The Cool Crazy Crickets to the Rescue!

The Cool Crazy Crickets to the Rescue!

by David Elliott, Paul Meisel
     
 

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Leo, Phoebe, Miranda, and Marcus, the friendly neighborhood kids (and Noodles the dog, their mascot) who started the club featured in THE COOL CRAZY CRICKETS, are back for a second book of easy-to-read adventures. On a quest for summer pocket money, they’re busy little-brother-sitting, pet-sitting, and running a lemonade stand. But when a one-eyed stray cat

Overview

Leo, Phoebe, Miranda, and Marcus, the friendly neighborhood kids (and Noodles the dog, their mascot) who started the club featured in THE COOL CRAZY CRICKETS, are back for a second book of easy-to-read adventures. On a quest for summer pocket money, they’re busy little-brother-sitting, pet-sitting, and running a lemonade stand. But when a one-eyed stray cat needs their help, will all their hard work be for nothing? The Crickets and their exploits — humorously illustrated by Paul Meisel — will have beginning readers jumping to join this cool crazy club!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Elliott's (An Alphabet of Rotten Kids!) light and jaunty tale introduces four friends who decide to launch a club. In four short chapters, animated by Meisel's (How to Talk to Your Cat) snappy watercolor-and-ink illustrations, the quartet wrestles with the challenges of finding a name, clubhouse, mascot and raison d' tre for their club. The discussions surrounding the headquarters and mascot receive the most diverting text and visuals. After rejecting for a clubhouse the options of Phoebe's food-littered bedroom and Marcus's room (also occupied by his incessantly jabbering baby brother), the pals tape together two cardboard refrigerator boxes and construct a place of their own. And Leo's dog, Noodles, makes a comical, Snoopy-like attempt to demonstrate his many talents as the members list the ideal attributes of a club mascot. Quick-paced dialogue, brief sentences and a generous smattering of art make this a solid choice for youngsters ready to step up from picture books. The publisher's catalogue promises another adventure with these club members in the near future. Ages 6-8. (June) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
Four chapters, in what may become a series, chronicle the origin of the Cool Crazy Crickets club. We meet the variously hued kids, two boys and two girls, who are working out the club name. Then, they need to find a clubhouse, consider their own bedrooms as ultimately unsuitable, and finally make their own clubhouse. A refrigerator delivery person provides two huge boxes and the result is a nifty hand-decorated new clubhouse. The third chapter introduces the term "mascot" and different pets are considered but the personable dog Noodles finally earns it paws down. The last chapter is a letdown because the issue is whether the club will have a purpose beyond being friends. (No. That's it). However, Meisel's cheerful cartoon illustrations, his perfect eye for children's artwork and dress will attract readers ready for more than the I-Can-Read level but not quite ready for Polk Street School or Junie B. Jones. Plenty of conversation, lots of white space, and text doled out a little at a time give the book an approachable look. And the characters seem like people that you would like to have as your own neighbors. A good addition to the second-grade shelf. 2000, Candlewick, Ages 6 to 8, $14.99. Reviewer: Susan Hepler—Children's Literature
Children's Literature
The four members of the Cool Crazy Crickets are eager to earn money since they have ruled against dues. So they take on babysitting, which turns out to be tougher than they thought. They try selling lemonade and pet-walking Tiny, a huge Irish wolfhound, who goes crazy when a strange, one-eyed cat appears in the neighborhood. The club mascot, Noodles the dog, saves the day by chasing the cat away. The club is about to decide how to spend their saved money when the one-eyed cat turns up sick in their clubhouse. They do the right thing—offer a vet fourteen dollars to cure the cat, who then becomes a mascot for the mascot, Noodles, and because the cat is a keeper, that's what they name her. This four-chapter book, a sequel to The Cool Crazy Crickets, is just right for readers who have mastered the I-Can-Read level of Henry and Mudge books and are ready for a little more text. Pictures on every page lighten the task, the children behave and talk like real kids, it is clearly a multicultural, middle-class neighborhood, and the theme is kid-worthy. On the subject of moneymaking, check out Owen Foote, Money Man, which invites slightly older readers to consider some of the same dilemmas on a different level. The "Cool Crazy Crickets" series is just right for first and second graders—with themes and choices worth discussing in small, assisted reading groups. 2001, Candlewick Press, $13.99 and $4.50. Ages 5 to 8. Reviewer: Susan Hepler
School Library Journal
Gr 2-3-The Cool Crazy Crickets, first introduced in the book by that name (Candlewick, 2000), are back. In this title, Leo, Phoebe, Marcus, and Miranda are looking for a way to earn money. Baby-sitting, pet-sitting, and a lemonade stand bring in some cash while suggestions for spending it range from art supplies to a periscope. However, when a sick, one-eyed cat makes her home in their clubhouse, the children have a better plan for the money; they take her to a kindhearted vet who nurses her back to health. Enhanced by Meisel's watercolor-and-ink drawings, this title is suitable for children ready for short chapter books. An easygoing tale about summer days filled with friends, clubhouses, and lemonade stands.-Roxanne Burg, Thousand Oaks Library, CA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Flatly opposed to the idea of paying dues, clubmates Leo, Phoebe, Miranda, and Marcus find other ways to raise money, then opt to spend it worthily in this followup to Cool Crazy Crickets (2000). With 14 hard-earned dollars to show for watching Marcus's horribly active little brother, pet-sitting a neighbor's nervous Irish wolfhound, and selling lemonade, the four friends argue about whether it should go for snacks or other frills. But when the one-eyed stray cat that has been strolling through Elliott's easy-reading chapters turns up in the Cricket clubhouse looking decidedly unwell, they quickly agree that a trip to the vet is in order. In freely sketched watercolors, Meisel (How to Talk to Your Cat, 2000, etc.) sets his multicultural quartet into a summery suburban neighborhood, and gives the cat, both before and after being nursed back to health with a week of TLC, an appealingly raffish look. Elliott partly devalues the Crickets' sacrifice by rewarding them with free treats from the local snack shop, but thoughtful younger readers will still get the story's point. (Fiction. 8-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763611163
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
06/01/2001
Pages:
56
Product dimensions:
5.67(w) x 7.77(h) x 0.44(d)
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

David Elliott says that his sister really does have a cat with one eye and that she was the inspiration for the cat in this story (the cat, not the sister).

Paul Meisel’s warm and whimsical style is well known, both through his many years of editorial work for the New York Times and the numerous children’s books he has illustrated, including HOW TO TALK TO YOUR CAT by Jean Craighead George. Paul Meisel spends his days drawing in his "clubhouse" in Connecticut, where he lives with his wife, three sons, and their "mascot," Rusty, a Brittany spaniel.

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