The Courtship of Olivia Langdon and Mark Twain

The Courtship of Olivia Langdon and Mark Twain

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by Susan K. Harris
     
 

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Passionate readers both, Olivia Langdon and Mark Twain courted through books, spelling out their expectations through literary references as they corresponded during their frequent separations. Working with Langdon's own letters and diaries as well as Twain's, Harris traces the progress of their courtship within the larger context of Victorian American culture,

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Overview

Passionate readers both, Olivia Langdon and Mark Twain courted through books, spelling out their expectations through literary references as they corresponded during their frequent separations. Working with Langdon's own letters and diaries as well as Twain's, Harris traces the progress of their courtship within the larger context of Victorian American culture, showing how the couple negotiated their relationship through the mediums of literature, material culture, and social and familial dynamics.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Harris nimbly interweaving texts (letters, diaries) and contexts, dispels the mystery, bringing back the real Mrs. Twain: a woman of genuine intellectual reach, and a passionate reader in an era where that passion could itself be a kind of art." The New Yorker

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521556507
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
02/28/1997
Series:
Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture Series, #101
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
221
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.67(d)

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The Courtship of Olivia Langdon and Mark Twain 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
JBKNY More than 1 year ago
Using recently discovered letters from Clemens to Langdon, the author reveals a much more complete picture of both. "Livy" was not the hypochondriac or Victorian prude she is often made out to be, nor was Twain an overbearing, domineering figure in their relationship. Both were interested in a relationship of equals with their differing gifts. Langdon's world was much more reform-minded and had more of an activist bent than most other authors have seen. Recommended for those who want to know more about either figure and their remarkable relationship.