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The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution Will Create Better Health Care
     

The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution Will Create Better Health Care

3.3 9
by Eric Topol, Dick Hill (Narrated by)
 

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Until very recently, if you were to ask most doctors, they would tell you there were only two kinds of medicine: the quack kind, and the evidence-based kind. The former is baseless, and the latter based on the best information human effort could buy, with carefully controlled double-blind trials, hundreds of patients, and clear indicators of success.Well, Eric

Overview

Until very recently, if you were to ask most doctors, they would tell you there were only two kinds of medicine: the quack kind, and the evidence-based kind. The former is baseless, and the latter based on the best information human effort could buy, with carefully controlled double-blind trials, hundreds of patients, and clear indicators of success.Well, Eric Topol isn't most doctors, and he suggests you entertain the notion of a third kind of medicine, one that will make the evidence-based state-of-the-art stuff look scarcely better than an alchemist trying to animate a homunculus in a jar. It turns out plenty of new medicines-although tested with what seem like large trials-actually end up revealing most of their problems only once they get out in the real world, with millions of people with all kinds of conditions mixing them with everything in the pharmacopeia. The unexpected interactions of drugs, patients, and diseases can be devastating. And the clear indicators of success often turn out to be minimal, often as small as one fewer person dying out of a hundred (or even a thousand), and often at exorbitant cost. How can we avoid these dangerous interactions and side-effects? How can we predict which person out of a hundred will be helped by a new drug, and which fatally harmed? And how can we avoid having to need costly drugs in the first place? It sure isn't by doing another four hundred-person trial. As Topol argues in The Creative Destruction of Medicine, it's by bringing the era of big data to the clinic, laboratory, and hospital, with wearable sensors, smartphone apps, and whole-genome scans providing the raw materials for a revolution. Combining all the data those tools can provide will give us a complete and continuously updated picture of every patient, changing everything from the treatment of disease, to the prolonging of health, to the development of new treatments. As revolutionary as the past twenty years in personal technology and medicine have been-remember phones the sizes of bricks that only made calls, or when the most advanced "genotyping" we could do involved discerning blood types and Rh-factorsδ-Topol makes it clear that we haven't seen a thing yet. With an optimism matched only by a realism gained through twenty-five years in a tough job, Topol proves the ideal guide to the medicine of the future-medicine he himself is deeply involved in creating.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Atul Gawande, M.D.,author of The Checklist Manifesto
“Dr. Eric Topol is an extraordinary doctor. He's started a leading medical school, identified the first genes to underlie development of heart disease, led major medical centers, and been a pioneer of wireless medicine. But he is also a remarkable communicator—one of the few top-flight scientists in medicine to be able to genuinely connect with the public. He was, for example, the first physician researcher to question the safety of Vioxx—and unlike most who raise safety questions, actually succeed in bringing the concerns to public attention. I have known and admired Dr. Topol for a long time. I recommend him highly.”

A. J. Jacobs, author of My Life as an Experiment and The Year of Living Biblically
“It may sound like hyperbole, but it's true: Medicine is undergoing its biggest revolution since the invention of the germ theory. As Eric Topol writes, thirty years ago, ‘digital medicine' referred to rectal examinations. Dr. Topol is both a leader of and perfect guide to this brave new health world. His book should be prescribed for doctors and patients alike.”

Brook Byers, Partner, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers
“This is the one book to read for a complete and clear view of our medical future, as enabled by the convergence of digital, mobile, genomic, and life science breakthroughs. Dr. Topol explains how iPhones, cloud computing, gene sequencing, wireless sensors, modernized clinical trials, internet connectivity, advanced diagnostics, targeted therapies and other science will enable the individualization of medicine—and force overdue radical change in how medicine is delivered, regulated, and reimbursed. This book should be read by patients, doctors, scientists, entrepreneurs, insurers, regulators, digital engineers—anyone who wants better health, lower costs, and participation in this revolution.”

Misha Angrist, Assistant Professor, Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy, and author of Here is a Human Being
“Eric Topol is that rare physician willing to challenge the orthodoxies of his guild. He recognizes that in the U.S., health care business-as-usual is unsustainable. But he does not despair. He bears witness to the rise of Homo digitus and the promise it holds to upend the inefficiencies and dysfunction so entrenched in clinical medicine. The Creative Destruction of Medicine is a timely tour de force. It is a necessary heresy.”

Clayton M. Christensen, Robert and Jane Cizik Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School, and author of The Innovator's Dilemma
“Eric Topol gives us an eye-opening look at what's possible in healthcare if people can mobilize to charge the status quo. The Creative Destruction of Medicine is simply remarkable.”

Mehmet Oz, M.D., Professor and Vice-Chair of Surgery, NY Presbyterian/Columbia University
“Eric Topol outlines the creative destruction of medicine that must be led by informed consumers. Smart patients will push the many stakeholders in health to accelerate change as medicine adapts to a new world of information and technology.”

Jeffrey Immelt, Chairman and CEO of General Electric
“Eric Topol has been a longtime innovator in healthcare. In The Creative Destruction of Medicine, he citesthe big waves of innovation that will save healthcare for the future. Real healthcare reform has not yet begun, but it will. The Creative Destruction of Medicine lays out the path.”

Siddhartha Mukherjee, author of The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer
“What happens when you combine cellular phone technology with the cellular aberrations in disease? Or create a bridge between the digital revolution with the medical revolution? How will minute biological sensors alter the way we treat lethal illnesses, such as heart attacks or cancer? This marvelous book by Eric Topol, a leading cardiologist, gene hunter and medical thinker, answers not just these questions, but many many more. Topol's analysis draws us to the very frontlines of medicine, and leaves us with a view of a landscape that is both foreign and daunting. He manages to recount this story in simple, lucid language—resulting in an enthralling and important book.”

Steve Case, co-founder, AOL, and founder of Revolution LLC
“Health care is poised to be revolutionized by two forces—technology and consumerism—and Dr. Eric Topol explains why. One-size-fits-all medicine will soon be overtaken by highly personalized, customized solutions that are enabled by breakthroughs in genomics and mobile devices and propelled by empowered consumers looking to live longer, healthier lives. Fasten your seat belts and get ready for the ride—and learn what steps you can take to begin to take control of your health.”

James Fowler, Professor of Medical Genetics and Political Science, UC San Diego, and author of Connected
“Eric Topol is uniquely positioned to write such a timely and important book. He leads two institutions—one in genomics and one in wireless health—that will each play a huge role in transforming medicine in the twenty-first century. From this vantage point, he can see unifying themes that will underlie the coming revolution in population and personal health, and he communicates his vision with vibrant energy. Everyone will want to read this book.”

Omar Ishrak, Chairman and CEO of Medtronic
“Eric Topol provides an excellent and pragmatic view of the U.S. healthcare system from a patient's perspective. He then offers, through numerous examples, an exciting vision for the future ... when technology can be used to dramatically improve the quality of care and reduce cost at the same time. The Creative Destruction of Medicine is a highly informative and enjoyable book, which truly triggers the reader's imagination as to what is possible”
 
Reed Tuckson, M.D., Executive Vice President and Chief of Medical Affairs, UnitedHealth Group
“Eric Topol has written an extraordinarily important book at just the right moment. Drawing upon a unique and impressive array of convergent expertise in medical research, clinical medicine, consumer and health technological advancements, and health policy, Dr. Topol opens the door for an essential discussion of old challenges viewed through an innovative lens. In the context of increasingly unaffordable health care costs, suboptimal quality of care delivery, a tsunami of preventable chronic illness, and new accountabilities for consumer's health choices and behaviors, this book helps  all of us to think about solutions in new and exciting ways!”

George Church, Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School
“What happens when the super-convergence of smart phones further combines with million-fold lower-cost genomics and diverse wearable sensors? The riveting answer leads compellingly to a call to activism—not only for medical care providers, but all patients and everyone looking for the next ‘disruptive' economic revolution. This future is closer than most of us would have imagined before seeing it laid out so clearly. A must-read.”

J. Craig Venter, Chairman and President, J. Craig Venter Institute
“Our sequencing of the human genome eleven years ago was the beginning of the individualized medicine revolution, a revolution that cannot happen without digitized personal phenotype information. Eric Topol provides a path forward using your digitized genome, remote sensing devices and social networking to place the educated at the center of medicine.”

Kirkus Reviews
The director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute suggests that in the not-too-distant future DNA testing and sequencing may become available on a smartphone. The former chairman of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic and founder of its cardiovascular gene bank, Topol looks to a future in which genomics will be one of the major tools of innovative, individualized medicine. "What constitutes evidence-based medicine today is what is good for a large population," he writes, "not for any particular individual." Not so in the future. The author is aware of instances in which pharmaceutical companies attempt to violate the principle of evidence-based medicine by suppressing negative results. In fact, Topol was the first to reveal "significant heart attack and stroke concerns for both Vioxx and Celebrex," information he published in the New England Journal of Medicine. As a result of his whistle-blowing, he was forced out of his position at the Clinic in 2004, when the two drugs were finally removed from the market. The author explains how "the large-scale randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed under the most rigorous conditions" will be superseded by individualized medicine. Sequencing the human genome opened up major new areas of preventative medicine; in the future these procedures will be able to identify medications that will benefit, or be injurious to, a small portion of the population who carry a specific genetic mutation, rather than the population at large. Topol weaves useful knowledge about how to evaluate the choices open to patients into this exciting account of the revolutionary changes we can expect.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781452657042
Publisher:
Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date:
03/19/2012
Edition description:
MP3 - Unabridged CD
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 7.40(h) x 0.60(d)

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"Topol weaves useful knowledge about how to evaluate the choices open to patients into this exciting account of the revolutionary changes we can expect." —-Kirkus

Meet the Author

Reader of over four hundred audiobooks, Dick Hill has won three coveted Audie Awards and been nominated numerous times. He is also the recipient of several AudioFile Earphones Awards. AudioFile includes Dick on their prestigious list of Golden Voices.

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The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution is Creating Personalized Medicine for All 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dr. Topol presents a great argument for the benefit of personal genomics and electronic health records. Far from conspiracy or wild theories against Big Pharma, Topol is a scientist first and gives compelling evidence for genetic testing to revolutionize personal medication and dosing. This may be bit of a tough read for someone without any biology education, but still worth it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Topol weaves a world that is feasible here and now in his (first!) book for consumers. He goes to great lengths to convince the reader that medicine needs to change and evolve to accommodate the evolution (or revolution!) of those who depend on it. Consumers are becoming ever more aware of their own vitals and this book explains why physicians need to keep up and more importantly...how! GREAT READ!!!
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PokerfaceMom More than 1 year ago
How can a book about the digital revolution not be available in a digital format? I haven't read it yet, so ignore the rating, but one can't post without it.