The Crying of The Children [NOOK Book]

Overview

It is 1830 and in the slums of Paradise Court there is little help for those who need it most. Rose Skinner, little more than a child herself, is dead, her daughter only hours old. Maggie Skinner takes the baby home, vowing that she will take care of the child - her granddaughter.

Joseph Skinner refuses to allow the child to stay in the house and Maggie, submissive after years of his bullying, must find the strength to stand up to her husband. ...

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The Crying of The Children

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Overview

It is 1830 and in the slums of Paradise Court there is little help for those who need it most. Rose Skinner, little more than a child herself, is dead, her daughter only hours old. Maggie Skinner takes the baby home, vowing that she will take care of the child - her granddaughter.

Joseph Skinner refuses to allow the child to stay in the house and Maggie, submissive after years of his bullying, must find the strength to stand up to her husband. When she collapses at Rose's funeral, he has the child taken away to Ireland.

Maggie recovers thanks to Dr. Daniel Taylor and, with his support and the help of Mandrake Junior, she begins the search for her granddaughter.
She becomes aware of rumours of cruelty, especially to the children, in her husband's factory and is asked by Mandrake to betray him. Reluctant to do so, she visits the factory and becomes concerned at what she sees.
In the workhouse, two children, separated by rules made by those who see poverty as a self inflicted condition, must bear the grief of losing their parents alone, seeing each other only in passing, until the day that the boy, Thomas, is taken by Joseph Skinner and thrown into the cellar that runs the length of the factory.

His sister, Lizzie, finds her own way of dealing with her despair at Thomas's disappearance. Soon she will be old enough for the vile trade into which Edwin Perry, son of the Master, recruits 'his' girls. She will be 13 and headed for the back streets of London. She has no choice - she has to leave. On the coldest night of the year, she walks through the workhouse gates. But she is not alone.

The lives of those who live in the poverty of Paradise Square, the children of the workhouse, the factory children and those who are slowly dying in the cellar, intermingle, drawn together by cirumstance.

Maggie draws strength from new friendships made in unexpected places and stands up to the bullying of her husband while he is determined to punish his wife by punishing those she is trying to help.

As Mandrake and Daniel Taylor fight to save the children, Maggie becomes more and more unsure that her granddaughter will be found. The search moves from Ireland to Liverpool and from Liverpool to much closer to home without any sign of Ellie. When the canal that runs behind the cottage of Bertha Mason is searched, Maggie is sure that the child is dead.
Daniel, becoming fond of Maggie, helps her to understand that she may have to accept that Ellie is not coming home. And, as Maggie faces this possibility, she must also accept that she is about to lose the home she loves as her husband becomes more and more aggressive and Daniel, fearing for her safety, begs her to leave.

But there is one more revelation that Maggie must deal with. There is one more thing she must do, for Rose and for Ellie. Joseph Skinner must be stopped.

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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940044244214
  • Publisher: Peggi Lennard
  • Publication date: 1/2/2013
  • Sold by: Smashwords
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 83,221
  • File size: 438 KB

Meet the Author

I confess that I am older than the photo would have you believe but, in my defense, I have to say that I have reached the age where white lies are permissible, if not compulsory.
I am a happily entrenched wife, mother, nan, sister, friend. Writing is my passion, but my family is my life.
Now that my grandchildren are grown and don't really want to be seen out with me because that's just not cool any more and what on earth would they do if their friends saw them having a pizza with their NAN, I can find the time to indulge myself in my second love.
Through the years, I have had short stories published in women's magazines, but The Crying of the Children is my first novel.
I have grown fond of the characters in the book, perhaps because one or two of them were inspired by people I knew. Relatives long since gone developed a habit of popping into my mind. Old, curled-up sepia photographs brought them back to life and stories I'd been told as a child resurfaced.
It was an enjoyable, annoying, frustrating, rewarding experience.
I am now getting annoyed and frustrated at the sequel.
Some people never learn!

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 17, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    This Authors debut novel is definitely not a book for those who

    This Authors debut novel is definitely not a book for those who have a weak stomach, or are easily upset by the written word.  I’m not one of these types, but even I found that, at times, I had to put this book down and walk away to regroup my emotions and my mind.

    The locations for the novel is the very grim and very private world of Victorian England so, with this in mind it is not surprising to see there is very little real depth or back story to any of the characters; and this is how it would’ve have been in real life, Wives would have known little about their Husbands and the servants would have known how to keep their mouths shut.  In abiding by this social expectation, in her writing the Author actually paints in very vivid detail the personalities and traits that make up her characters; and there is a very large list of them ranging from a despicable wealthy man of society right down to the lowest of the low.

    To live in poverty in 19th century Britain was not how we see living in poverty in 21st century Britain, and the Author has done an outstanding job of capturing the misery of those in this situation.  She has held back no punches when it comes to describing the choices open to these people, and what they had to do just to survive from day to day.  Her descriptions of ‘parental’ discipline are graphic and moving, and serve to illustrate that children were regarded as a disposable commodity.

    There were places in this novel were the hand of a good proof-reader and editor would have come into play, and made the book even more haunting.  In places the Author gets her characters mixed up, and I found myself having to flip back the pages to get them straight in my own head.  This did detract from my enjoyment of the book, but still made it something I wanted to read on to the end to discover what the outcome would be.

    I would recommend this novel to lovers of the history genre, both fiction and non-fiction as, at times, this novel becomes something more than just a story; it turns into a social commentary of the times it covers.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2013

    This as a wonderful story. Would definitely recommend reading. R

    This as a wonderful story. Would definitely recommend reading. Really breaks your heart in places.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2014

    Great book

    Couldnt put down

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2014

    Reader

    Very good read

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2014

    haven't

    I have found it very dark and depressing so far. will have to be in the mood

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2014

    lovt Love it!

    Very hard to put down

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2014

    Booklover

    Really good book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2013

    What to say

    Depressing at times. A lot of sadness but period of time it was written about - very likely very true. The only change would be the ending. Let him have a stoke and not be able to speak - put in a cellar under the same conditions he subjected others to, for a period of time. Or at least let him be aware of who was responsible for his death. This book had a need for revenge written all over it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews

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