The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution Will Create Better Health Care

The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution Will Create Better Health Care

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by Eric Topol
     
 

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What if your cell phone could detect cancer cells circulating in your blood or warn you of an imminent heart attack? Mobile wireless digital devices, including smartphones and tablets with seemingly limitless functionality, have brought about radical changes in our lives, providing hyper-connectivity to social networks and cloud computing. But the digital world has

Overview

What if your cell phone could detect cancer cells circulating in your blood or warn you of an imminent heart attack? Mobile wireless digital devices, including smartphones and tablets with seemingly limitless functionality, have brought about radical changes in our lives, providing hyper-connectivity to social networks and cloud computing. But the digital world has hardly pierced the medical cocoon.

 Until now. Beyond reading email and surfing the Web, we will soon be checking our vital signs on our phone. We can already continuously monitor our heart rhythm, blood glucose levels, and brain waves while we sleep. Miniature ultrasound imaging devices are replacing the icon of medicine—the stethoscope. DNA sequencing, Facebook, and the Watson supercomputer have already saved lives. For the first time we can capture all the relevant data from each individual to enable precision therapy, prevent major side effects of medications, and ultimately to prevent many diseases from ever occurring. And yet many of these digital medical innovations lie unused because of the medical community’s profound resistance to change. In The Creative Destruction of Medicine, Eric Topol—one of the nation’s top physicians and a leading voice on the digital revolution in medicine—argues that radical innovation and a true democratization of medical care are within reach, but only if we consumers demand it. We can force medicine to undergo its biggest shakeup in history. This book shows us the stakes—and how to win them.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
The director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute suggests that in the not-too-distant future DNA testing and sequencing may become available on a smartphone. The former chairman of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic and founder of its cardiovascular gene bank, Topol looks to a future in which genomics will be one of the major tools of innovative, individualized medicine. "What constitutes evidence-based medicine today is what is good for a large population," he writes, "not for any particular individual." Not so in the future. The author is aware of instances in which pharmaceutical companies attempt to violate the principle of evidence-based medicine by suppressing negative results. In fact, Topol was the first to reveal "significant heart attack and stroke concerns for both Vioxx and Celebrex," information he published in the New England Journal of Medicine. As a result of his whistle-blowing, he was forced out of his position at the Clinic in 2004, when the two drugs were finally removed from the market. The author explains how "the large-scale randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed under the most rigorous conditions" will be superseded by individualized medicine. Sequencing the human genome opened up major new areas of preventative medicine; in the future these procedures will be able to identify medications that will benefit, or be injurious to, a small portion of the population who carry a specific genetic mutation, rather than the population at large. Topol weaves useful knowledge about how to evaluate the choices open to patients into this exciting account of the revolutionary changes we can expect.
From the Publisher
"Topol weaves useful knowledge about how to evaluate the choices open to patients into this exciting account of the revolutionary changes we can expect." —Kirkus

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780465025503
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
01/31/2012
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.30(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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From the Publisher
"Topol weaves useful knowledge about how to evaluate the choices open to patients into this exciting account of the revolutionary changes we can expect." —-Kirkus

Meet the Author

Eric J. Topol, M.D., is professor of innovative medicine and the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla, California. Trained at Johns Hopkins University, he conducted one of the first trials of a genetically engineered protein for treating heart attacks, and was the founder of the world’s first cardiovascular gene bank at the Cleveland Clinic. He lives with his family in La Jolla, California.

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The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution is Creating Personalized Medicine for All 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dr. Topol presents a great argument for the benefit of personal genomics and electronic health records. Far from conspiracy or wild theories against Big Pharma, Topol is a scientist first and gives compelling evidence for genetic testing to revolutionize personal medication and dosing. This may be bit of a tough read for someone without any biology education, but still worth it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Topol weaves a world that is feasible here and now in his (first!) book for consumers. He goes to great lengths to convince the reader that medicine needs to change and evolve to accommodate the evolution (or revolution!) of those who depend on it. Consumers are becoming ever more aware of their own vitals and this book explains why physicians need to keep up and more importantly...how! GREAT READ!!!
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PokerfaceMom More than 1 year ago
How can a book about the digital revolution not be available in a digital format? I haven't read it yet, so ignore the rating, but one can't post without it.