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The Copper Room
     

The Copper Room

5.0 1
by Henry Melton
 

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Jerry had the greatest study aid ever -- a copper room where time could be adjusted faster or slower, which he had helped his inventor uncle build. But being able to cram a fifteen hour study marathon into five minutes paled to the notion of spending some quality time with his new girlfriend Lil. So he contrived to steal her away from her overly protective parents for

Overview

Jerry had the greatest study aid ever -- a copper room where time could be adjusted faster or slower, which he had helped his inventor uncle build. But being able to cram a fifteen hour study marathon into five minutes paled to the notion of spending some quality time with his new girlfriend Lil. So he contrived to steal her away from her overly protective parents for just a moment -- long enough to spend a whole day with her. It worked perfectly, until they stumbled against the other set of controls and opened the door to the far future, with no way back!

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013450394
Publisher:
Wire Rim Books
Publication date:
11/30/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
248
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Henry Melton is often on the road with his wife Mary Ann, a nature photographer and frequently captivated by the places he visits. This has inspired his latest series of novels; Small Towns, Big Ideas. Formerly a programmer specializing in database work and web design, he pioneered Internet use for a Fortune 500 company until the tech bubble collapse. In the early days of home computers, he created one of the earliest commercial word processing programs, and built his own computers back when that meant wiring the chips together by hand to his own schematics.
Henry's short fiction has been published in many magazines and anthologies, most frequently in ANALOG. Catacomb, published in DRAGON magazine, is considered a classic, and by the continuing fan mail twenty years later, a formative influence among modern computer gaming programmers. Many of these are available for free on his website.
Other than an occasional short story, most of his time is spent writing science fiction YA novels. Currently being published by Wire Rim Books are the Small Towns, Big Ideas series of books, where high school aged heroes of the here and now are confronted with classic science fiction themes. The first, Emperor Dad, was the winner of the 2008 Darrell Award for Best Novel.
Sharing what he’s learned about the art, craft, and business of writing has been an on-going part of his life, from grade school readings to teaching formal classes and veranda coaching for the students of George Benson Christian College in Zambia during his 2007 trip to Africa.

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The Copper Room 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Benj-O More than 1 year ago
The Copper Room ¿ Henry Melton ©2011 Wire Rim Books, Hutto, Texas Christmas came early for me this year. I arrived at the post just a couple of short weeks ago to find a copy of Henry Melton¿s latest installment in the Small Towns, Big Ideas series. When I find such a wonderful prize waiting for me, it¿s hard to finish the reading I¿m doing before cracking open the new title from Melton. But I restrained myself (for at least three days), then got right down to business and was (as always) glad I did. Each volume of Melton¿s YA series focuses on a teenage protagonist (or set of same) and the adventures they encounter. Most of the stories include a bit of romantic tension, but this is the first time that the relationship between our two main characters (Jerry and Lil) are thrust into situations that cause their ¿puppy love¿ feelings blossom more quickly than most. Jereomy Harris helps his Uncle Greg build a copper Faraday Cage large enough to be a room. The point behind the invention is to make time stand still (inside or out). It¿s the perfect place for Jerry to catch up/keep up with his studies for the last few months of High School. He can cram eight hours of study time in the room into about thirty seconds in the real world time. Then he meets Uncle Greg¿s neighbor¿s daughter, Lillian. Lil is a cheerleader for a rival school. But that matters not to the two teenagers. They start seeing each other, then by accident they bump the controls to the Copper Room hurtling them decades into the future. During the course of the adventure, they learn to operate the room keeping them out of trouble, while at the same time letting them influence change in society (even when society has taken it upon itself to self-destruct). What makes this time travel story different from most (including Melton¿s own previous venture into the time travel genre) time travel stories is that Jerry¿s time machine only lets travelers go in a forward direction. What makes this new story a different step for Henry is his dabble into romantic teenage struggles. I must applaud him on giving his characters restraint and commitment to purity. He deals with history, future speculation, what-ifs concerning not only traveling in time, but also life on other planets, space travel, and re-establishment of a society after nuclear war. And he does it in a superb and readable manner. Thanks for the early Christmas, Henry. And reader, even if you don¿t get to enjoy this story before Christmas, get it and enjoy it afterwards. I¿m sure that you¿ll enjoy it as much as I did. Five reading glasses. ¿Benjamin Potter, December 22, 2011 [This book was provided for review by Wire Rim Books of Hutto, Texas. Opinions are my own.]