The Crown Jewels: The British Secrets at the Heart of the KGB Archives

Overview

This lively account of Soviet foreign intelligence activity in Great Britain during the Cold War is based on documents newly released from the KGB archives, their "crown jewels", as the KGB unofficially called its most valuable assets. Written by Nigel West, called by the Sunday Times "the unofficial historian of the secret services," and Oleg Tsarev, a former KGB lieutenant colonel .

The Crown Jewels provides much new information on the activities of all the well-known British...

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Overview

This lively account of Soviet foreign intelligence activity in Great Britain during the Cold War is based on documents newly released from the KGB archives, their "crown jewels", as the KGB unofficially called its most valuable assets. Written by Nigel West, called by the Sunday Times "the unofficial historian of the secret services," and Oleg Tsarev, a former KGB lieutenant colonel .

The Crown Jewels provides much new information on the activities of all the well-known British pro-Soviet spies, including Kim Philby, Guy Burgess, Donald Maclean, and Anthony Blunt, as well as many lesser-known spymasters and recruiters, reproducing many of their reports for the first time. The book adds unsuspected dimensions to the famous Cambridge ring (including details of Burgess's offer to murder his fellow conspirator Goronwy Rees). It also reveals a completely unknown Soviet network based in London and headed by a named Daily Herald journalist; describes the huge scale of Soviet penetration of the British Foreign Office from 1927 to 1951; explores a previously unknown spy ring in Oxford; and tells about the key role played by Blunt in supervising post-war Soviet espionage activities in London.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780300078060
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/1999
  • Pages: 384
  • Product dimensions: 6.47 (w) x 9.58 (h) x 1.26 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
Soviet Intelligence
Introduction
I The Reds are Coming 1
II The Zinoviev Letter 33
III Rezident in London 44
IV The Secrets of Room 22 63
V Codename DUNCAN 96
VI The Great Illegals 103
VII Burgess and Blunt 127
VIII The KLATT Affair 187
IX The Vegetarian 204
X Atom Secrets 227
XI Codename SHAH 256
Postscript 272
App. I Some of the documents passed to Moscow by Anthony Blunt 279
App. II The Philby Reports 294
Glossary of Soviet Intelligence Codenames 346
Source Notes 349
Index 357
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 1999

    Soviet Espionaage of British Secrets

    Another recent book on the Soviet spy system worldwide. Recently obtained secret documents released by Russia concerning the Stalin era espionage. The disclosure of names of spies not publically released before has cleared up some accusations made 50 years ago. We find that one 85 year grandmother recently confessed to being a spy when confronted by the media after this new information was released. This is part of what makes this book so interesting and evidently accurate. This book has information that parallels information released in a couple of other recent releases. Just like in the book, when two sources unknown to one another, present the same information, then one can send that information on up the line.

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