The cowboy; his characteristics, his equipment, and his part in the development of the West [NOOK Book]

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III DEFINITIONS AND COWBOY WAYS VARIOUS TITLES FOR COWBOY—VARIOUS DEFINITIONS—NO TYPICAL COW- BOY—USB OF PISTOL—DANGEROUS ANIMALS—BEAR-DOGS—LOCO-WEED— SHOOTING AT TENDERFOOTS' FEET—ITS INCENTIVE—CARRIAGE AND SHOOT- ING OF ...
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The cowboy; his characteristics, his equipment, and his part in the development of the West

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III DEFINITIONS AND COWBOY WAYS VARIOUS TITLES FOR COWBOY—VARIOUS DEFINITIONS—NO TYPICAL COW- BOY—USB OF PISTOL—DANGEROUS ANIMALS—BEAR-DOGS—LOCO-WEED— SHOOTING AT TENDERFOOTS' FEET—ITS INCENTIVE—CARRIAGE AND SHOOT- ING OF PISTOL—EXTENT OF LATTER'S USE—PISTOL NOT ALWAYS NECES-- SITY—BAD MAN, PSEUDO AND ACTUAL—PISTOL AS NOISE-MAKER—RIFLE, ITS TRANSPORT AND NAMES—CREASING AND WALKING DOWN MUSTANGS— VARIOUS DEFINITIONS—INTIMACY WITH HORSES—THEIR NAMES, COLORA- TION AND SECTIONAL DIFFERENCES—KILLING HORSES—SIGNALLING— KNIFE—LARIAT The cowboy was not always called "cowboy." He everywhere was equally well known as "cowpuncher" or "puncher," "punching" being the accepted term for the herding of live stock. In Oregon he frequently was called "baquero," "buckaroo," "buckhara," or "buckayro," each a perversion of either the Spanish "vaquero," or the Spanish "boyéro," and each subject to be contracted into '' bucker.'' In Wyoming he preferred to be styled a " rider." To these various legitimate titles, conscious slang added "bronco peeler," "bronco twister," and "bronco buster." He was a cowboy or cowpuncher whether his charges were cattle or horses. There were no such terms as horse-boy or horse puncher. Thus called a cowboy when his task was riding as an employee, he lost that title as soon as he became a ranch- owner; and, according to the kind of stock he raised, was termed a"horse man" or else interchangeably a "cowman," "cattleman," or "cattle man." While a cattle man and a cattleman were identical, a horse man and a horseman were not. Of the latter the first raised horses, the second was either a mounted person or one versed in horsemanship. Curiously, though the word "puncher" was created but a comparatively few decades since, its derivation is now unknown un...
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940019366071
  • Publisher: New York, C. Scribner's sons
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1922 volume
  • File size: 650 KB

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CHAPTER III DEFINITIONS AND COWBOY WAYS VARIOUS TITLES FOR COWBOY—VARIOUS DEFINITIONS—NO TYPICAL COW- BOY—USB OF PISTOL—DANGEROUS ANIMALS—BEAR-DOGS—LOCO-WEED— SHOOTING AT TENDERFOOTS' FEET—ITS INCENTIVE—CARRIAGE AND SHOOT- ING OF PISTOL—EXTENT OF LATTER'S USE—PISTOL NOT ALWAYS NECES-- SITY—BAD MAN, PSEUDO AND ACTUAL—PISTOL AS NOISE-MAKER—RIFLE, ITS TRANSPORT AND NAMES—CREASING AND WALKING DOWN MUSTANGS— VARIOUS DEFINITIONS—INTIMACY WITH HORSES—THEIR NAMES, COLORA- TION AND SECTIONAL DIFFERENCES—KILLING HORSES—SIGNALLING— KNIFE—LARIAT The cowboy was not always called "cowboy." He everywhere was equally well known as "cowpuncher" or "puncher," "punching" being the accepted term for the herding of live stock. In Oregon he frequently was called "baquero," "buckaroo," "buckhara," or "buckayro," each a perversion of either the Spanish "vaquero," or the Spanish "boyéro," and each subject to be contracted into '' bucker.'' In Wyoming he preferred to be styled a " rider." To these various legitimate titles, conscious slang added "bronco peeler," "bronco twister," and "bronco buster." He was a cowboy or cowpuncher whether his charges were cattle or horses. There were no such terms as horse-boy or horse puncher. Thus called a cowboy when his task was riding as an employee, he lost that title as soon as he became a ranch- owner; and, according to the kind of stock he raised, was termed a "horse man" or else interchangeably a "cowman," "cattleman," or "cattle man." While a cattle man and a cattleman were identical, a horse man and a horseman were not. Of the latter the firstraised horses, the second was either a mounted person or one versed in horsemanship. Curiously, though the word "puncher" was created but a comparatively few decades since, its derivation is now unknown un...
Read More Show Less

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