The Conversion of Armenia to the Christian Faith

The Conversion of Armenia to the Christian Faith

by William St. Clair Tisdall
     
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally… See more details below

Overview

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781290753517
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
08/01/2012
Pages:
264
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.55(d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III MYTHOLOGY OF THE ANCIENT ARMENIANS 'O 0co? 6 1ro1rlaas Rov Koapov Kat Standvro, rti ev avry . . . e1roir]otv re i£ evos 1rav e9vos avBpu1rasv xaro1Ke1v M iravrus 1rpoaui1rov rrjs yijs . . . fontf Rov Qeov, d dpa ye tfrla1p-liae1av avruv 1ctd evpo1iv.—Acts xvii. 24-27. While the various tribes which composed the Armenian nation doubtless had each their own favourite deities, many of which had a purely local importance, it may be observed as a general truth that the ancient religion of Armenia, though at one time greatly influenced by Assyrian mythology, was very similar to that of the ancient Persians as preserved for us in the Zend Avesta. Comparison between the Rig-Veda, of India, the Zend Avesta of Persia, the Homeric Poems and Hesiod's Theogony of Greece, and the mythology of the Romans, the Teutons, the ancient Scandinavians and the Norse tribes, shows that, under different names, very much the same deities were worshipped in ancient times by all the nations of the Aryan race. But the chief deities of Armenia, in their names as well as in their attributes, certainly show a very strong Iranic influence ; which, however, had more power to change the names of the deities than to make any very real alteration in the attributes ascribed to them. The chief god of the Armenian mythology %vas styled Aramazd, the same name as that of the Ahura Mazda of the Zend Avesta and of the inscriptions of Darius and Xerxes. But while Ahura Mazda seems to have had no consort and no children, Aramazd was considered as the father of at least all the more important of the Armenian deities. He was the ' Creator of Heaven and Earth,' and was omniscient, the giver of all earthlygood things, the bestower of health and wealth, of fullness and abundance. His most common title was '...

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