×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Conquest of the Illinois
     

The Conquest of the Illinois

5.0 1
by George Rogers Clark
 

See All Formats & Editions

Written only a decade after George Rogers Clark’s conquest of Illinois, this firsthand account shows the region as it existed in the 1770s, explains how British occupation affected Kentucky settlers, and exhibits Clark’s enormous diplomatic skills in convincing the French settlers and Indians along the rivers of Illinois that they were better off under

Overview

Written only a decade after George Rogers Clark’s conquest of Illinois, this firsthand account shows the region as it existed in the 1770s, explains how British occupation affected Kentucky settlers, and exhibits Clark’s enormous diplomatic skills in convincing the French settlers and Indians along the rivers of Illinois that they were better off under the jurisdiction of the Americans rather than the British. In his new foreword to this book, Rand Burnette refers to Clark as a psychologist and an expert in human relations.

            

Believing the British responsible for Indian raids on the people of Kentucky, Clark determined to capture that area, which was claimed by his home state of Virginia. “His plan, which he presented to Governor Patrick Henry,” Burnette notes, “was to take possession of the Illinois country by defeating the British at Kaskaskia, win the support of the French in that area, and thus control both the Mississippi and the Ohio Rivers. The British support of the Indians, who raided the Kentucky settlements from the Illinois country, would be at an end.”

            

Clark’s stirring narrative—written between 1789 and 1791 and covering 1773–1779—chronicles the events in the Old Northwest in the second half of the eighteenth century. Life on the frontier was dangerous and uncertain at this time. As Clark points out and Milo Milton Quaife underlines in his footnotes, death came to many at the hands of Indians or in military battles and skirmishes.

            

First published in 1920 and long out of print, the Quaife edition of Clark’s The Conquest of The Illinois reprinted here is for the modern reader superior to the original. First, Quaife provided an index. Equally important for modern readers, he standardized Clark’s spelling. (Clark had little formal education, and his spelling was even more eccentric than that found in a typical eighteenth-century account.) Finally, Quaife’s footnotes often include biographical sketches of the people in the book.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The conquest of Illinois, which was wrested from the British in 1770, was recorded by Clark, the campaign's leader, ten years later. This volume reprints the 1920 edition published by Milo Milton Quaife, with its index and standardized spelling. Rand Burnette (history, MacMurray College, Jacksonville, Illinois) has written an introduction. Clark's narrative is a significant historical document and its reprinting will be welcome to historians and students alike. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781502965035
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
10/24/2014
Pages:
56
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.12(d)

Meet the Author

Rand Burnette is chair of the Department of History at MacMurray College in Jacksonville, Illinois.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Conquest of the Illinois 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous 3 months ago
Robert Louis Stevenson novels pale in comparison and this is not a novel! Clark and his men accomplished an amazing feat with their winter march to Vincennes. I cannot imagine wading through floods for days even in a mild winter. Great book -- read it.