The Conquest of the Ocean

The Conquest of the Ocean

4.2 4
by Brian Lavery
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

An engaging and vivid read by author and naval historian Brian Lavery, The Conquest of the Ocean tells the 5,000 year history of the remarkable individuals who sailed the seas for trade, to conquer new lands, and to explore the unknown. From the early Polynesian sailors to the first circumnavigations by the Portuguese and the British, The

Overview

An engaging and vivid read by author and naval historian Brian Lavery, The Conquest of the Ocean tells the 5,000 year history of the remarkable individuals who sailed the seas for trade, to conquer new lands, and to explore the unknown. From the early Polynesian sailors to the first circumnavigations by the Portuguese and the British, The Conquest of the Ocean explores the lives of these sailors and their tales of epic sea voyages, great feats of seamanship, navigation, endurance, and ingenuity.

Explore the lives of famous land-seekers and globe-charters such as Christopher Columbus, Captain James Cook, and Vitus Bering through eyewitness accounts of their maritime adventures. Full color photographs, paintings, diagrams, and maps are woven into the text to help tell the compelling stories of life at sea that lie behind man's search for new lands, new trade, conquest, and uncharted waters.

From the conquest of Mexico to World War II, and the voyages of the Vikings to the Exxon Valdez crisis, The Conquest of the Ocean covers the history of ships and sailing in times of exploration, war, discovery, and disaster.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Lavery (All Hands) presents a choppy survey of humanity’s history on the seas in this far-ranging volume. The prolific British maritime historian begins about 30,000 years ago with Polynesian seafarers’ colonization of Pacific islands and continues through to address harrowing accounts of modern-day piracy. Ports of call between these distant coasts include the treasure voyages of Ming official Zheng He, the discovery of the New World, the invention of the Fresnel lens, the Battle of Midway, and many others. Throughout the book, two-page insets highlight various technological milestones, such as the advent of the sextant and snapshots of the evolution of ships. Each receives a brief treatment and is sumptuously supplemented with maps and images. Yet like our understanding of the deep oceans themselves, Lavery’s account is woefully incomplete—a six-page section on whaling, for example, relies only on Captain Scoresby’s accounts and fails to even mention Moby Dick or devote a single sentence to the importance of fishing over the course of human history. Similarly, the 17th-century wreck of the Batavia is treated to a whole chapter, while the fate of the Titanic is summed up in a captioned illustration and one line. This is an adequate introduction to the topic for nautical neophytes, but salty sailors should slake their thirst elsewhere. Color maps, photos, and illus. throughout. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up—Lavery offers 5000 years of ocean history in this lavishly illustrated and readable work. Although stating that the oceans can never be conquered, he narrates many stories of bravery, perseverance, and greed that resulted in the exploration of unknown worlds. Beginning with the first sailors of Polynesia, the Mediterranean, China, and Arabia, and covering oceangoing activities until modern times, this book has a vast reach. Much of the text consists of first-person narratives, often personal and exciting in the telling of great dangers and adventures. Included are discussions of the great explorations of the New World; the unbelievable travels of the extraordinary 15th-century Chinese seaman Zhen He, covering 30,000 miles in a flotilla totaling 27,000 men; the vast Viking journeys; and the use of naval power as a force for conquest. In the modern era, luxury ocean liners, America's Cup races, and World Wars are reviewed as well as the vast oversea migrations of the 19th century. The voices quoted give substance to the facts and figures outlining victory and loss. Piracy is a constant theme; whether for personal gain or in the employ of monarchs, the oceans were fair game for theft and plunder. Fittingly the last chapter relates to the treacherous Somali pirates of today. Photos, reproductions, diagrams, or maps appear on almost every page. The well-researched and popularly presented text is aided by an ample glossary, bibliography, and index. Useful for research and enjoyable for leisure reading for students interested in naval history, exploration, and adventure.—Eva Elisabeth VonAncken, formerly at Trinity-Pawling School, Pawling, NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781465413871
Publisher:
DK
Publication date:
08/19/2013
Sold by:
DK
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
208,399
File size:
166 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Brian Lavery is Curator Emeritus at the National Maritime
Museum, Greenwich, London. He is the author of more
than thirty books on ships and seafaring, including
Ship: 500 Years of Maritime Adventure.
A highly respected maritime historian, he has appeared
on television programmes such as Time Team and
Timewatch and has acted as consultant on many
documentaries, including the BBC's Empire of the Seas.
He was consultant on the film Master and Commander:
The Far Side of the World, and advised on the replica
of Captain Cook's Endeavour. A skilled yachtsman, he
has considerable experience with traditional ships.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Conquest of the Ocean: An Illustrated History of Seafaring 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Runs in tires ans sweaty carrying her high heels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Looks at nick and says r u ga<_>y and says hi to becca
Anonymous More than 1 year ago