The Control of Childbirth: Mothers Versus Medicine Through the Ages

Overview

When childbirth moved from women's homes into hospitals, women lost more than they had bargained for. As the event became increasingly male-dominated and medically oriented, women's control of the experience all but vanished. Worse, recent clinical trials have demonstrated that most modern interventions and technological practices have not improved delivery outcomes and are not necessary in normal labor and birth. From pre-classical to present times, this work describes childbirth practices as they have developed...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $14.82   
  • New (2) from $30.50   
  • Used (6) from $14.82   
Sending request ...

Overview

When childbirth moved from women's homes into hospitals, women lost more than they had bargained for. As the event became increasingly male-dominated and medically oriented, women's control of the experience all but vanished. Worse, recent clinical trials have demonstrated that most modern interventions and technological practices have not improved delivery outcomes and are not necessary in normal labor and birth. From pre-classical to present times, this work describes childbirth practices as they have developed through the ages. The author describes and critiques the evolution of modern midwifery and obstetrics, focusing especially on how, why, and when the process of childbirth became an increasingly sterile, male-dominated, and medically oriented event. Each chapter focuses on a different period, from the age of the female midwife (who oversaw the childbirth process for several centuries), through the origins of modern obstetrics and gynecology, and finally, to the increasing influence of technology in the practices that have prevailed for most of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786433629
  • Publisher: McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
  • Publication date: 2/29/2008
  • Pages: 222
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 0.53 (d)

Meet the Author

Phyllis L. Brodsky has been a nurse, hospital clinical educator, and university instructor. Also the author of articles and chapters in journals and manuals, she lives in Berlin, Maryland.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments     vii
Foreword   Mary Ann Shah     1
Preface     5
Introduction     7
Childbirth in Primitive and Ancient Times     11
The Middle Ages: An Era of Despair and Persecution     22
The Sixteenth Century: A Renaissance     35
The Seventeenth Century: Men and Their Instruments     44
The Eighteenth Century: Men and Science     54
The Nineteenth Century: Men and Disease     67
Childbirth in Early America     85
Nineteenth-Century America: The Birth of Obstetrics and Gynecology     97
Early Twentieth-Century America: The "Midwife Problem" and Medicalized Childbirth     117
The Second Half of the Twentieth Century: Technology-Managed Childbirth, By Edna Quinn     137
The Twenty-First Century: Technological Childbirth Challenged     162
Conclusion: Women in Power     179
Notes     185
Bibliography     201
Index     209
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)