The Contest Between the Sun and the Wind: An Aesop's Fable

The Contest Between the Sun and the Wind: An Aesop's Fable

by Heather Forest, Susan Gaber
     
 

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In this retelling of a classic fable from Aesop, we learn that being the most forceful does not make you the strongest. Sometimes the greatest strength comes from a place of gentleness.See more details below

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Overview

In this retelling of a classic fable from Aesop, we learn that being the most forceful does not make you the strongest. Sometimes the greatest strength comes from a place of gentleness.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
As he watches a man in an overcoat walk down a road, the Sun challenges the bragging Wind to a contest of strength. Which one of them can take the coat off the man? The Wind blows as mightily as he can; the man just clutches his coat more tightly. But when the Sun shines ever more brightly, and the man finally takes his coat off. The Sun tells the amazed Wind that he did not force the man, but �[t]hrough gentleness � won [his] way.� The text is brief and simple, with an occasional rhyme. Gaber employs impressionistic symbols rather than naturalism for the visual tale. The first double-page scene, a gray bird�s eye view of the countryside near a city, is sparked by a meandering yellow ribbon of a path or road. Turning the page, we see it is a path to a cliff, with the man surrealistically walking over the airborne path to another cliff. The Wind is depicted as a round gray head with bulging eyes and sharp teeth; the smiling yellow Sun emits multiple yellow rays. Spattered paint suggests the fury of the whipping wind, while the peaceful ending includes rainbows, cavorting horn-players, and animals joining the smiling sun. In a final note, the author asks, �Can gentleness, instead of force, be an effective way to achieve a goal?� Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

K-Gr 5- This fable is beautifully retold in simple verse, bringing a timeless message to young readers. A man walks along a winding road and is thrown in the middle of a contest between the Sun and the Wind over who can get him to take off his coat. The magical setting and the conflict between the two elements is brought out well in the highly fanciful, painterly illustrations. The Wind, depicted as an angry green-eyed face with bushy eyebrows, tries to blow the coat off the man, but all the huffing and puffing only prompts him to clutch the garment tighter. Then the Sun comes out, also round-faced, but with a gentle smile and rainbow-colored eyes, and warms the surroundings slowly so that the man slips off his jacket and sits down under a tree. The Wind asks, "How did you FORCE him to take off his coat?" Wisely the Sun replies, "Through gentleness I won my way." A spread at the end shows the man playing the flute and tumbling down a rainbow, evoking the happiness and transformation caused by the Sun's gentle approach, with the flummoxed Wind looking down on the scene.-Monika Schroeder, American Embassy School Library, New Delhi, India

Kirkus Reviews
Forest preserves the basic plot of this brief Aesopian chestnut, but recasts the language into typically buoyant, often-rhymed cadences that highlight the Wind's brutality and the Sun's gentleness. Likewise, in the sky over a fanciful landscape through which a lone man in modern dress treks, Gaber pairs off a soft but solid-looking orb sporting rainbow-colored eyes and a benevolent smile against a stormy spirit that is all fierce scowls and swirls of spattered paint. Dedicated "to Peace Makers everywhere," this fresh rendition will please young eyes and ears; consider it as an alternative to the older versions illustrated by Bernadette Watts (1992), Tomie DePaola (1995) or Bee Willey (2000). (Picture book/folktale. 6-10)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781939160669
Publisher:
August House Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
04/16/2013
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,370,221
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
AD460L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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