The Crooked Path to Victory: Drugs and Cheating in Professional Bicycle Racing

Overview

The Crooked Path to Victory exposes the dishonest ways to which bicycle racers and managers have resorted over the years in an lighthearted but thorough manner.Whether it's in pursuit of the Yellow Jersey of the Tour de France or the Rainbow Jersey of the World Champion, professional bicycle racing has not always been fair play all the way.From the early days on, the sport has attracted more than its share of cheats. In recent years, the use of doping, i.e. performance-enhancing drugs, has been getting increasing...
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Overview

The Crooked Path to Victory exposes the dishonest ways to which bicycle racers and managers have resorted over the years in an lighthearted but thorough manner.Whether it's in pursuit of the Yellow Jersey of the Tour de France or the Rainbow Jersey of the World Champion, professional bicycle racing has not always been fair play all the way.From the early days on, the sport has attracted more than its share of cheats. In recent years, the use of doping, i.e. performance-enhancing drugs, has been getting increasing publicity, resulting in tightened controls--but also in more lies and denials.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781892495402
  • Publisher: Cycle Publishing
  • Publication date: 7/1/2003
  • Series: Cycling Resources series
  • Pages: 176
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Les Woodland is a cycling writer and journalist who has followed the professional racing scene for 30 years. His previous books include The Unknown Tour de France, which was also published by Van der Plas Publications. He lives alternately in East Anglia, Ingland, and near Toulouse in France.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2008

    A reviewer

    Cyclists have used drugs to improve their performance almost since the invention of the bicycle. At first the pharmacopoeia was primitive: ether, wine, cocaine, strychnine. The riders used anything they thought would ease the misery of the impossibly long distances that characterized racing in the early twentieth century. Over time, as the drugs grew more effective, the riders adopted them. In the 1930s amphetamines were synthesized, followed by steroids, EPO and now human growth hormone. Almost always the riders have stayed 1 step ahead of the detectors. Going back to nineteenth century original sources, Les Woodland has put together a riveting and distressing chronicle of cheating in bicycle racing. His discussion of the 1998 Festina scandal is simply superb. As with all of Woodland¿s books, it is written with style and authority. This man knows the sport as few others. - Bill McGann, Author of The Story of the Tour de France

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