the Confederacy's defeat. But Sherman refused to be lured and began his infamous "March to the Sea," while Hood charged headlong into catastrophe.

In this compelling dramatic account of a final and fatal invasion by the Confederate Army of Tennessee, Wile Sword illuminates the missed ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$15.48
BN.com price
(Save 22%)$19.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (26) from $4.24   
  • New (5) from $12.69   
  • Used (21) from $4.24   
Sending request ...

Overview

Following the fall of Atlanta, rebel commander John Bell Hood rallied his demoralized troops and marched them off the Tennessee, desperately hoping to draw Sherman after him and forestall the Confederacy's defeat. But Sherman refused to be lured and began his infamous "March to the Sea," while Hood charged headlong into catastrophe.

In this compelling dramatic account of a final and fatal invasion by the Confederate Army of Tennessee, Wile Sword illuminates the missed opportunities, senseless bloody assaults, poor command decisions, and stubborn pride that resulted in 23,500 Confederate losses—including 7,00 casualties in one battle—and the pulverization of the South's second largest army.

Sword follows Hood and his army as they let an early advantage and possible victory slip away at Spring Hill, then engage in a reckless and ill-fated frontal attack on Franklin, often called the "Gettysburg of the West." Despite that disaster, Hood refuses to yield and presses on the Nashville and a two-day bloodbath that unhinges what is left of his battered troops—the worst defeat suffered by any army during the war.

Telling the story from both the Confederate and the Union perspectives, Sword pursues personalities as well as battles and troop strategy. He portrays Hood as a gutsy yet irresponsible leader—"a fool with a license to kill his own men"—whose valiant but rapidly dwindling troops were no match for the methodical General George G. Thomas and his better prepared—and entrenched—Union army. Hood, however, was not entirely to blame for Confederate failures, says Sword, who shows how decision making and actions—both good and bad, logical and chaotic—by key players on both sides helped determine the battles' outcomes.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Reprint of the HarperCollins edition published in 1992 under the title Embrace an Angry Wind, and winner of the Fletcher Pratt Award. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780700606504
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas
  • Publication date: 10/28/1993
  • Series: Modern War Studies Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 528
  • Sales rank: 305,088
  • Product dimensions: 6.29 (w) x 9.39 (h) x 1.05 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Preface

1. A Sharp Wind is Blowing

2. A Cupid on Crutches

3. Dark Moon Rising

4. The President's Watchdog

5. Too Much Lion, Not Enough Fox

6. Affairs of the Heart

7. Courage versus Common Sense

8. Words of Wisdom

9. Who Will Dance to Hood's Music?

10. Old Slow Trot

11. In the Best Spirits and Full of Hope

12. Playing Both Ends Against the Middle

13. The Spring Hill Races

14. Listening for the Sound of Guns

15. A Hand Stronger than Armies

16. Do You Think the Lord Will Be with Us Today?

17. One Whose Temper is Less Fortunately Governed

18. Tell Them to Fight—Fight like Hell!

19. The Pandemonium of Hell Turned Loose

20. Glorified Suicide at the Cotton Gin

21. Where Is the Glory?

22. There is No Hell Left in Them—Don't You Hear Them Praying?

23. The Thunder Drum of War

24. Forcing the Enemy To Take the Initiative

25. Gabriel Will Be Blowing His Last Horn

26. The Sunny South Has Caught a Terrible Cold

27. Let There Be No Further Delay

28. Matters of Some Embarrassment

29. Now, Boys, Is Our Time!

30. I Shall Go No Farther

31. Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory

32. Where the Grapes of Wrath Are Stored

33. Crying Like His Heart Would Break

34. A Retreat from the Lion's Mouth

35. The Cards Were Damn Badly Shuffled

36. The Darkest of All Decembers

37. Epilogue: The Twilight's Last Gleaming

Order of Battle, Confederate Army of Tennessee

Order of Battle, Federal Army

Reference Notes

Bibliography

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 30, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    Definitive Account of a Disastrous Campaign

    Wiley Sword has written what is most likely the best account of John Bell Hood's horrible Nashville Campaign. Hood took charge of the Confederate Army of the Tennessee after making false accusations against General Joe Johnston, only to loose Atlanta after several costly assaults on the Union lines. Because of this, he embarked on a campaign to retake Nashville. After loosing one of the best opportunities of the war at Spring Hill and wasting thousands of lives at Franklin, his army disintegrated in front of him at Nashville, ending his career and the effectiveness of one of the Confederacy's last armies. Sword wrote a gripping narrative that was very hard to put down, especially during the battle scenes. He intertwined the lives of common soldiers and generals alike through many first-person accounts on both sides. His analyses of the battles were clear and concise, and made it easy to understand why everything seemed to go wrong for John B. Hood. I would most certainly recommend this book to anyone wanting to learn about the Nashville campaign.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2005

    Masterpiece of a book.

    Author Wiley Sword is at the top of his game in this one, The book 'Confederacy's Last Hurrah' tells what, when where, and why in a very telling down to earth form. I read a lot of Civil War books and found myself smiling to myself in the very first few pages. The author combines the full emotions of both sides for the reader. Flat out when you finish this book you will understand how this campain went. One point I would like to make is that there should have been a few more maps in the book, this is always very useful. If you enjoy reading about the American Civil War this book is a must.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2001

    Objectivity AWOL

    Objective analysis is Absent Without Leave in this otherwise well written and researched book about the 1864 Tennessee Campaign of CSA General John Bell Hood. Sword places a critical spin on all decisions made by Hood, and omits any information supportive or complimentary of Hood, either by his superiors, or the soldiers that he commanded. Hood's own post-war explanations and recollections of the Campaign are brushed off by Sword as exagerations or lies. If Sword would have been thorough and balanced, and would have limited the book to the factual descriptions of the battles and it's participants, the book would have been much better. However, he mesmerizes unwitting readers with his gifted style, while censoring one of the primary historical characters of the book. If you are looking for a poignant record of the carnage of the Battle of Franklin, and the disintegration of the Army of Tennessee at the Battle of Nashville, this book is excellent. If you are wanting to understand why and how the campaign occurred, and the strategic and political reasoning behind the decision making of the commanders, this book falls flat.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)