Conversations: Walter Murch and the Art of Editing Film

Overview

From one of our most celebrated novelists, here are Michael Ondaatje's conversations with the film and sound editor Walter Murch. Their exchange reveals behind-the-scenes glimpses of the directors Francis Ford Coppola, George Lucas, Philip Kaufman, Anthony Minghella, and Fred Zinnemann, and inside talk on how a film is put together and how editing differs in film and writing. Equally at east talking about films, music, medieval architecture, or quantum physics, Murch has worked on such iconic films as the ...
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Overview

From one of our most celebrated novelists, here are Michael Ondaatje's conversations with the film and sound editor Walter Murch. Their exchange reveals behind-the-scenes glimpses of the directors Francis Ford Coppola, George Lucas, Philip Kaufman, Anthony Minghella, and Fred Zinnemann, and inside talk on how a film is put together and how editing differs in film and writing. Equally at east talking about films, music, medieval architecture, or quantum physics, Murch has worked on such iconic films as the reconstructed Touch of Evil, The Godfather I-III, Apocalypse Now, The Conversation, The Unbearable Lightness of Being, and The English Patient.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Ask most moviegoers, "Who is Walter Murch?" and they're likely to stare uncomprehendingly. Ondaatje (The English Patient) seeks to eradicate that ignorance by providing an expert analysis of Murch's consummate film editing skills, and pointing out along the way the monumental contributions editors make to motion pictures. Murch, a three time Oscar winner and integral collaborator on such cinematic milestones as The Godfather, Julia, The English Patient and American Graffiti, attended the University of Southern California with George Lucas and bonded early on with UCLA film student Francis Ford Coppola. A relative neophyte, he worked on Coppola's The Rain People and a low-budget sci-fi picture, THX 1138, which has since become a cult classic. Murch adhered to a rule of not watching other movies while concentrating on a project of his own, calling himself a "queen bee who gets impregnated once and can lay millions of eggs afterwards." Through his eyes, and Ondaatje's remarkably insightful questions and comments, readers see how intricate the process is, and understand Murch when he says, "The editor is the only one who has time to deal with the whole jigsaw. The director simply doesn't." He also offers insightful thoughts on Orson Welles, Marlon Brando and Fred Zinnemann. Although Murch claims the actors on his films rarely know who he is, this excellent, eye-opening book done in a question-and-answer format will make readers glad Ondaatje has shown them the significant role he plays behind the scenes. Photos. (Sept.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
"Immensely stimulating....This book should be required reading for anyone working in film and a pleasurable option for moviegoers who wish to deepen and enrich the experience." — John Boorman, director of Deliverance, Hope and Glory and Excalibur, reviewing The Conversations in the LA Times

“As the subject of Michael Ondaatje’s offbeat, exhilarating new book, [Walter Murch] makes poetry out of an arcane, invisible craft…. Readers with even a passing interest in the movies should find many pleasures here…. The Conversations should be required reading for every aspiring writer — and anyone else involved in learning to shape a work of art.” — Quill & Quire

“Here's one of the more interesting cross-disciplinary meetings of minds to hit book form in some time…. In a series of long conversations recorded over a two-year period, Ondaatje and Murch, both highly intelligent and thoughtful artists, transcend the interview-book genre by following tangents, engaging in arguments, contextualizing everything and reminiscing…. this is compulsive and compulsory reading for anyone in film school or interested in film history." — NOW

The Conversations is an homage and an exegesis — effortlessly inquiring and creative. Constructed as a sequence of five discursive interviews … The Conversations is companionable, but not excluding, and intellectually exhaustive, though not for a moment tedious. The friendship of the two men throws an illuminating torch light on Murch’s shadowy profession. The editor should be thrilled to have his genius commemorated in this way…. The probing thoughtfulness Murch displays in his conversations with Ondaatje reveal a preoccupation not just with theory, but with the prospect of a system of notation that might provide a common language to a cinematic profession that is still, essentially, an infant one…. fascinating.” — The National Post

“It’s not often that a quick read provides so much insight.” — The Ottawa Citizen

“It is the movie book of the season, in fact, the movie book for every season…. engrossing … What the book sparks, aside from rarely probed thoughts about editing, is a desire to see again the movies Murch has edited and to do this at home hand in hand with reading it.” — The Toronto Star

The Conversations is delightful mainly for Ondaatje’s palpable pleasure, the novelist’s pleasure for eccentric characters discovered in emblematic moments. Murch … is certainly eccentric…. The Conversations faithfully represents Ondaatje’s reverance for a man normally beyond public attention.” — The Georgia Straight

“There’s much in store here for film fans…. many fascinating revelations about film as art.” — Star Phoenix (Saskatoon)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375413865
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/17/2002
  • Pages: 368
  • Product dimensions: 7.66 (w) x 9.42 (h) x 1.14 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael Ondaatje

Michael Ondaatje is the author of four previous novels, a memoir, and eleven books of poetry. His most recent novel, Anil’s Ghost, won the Governor General’s Award, the Giller Prize, the Prix Medicis, and the Irish Times Literature Prize. Born in Sri Lanka, he came to Canada in 1963 and apart from his books has made two documentary films. He lives in Toronto.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

FIRST CONVERSATION SAN FRANCISCO

In the spring of 2000,Walter Murch, at the suggestion of Francis Ford Coppola, began to re-edit Apocalypse Now, a film he had worked on back in 1977—1979 both as sound designer and as one of the four picture editors. Twenty-two years later, all the takes and discards and “lost” scenes and sound elements (carefully preserved in climate-controlled limestone caves in Pennsylvania) were brought out of vaults to be reconsidered. Apocalypse Now is a part of the American subconscious. And in some way this was the problem.Having dinner with the novelist Alfredo Véa in San Francisco, after spending my first day with Walter at Zoetrope, I mentioned what was happening with the re-editing of Apocalypse Now, and Véa immediately launched into Marlon Brando’s monologue about the snail on a razor blade. This was followed, during dinner, by Véa’s precise imitation of Dennis Hopper’s whine: “What are they gonna say about him? What are they gonna say? That he was a kind man? That he was a wise man? . . .” For Véa, who fought in Vietnam, Apocalypse Now was the movie about the war. It was the work of art that caught it for him, that gave him a mythological structure he could refer to, that showed him what he had gone through and would later write about himself in books such as Gods Go Begging. So those working on the new Apocalypse Now were aware that there would be problems connected with their dismantling and restructuring a “classic.” It was now public property.

“It has become part of the culture,” said Murch. “And that’s not a one-way street, as you know from your writing. As much as a work affects the culture, the culture mysteriously affects the work. Apocalypse Now in the year 2000 is a very different thing from the physically exact-same Apocalypse Now in the second before it was released in 1979.”

The idea for a new version grew out of Coppola’s desire to produce a DVD of Apocalypse Now with a number of major scenes that were–for reasons of length–eliminated from the 1979 version. Also, 2000 was the twenty-fifth anniversary of the fall of Saigon, so it seemed appropriate to re-evaluate editorial decisions that had originally been made while the war was still a vividly painful bruise on the nation’s psyche. But rather than have the restored scenes appear in isolation, appended in their own chapter, why not integrate them into the body of the film as originally intended? The problem was that the editing and sound work on the excised material had never been finished, and one scene in particular was eliminated before it was completely shot. Fortunately, the negative and original sound for all this material were perfectly preserved in original laboratory rolls, and could be retrieved, two decades later, as if the film had been shot a few weeks earlier.

And so Walter Murch was now working in San Francisco, in the old Zoetrope building. Mostly he had to collect and reconsider the material for three large sequences that were cut from the film in 1978–a medevac scene involving Playboy Bunnies; further scenes with Brando in the Kurtz compound; and a ghostly, funereal dinner and love scene at a French rubber plantation. In Eleanor Coppola’s book about the making of the film, she writes of this scene:

I heard the French plantation scene is definitely out of the picture. It never seemed to fit right. I am one of the people who liked it, but it did stop the flow of Willard’s journey. Today I was thinking about all the days of agony Francis went through during the shooting of that scene. The hundreds of thousands of dollars spent on the set and the cast flown in from France. Now the whole thing will end up as a roll of celluloid in a vault somewhere.

“The film acquired a body in the absence of these limbs,” said Murch, speaking of those missing scenes. “Now we’re trying to sew them back on, and who knows? Whether the body will accept or reject or find the addition difficult is something we’re struggling with right now. I have a sense of it and it’s actually been going quite well, but until we finally step back and look at the work as a whole, we won’t be able to say whether this will be artistically successful or whether it’s simply going to be a curiosity piece for those who were already interested in the film.”

The three scenes are the major additions in the new version of the film, but there are many other small changes that Murch and his colleagues were making– additions that give a different tone to much of the film. There is more humour, and with the addition of bridges between episodes that had been cut because of time concerns the film has also become less fragmentary. Those previously missing elements, said Murch,“were casualties of the hallmark struggle in every editing room: How short can the film be and still work? Even though Francis had final cut, he was as acutely aware as anybody of the strictures of getting a film into the theatres as lean as it could be.With the new version, that particular drive–for compression above all–is not as compelling.”

Much of our first conversation took place during four days in July 2000, while Walter worked on the new version of the film. Our talk during those days dealt with the “new” scenes but also with the differences and similarities between writing and editing, music, and his feelings about other editors. We talked as Walter worked on the Avid in his editing room at Zoetrope and later continued over lunch at a Chinese restaurant on Columbus Avenue. The new version of Apocalypse Now Redux would not open in theatres for almost a year, and Walter was still uncertain about several changes.

We began, however, by talking about the early days and how he became involved with the world of sound and eventually film.

HUMBLE SOUNDS

O: You’re an editor who works in sound as well as picture. You created “soundscapes” for films such as Apocalypse Now. When did you first become interested in this landscape of sound?

M: It was with me from as early as I can remember.Maybe I heard things differently because my ears stuck out, or maybe because my ears stuck out people thought I would hear things differently, so I obliged them. It’s hard to say. What’s true is that if words failed me I would switch to sound effects, I would imitate the sound of something if I didn’t know its name. Back then there was an animated cartoon character, a boy named Gerald McBoing-Boing, who spoke in sound effects instead of words, and he was able to communicate with his parents this way. That was my nickname:Walter McBoing-Boing.

Around that time the tape recorder was becoming available as a consumer item. The father of a friend of mine bought one, so I wound up going over to his house endlessly to play with it.And that passion, which was a kind of delirious drunkenness with what the tape recorder could do, completely possessed me. I eventually convinced my parents that it would be a good idea if our family had one, because we could then record music off the radio and wouldn’t have to buy records. In fact, I rarely used it for that, but I would hold the microphone out the window, recording sounds of New York. I would construct little arrangements of metal, and tape the microphone to them, striking and rubbing the metal in different places. It was fascinating.

And then I discovered the concept of physically editing tape–that you could rearrange it by cutting out sections and putting those sections in a different order.You could record two things at different times and juxtapose them, getting rid of the middle, or you could turn the tape upside down and play it backwards, or flip it over and play it back muffled, or any combination of these things.

O: So did European movements such as musique concrète in the fifties inspire you?

M: Definitely. I came home from school one day and turned on the classical radio station,WQXR, in the middle of a program. Sounds were coming out of the speaker that raised the hair on the back of my neck. I turned the tape recorder on and listened for the next twenty minutes or so, riveted by what I was hearing. It turned out to be a record by Pierre Schaeffer and Pierre Henry–two of the early practitioners of musique concrète. I could hear a real similarity with what I had been doing–taking ordinary sounds and arranging them rhythmically, creating a kind of music on tape. In France at that time, people would go to concerts and a big speaker would be wheeled out onstage. Somebody would come out and turn the tape recorder on with a flourish, and the audience would sit there patiently listening to this composition being played back. Then at the end they’d all applaud. This was the future!

O: You were how old when this hit you?

M: Ten or eleven, something like that. It was intoxicating to realize that somebody else was doing the same things I was.Up to that point I’d thought that this was just my strange little hobby. But here was validation. There were adults in the world who took it seriously. I felt like Robinson Crusoe finding Friday’s footprint in the sand.

O:And these were essentially documentary recordings with an artistic structure?

M: It was an early, technically primitive form of sampling. What’s strange– only in retrospect–is that I didn’t follow through with it. By the time I was fifteen or sixteen, I had relegated all of this passion to my pre-adolescence–I thought I now had to get serious. Maybe I was going to be an architect. Or an oceanographer. Was I going to be . . . what? It was only in my early twenties that I discovered those early interests all came together in film.

O: Did someone like John Cage interest you,were you interested in what he was doing?

M: My father was a painter and tangentially involved in Cage’s world. We would go to some of his concerts. I appreciated them, but I was moved more by the idea of what he was doing–that by taking humble sounds out of their normal context you could make people pay attention and discover the musical elements in them. It was very close to what my father was doing in his paintings: taking discarded objects and arranging them in ways to make you see them with new eyes.

O:Was the interest in editing film something that existed at the same time? Or did it come much later?

M: When I was a student at Johns Hopkins, a group of us made some short silent films, and I discovered then that editing images had emotionally the same impact for me as editing sound. It was intoxicating. You write eloquently about that in Anil’s Ghost, about the state of mind of a doctor in the middle of surgery: You get to a place where time is not an issue at all, and you’re oddly at the centre of things but also you are not.You’re the person doing it, yet the feeling is that you’re not the origin of it, that somehow “it” is happening around you, that you are being used by this thing to help bring it into the world. I felt that way when I was eleven, playing with my tapes. I didn’t know how to interpret it then, but I discovered, when I was twenty, that editing images gave me the same feeling. Then when I got to the University of Southern California as a graduate student, both of those things–sound and picture–came together.

As I’ve gone through life, I’ve found that your chances for happiness are increased if you wind up doing something that is a reflection of what you loved most when you were somewhere between nine and eleven years old.

O: Yes–something that had and still has the feeling of a hobby, a curiosity.

M: At that age, you know enough of the world to have opinions about things, but you’re not old enough yet to be overly influenced by the crowd or by what other people are doing or what you think you “should” be doing. If what you do later on ties into that reservoir in some way, then you are nurturing some essential part of yourself. It’s certainly been true in my case. I’m doing now, at fifty-eight, almost exactly what most excited me when I was eleven.

But I went through a whole late-adolescent phase when I thought: Splicing sounds together can’t be a real occupation, maybe I should be a geologist or teach art history.

O: Did you think of going into the sciences at all?

M: No. Although I was interested in them–and interested in math–as revelations of hidden patterns. What you do as an editor is search for patterns, at both the superficial and ever deeper levels–as deep as you can go.

The fact is that there is always much more film shot than can ever be included in the finished product: on average, about twenty-five times too much–which would mean fifty hours of material for a two-hour film. Sometimes the ratio is as high as a hundred to one, as it was on Apocalypse Now. And films are almost always shot out of sequence, which means that on the same day the crew could find themselves filming scenes from the beginning, the end, and the middle of the script. This is done to make the schedule more efficient, but it means that someone–the editor–must take on the responsibility for finding the best material out of that great surplus and putting it in the correct order. Although there is a universe of complexity hidden in those short words “best” and “correct.”

When it works, film editing–which could just as easily be called “film construction”– identifies and exploits underlying patterns of sound and image that are not obvious on the surface. Putting a film together is, in an ideal sense, the orchestrating of all those patterns, just like different musical themes are orchestrated in a symphony. It is all pretty mysterious. It’s right at the heart of the whole exercise.

HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL

O: How did you go from being that boy in New York to someone working in film in California?

M: I was studying art history and Romance languages in Italy and Paris, in ’63—’64, the height of the French New Wave. I came back to the States buzzing with the idea of film, and then I realized that there were actually schools where you could study it, which I found incredible, delicious, almost absurd. I applied to a number of them, and miraculously won a scholarship to the graduate program at USC. Strangely enough, I only discovered that films needed sound when I got there: it was a revelation to me that the sound had to be recorded separately from the image and “cooked”–edited and mixed–before it was finished. But I immediately saw the connection with what I had been doing twelve years earlier, and that was exciting.

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Table of Contents

Introduction xi
First Conversation 3
Humble Sounds
High School Confidential
"Strange Like Me"
Influences
Directors and Editors
Eyes Half Closed
There Is Only One First Time
The Dark Ages
"I'm not going to mix the picture upside down!"
Apocalypse Then and Now
Burning Celluloid
Brando
Willard's Gaze
On Editing Actors
The New Scenes
The Dead French
Apocalypse Now Redux
Second Conversation 87
The Right Time for the Invention of the Wheel
Murder Music
Five Types of Ambiguity
Two Rumours
Devil's Work
Watch How They Say It
"Ka-lunk"
Novels and Films-The Redundant Abundance
The Tragedy-of-Job Moments
"Wideo"
The Non-Film Way of Living
Third Conversation 151
Editing The Conversation
The Invisible Partner
The Minor Key
What's Under the Hands?
"Night Was Night": Re-editing Touch of Evil
"As if Orson was sending us notes"
The Wrong Echo
The Most Characteristic Angle
Fourth Conversation 201
Influences
Negative Twenty Questions
Enforced Idleness
Two Kinds of Filmmaking
Why Did He Like It Better?
Family Life
The Unanticipated Collisions of Things
A Pebble, A Cricket, A Wrench
"The Blue Looked Dead"
A Wrong Reading
Divergent/Convergent
The Disappearing Brother
Preludes
A Grease Pencil and Real Time
"Waiting for Provocation"
Last Conversation 279
Blessed Unrest
Writing Return to Oz
Just Below the Surface
A Wonderful Line from Rilke
Dreams
Miscellany
Murch and the Movies 314
Acknowledgements 319
Photo Credits 321
Index 325
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2002

    Editing is paramount

    BOOK REVIEW: Michael Ondaatje, "The Conversations: Walter Murch and the Art of Editing Film." New York: Knopf. 2000, 343 pp. Review by Harvey Karten. How many times have you seen a review comment on the editing, and if it praise or belittles the way the film is cut, how often is the responsible editor named? In his new book "The Conversations," author Michael Ondaatje has transcribed a series of talks with Walter Murch, considered by many to be without peer in the profession. The 59-year-old Renaissance man has been instrumental in creating the sounds and the cuts of films such as "American Graffiti," "The Conversation," "The Godfather I,II, III," "Julia," "Apocalypse Now," and "The English Patient." In introducing this seminal work on Walter Murch, Ondaatje informs us that Murch, like other editors, is concerned with a film's pace, of course, but even more with the moral tone of a work which has to do with speed, background noise, even how the antagonist may turn away from a conversation. Recall how many films have the editor cut away from a character before he finishes speaking. This could be because the editor encourages the audience to think only about the face value of what the character has said. If on the other hand the editor allows the audience to see from the expression in the actor's eyes that he is probably not telling the truth, he will linger on the character after he finishes speaking. Words and sounds are not all. Murch at times pulls all the sound out of the scene so that there is complete silence. This often means that something terrible is about to happen. And when sounds take place outside the room (as in the street sounds when Michael Corleone commits his first murder in "The Godfather"), we get the feeling that we are inside a cave-like room. Murch tosses in his personal theories about the nature of viewing a movie, among the most inciteful being this paradox: "One of the things about watching a video is that it never feels private. I'm always conscious of others in the room, so I become self-conscious during an erotic scene. But it never feels that way in a cinema, even at a comedy with people laughing around me." On a note more technical than philosophical he states, "....a sustained action scene averages out to 14 new camera positions a minute." When I used to take a class of tech high school students on a field trip to a Broadway show, I found that they were more interesting in discussing the big sound-mixing machine in the back of the orchestra than in chatting about the way Hamlet's vacillations were dealt with on the stage. "The Conversations" won't tell you how to work the editing machines, but Ondaatje does give you solid insight into the world of the editing profession in a reader-friendly, flowing style.

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    Posted March 18, 2011

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