The Cryptoterrestrials

The Cryptoterrestrials

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by Mac Tonnies
     
 

What if the "aliens" are not from other planets? In THE CRYPTOTERRESTRIALS, Mac Tonnies proposes that at least some accounts of alien visitation can be attributed to a humanoid species indigenous to the Earth, a sister race that has adapted to our numerical superiority by developing a surprisingly robust technology. At the same time, this groundbreaking work attempts…  See more details below

Overview

What if the "aliens" are not from other planets? In THE CRYPTOTERRESTRIALS, Mac Tonnies proposes that at least some accounts of alien visitation can be attributed to a humanoid species indigenous to the Earth, a sister race that has adapted to our numerical superiority by developing a surprisingly robust technology. At the same time, this groundbreaking work attempts to reconcile the mythological and contemporary accounts of "little people" into a coherent picture. "For too long, we've called them 'aliens,' assuming that we represent our planet's best and brightest," writes Tonnies. "Maybe that's exactly what they want us to think."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781933665467
Publisher:
Anomalist Books
Publication date:
03/01/2010
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
496,876
Product dimensions:
4.90(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.40(d)

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The Cryptoterrestrials 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
OdinnScout More than 1 year ago
Interesting theory that is not the standard ETH. Don't expect to find evidence to support the crypoterrestrials, this is more like someone thinking out loud. Still I think its definitely a book to check out. If nothing else its a breath of fresh air in Ufology field.
TylerKokjohn More than 1 year ago
Concluding that ufology suffers from "creative anemia," Mac Tonnies offers his thoughts and conjectures toward a unifying hypothesis regarding the continuing UFO enigma. Abandoning the familiar extraterrestrial hypothesis (ETH), Tonnies proposes we share our planet with a secretive race of sister humanoids indigenous to the Earth he dubs the cryptoterrestrials. Although controversial, genomic sequence data may reveal interbreeding and genetic hybridization occurred between extinct Neanderthals and a portion of what is now the modern human lineage making the "cryptoterrestrial hypothesis (CTH)" appear plausible. In addition, the CTH eliminates the need to explain how aliens navigated the vast expanses of outer space and why they are the close genetic kin of humans. Nonetheless, the CTH as outlined in this book will be rejected by mainstream scientists. Attempting to explain the testimony of abductees and simultaneously reconcile it with the UFO phenomenon as a whole, Tonnies ventures far beyond the limits of the data and ordinary credulity. Deducing the cryptoterrestrials suffer from a genetic malady he further stipulates the cure demands genetic hybridization with humans. However, other than abductees, no one has ever seen a cryptoterrestrial being. Diagnosing a genetic disease without access to patients is impossible and extrapolating this unspecified defect afflicts an entire race unknown to science is unfounded speculative folly. And how about the cure for what ails them? The rationale for fusing the human and cryptoterrestrial gene pool arises from the hypothesized close relationship between the two species. However, if this kinship is so intimate DNA hybridization is possible, the cryptoterrestrials would have no need to enlist the help of human genetics. In that case the genetic sequences will be virtually identical and if they have their genetic information, they already know the human genomic sequence as well. They should be able to diagnose and correct their issues without recourse to abducting and analyzing humans. For all practical purposes, the CTH is a reformulation of the classic ETH within a limited physical scope. It offers no new experimental avenues to explore and seems destined to influence mainstream science not at all. The lasting legacy of Mac Tonnies may be that he opened a critical dialogue concerning the ETH and marshaled evidence and arguments to supplant it with a better science-based alternative. Perhaps his efforts to question authority and root out whatever truth is discoverable will inspire a new generation of seekers.