The Constitution in Congress: Democrats and Whigs, 1829-1861

Overview

This acclaimed series, which has been called a biography of the U.S. Constitution, continues its examination of the role that the legislative and executive branches have played in the development of constitutional interpretation. While legal scholars typically look to the courts for guidance in deciphering the Constitution, The Constitution in Congress offers an indispensable survey of the congressional and executive history behind the development of the Constitution.

This third...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$24.50
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$30.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $27.88   
  • New (8) from $27.88   
  • Used (1) from $28.24   
The Constitution in Congress: Democrats and Whigs, 1829-1861

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$19.99
BN.com price
(Save 33%)$30.00 List Price

Overview

This acclaimed series, which has been called a biography of the U.S. Constitution, continues its examination of the role that the legislative and executive branches have played in the development of constitutional interpretation. While legal scholars typically look to the courts for guidance in deciphering the Constitution, The Constitution in Congress offers an indispensable survey of the congressional and executive history behind the development of the Constitution.

This third volume in David P. Currie's series, the early installments of which dealt with the Federalist period and the Jeffersonian era, now turns to the Jacksonian revolution of 1829 and the subsequent efforts by Democrats to dismantle Henry Clay's celebrated "American System" of nationalist economics. Currie relates and analyzes the ultimately successful efforts of Democratic presidents and their congressional allies to limit federal intervention in the economy, whether by supporting internal improvements, maintaining a national bank, establishing protective tariffs, or disposing of the public lands. Currie covers the political events of the period leading up to the start of the Civil War, showing how the slavery question, although seldom overtly discussed in the debates included in this volume, underlay the Southern insistence on strict interpretation of federal powers.

Like its predecessors, The Constitution in Congress: Democrats and Whigs, 1829-1861 will be an invaluable reference for legal scholars and constitutional historians alike.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

CBA Record
"Currie has presented the arguments and debates in an even handed, clearly edited and heavily footnoted fashion that enables the reader to understand the impact of Congress and the Presidency on the development of the Constitution. . .  . I recommend it for the quality of Currie's research, analysis and writing. Like any good study of history, its value lies in showing us examples from the past as guides to the present."
Historian
"Historians will benefit from this legal scholar's lively perspective on antebellum constitutional controversies. This volume is a treasure trove of insights on fundamental questions of national development as well as minor issues that often meant much to the people and the states."
Law & Politics Book Review
"A first-rate descriptive account of constitutional debates during the middle part of the nineteenth century. Hence, Currie succeeds once again."
H-Net
"This is meant to be a comprehensive reference work, not a thesis-driven interpretative analysis. . . . The very topic of this work and its research base—grinding through those interminably boring congressional debates—could have resulted in an extraordinarily tedious book. This book is not, largely because of Profesor Currie's lively, colloquial, and downright folksy prose. . . . This is one good read!"
Journal of Interdisciplinary History
“David P. Currie’s discussion is meticulous and informative. It is difficult to believe that he leaves unaddressed anything that would shed light on American constitutional development.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226116310
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 11/19/2013
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 1,099,656
  • Product dimensions: 6.60 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

David P. Currie (1936-2007) was the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago. He is the author of the three other volumes in the Constitution in Congress series and the award-winning two-volume history The Constitution in the Supreme Court, all published by the University of Chicago Press.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

PREFACE

ABBREVIATIONS AND SHORTENED TITLES

Part One: Death of a System

INTRODUCTION TO PART ONE

CHAPTER 1: INTERCOURSE

I. The Maysville Road

II. Rivers and Harbors

III. Ebb Tide

IV. The Undelivered Veto

V. Congress Insists (A Little)

VI. Tonnage Duties

VII. The Iron Horse

VIII. The Golden Gate

IX. The Telegraph

CHAPTER 2: THE PUBLIC LANDS

I. The 1833 Distribution Bill

II. The 1841 Distribution Law

III. The Mad

IV. The Learned

V. The Footloose

CHAPTER 3: THE BANK WAR

I. President Jackson's Veto

II. Removal of the Deposits

A. The Statute

B. The President's Powers

C. Censure and Protest

D. Expungement

E. Ruminations

III. State Banks and State Treasuries

IV. And Tyler Too

CHAPTER 4: CUSTOMS

I. The South Carolina Exposition

II. The Hayne-Webster Debate

III. The Nullification Ordinance

IV. President Jackson's Response

V. The Compromise of 1833

VI. Cadenza

Part Two: The Kitchen Sink

CHAPTER 5: ENUMERATED AND LIMITED POWERS

I. Admiralty and Commerce

II. The Broken Bench

III. The Smithsonian

IV. Retrocession

V. Prayers

VI. Spoils

CHAPTER 6: PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT

I. The Veto

A. The President's Pocket

B. Tippecanoe

C. Mr. Tyler and the Bank

D. Mr. Clay's Amendment

E. Mr. Tyler and the Tariff

F. Winding Down

II. The Appointing Power

III. The Sanctity of the Cabinet

IV. His Accidency

V. Casting Votes and Other Quiddities

CHAPTER 7: ALL ABOUT JUDGES

I. The Impeachment of Judge Peck

II. Another Who Got Away

III. The Wheeling Bridge

IV. The Court of Claims

V. Good Behavior

CHAPTER 8: MORE MISCREANTS

I. Sam Houston

II. Miss Otis Regrets

III. The Caning of Senator Sumner

IV. The Sins of Orsamus Matteson

V. Immunity

CHAPTER 9: JUDGING CONGRESSIONAL ELECTIONS

I. Threshold Questions

II. Vacancies

A. Mississippi

B. Kentucky

C. Vermont

III. The Three I's

A. Illinois

B. Eligibility Encore

C. Indiana and Iowa

CHAPTER 10: OTHER ELECTION ISSUES

I. Districts

A. Time, Place, and Manner

B. Co-Opting the States

C. Undoing the Deed

II. The Speaker

III. The Snowstorm of 1856

CONCLUSION

APPENDIX A. DRAMATIS PERSONAE

APPENDIX B. PRINCIPAL OFFICERS, 1829-1861

APPENDIX C. THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES

INDEX

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)