BN.com Gift Guide

The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man (Burton and Swinburne Series #2)

( 9 )

Overview

Mark Hodder's second Burton & Swinburne steampunk adventure, following the acclaimed The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack, is filled with eccentric steam-driven technology, grotesque characters, and a deepening mystery. When a clockwork-powered man of brass is found abandoned in Trafalgar Square, Burton and his assistant, the wayward poet Algernon Swinburne, find themselves on the trail of the stolen Garnier Collection--black diamonds rumored to be fragments of the Lemurian Eye of Naga, a meteorite that ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (3) from $21.17   
  • Used (3) from $21.17   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$21.17
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(82)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Good
London 2011 Hard cover Good. The book has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact. Some minor wear to the spine. Library binding. ... *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

Ships from: Goring-By-Sea, United Kingdom

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$42.54
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(79)

Condition: Very Good
Very Good Ships from the UK. Former Library book. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. Your purchase also supports literacy charities. *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is ... shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

Ships from: Dunfermline, United Kingdom

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$80.37
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(1)

Condition: Good
Hardcover Good 1907777024 Used book. Previously owned and is blemished. Cover rubbed w/ corner and binding wear. Interior page markings (highlighting/writing) and owner's name. ... An inventory sticker on the back and a used sticker on the spine. Textblock has a marking. Read more Show Less

Ships from: North Port, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 12%)$11.99 List Price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

Mark Hodder's second Burton & Swinburne steampunk adventure, following the acclaimed The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack, is filled with eccentric steam-driven technology, grotesque characters, and a deepening mystery. When a clockwork-powered man of brass is found abandoned in Trafalgar Square, Burton and his assistant, the wayward poet Algernon Swinburne, find themselves on the trail of the stolen Garnier Collection--black diamonds rumored to be fragments of the Lemurian Eye of Naga, a meteorite that fell to Earth in prehistoric times. From a haunted mansion to the Bedlam madhouse, from South America to Australia, from séances to a secret labyrinth, Burton struggles with shadowy opponents and his own inner demons. Can the king's agent expose a plot that threatens to rip the British Empire apart, leading to an international conflict the like of which the world has never seen? And what part does the clockwork man have to play?
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The alternate Victorian London of Hodder's latest fantasy is stuffed with eccentricities: each fascinating in itself, but adding up eventually to a slightly stultifying overabundance (not to mention Hodder's tendency toward painful puns, like the "Folk's Wagon" made out of an actual Beetle). Mercifully these fade into the background as the plot kicks into high gear with explorer Richard Burton and his sidekick, masochistic poet Swinburne, sleuth out the truth behind a bewildering conspiracy of rakes, technologists, psychics, black diamonds, time travelers, and a butcher claiming to be an aristocrat. The investigation also leads the protagonists to different countries. Hodder handles these cross-cultural encounters surprisingly well. Furthermore, the overarching theme of being stuck down a wrong turn in history adds a touch of atmosphere both ominous and bittersweet. Ultimately though, the many characters, places, plot twists and turns fail to work together to keep the reader's attention. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
Praise for the Philip K. Dick Award-winning Burton & Swinburne books:

"The usual superlatives for really clever fantasy (imaginative, mind-bending, phantasmagorical) aren't nearly big enough for this debut novel. With this one book, Hodder has put himself on the genre map."
-Booklist, starred review of The Strange Affair of Spring-Heeled Jack

"Hodder, with an encyclopedic grasp of period detail, tellingly brings these disparate, oddly familiar yet eerily different worlds to fecund life. Enthralling, dizzying, and as impressive as they come."
-Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"Every once in a while I come across a book, or series of books, that totally yanks the carpet out from under me. Then it reaches out, smashes me in the face with its awesomeness, and says, 'You love me!' Leaving me with naught to do but obligingly respond, 'Yes. Yes I do.' [The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man] was every bit the book that I had hoped it would be."
-Elitist Book Reviews

"Whatever one chooses to call [The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack], it would be very difficult to deny its overwhelming brilliance. I can't remember the last time a novel has surprised, awed, and enthused me so utterly that I'm almost left at a loss for words for how to recommend it."
-Rob Will Review

Library Journal
Sir Richard Burton, the king's agent, and Algernon Swinburne, his companion and intellectual foil, realize that the course of their world has been altered because something has tampered with time. The discovery of a clockwork automaton in Trafalgar Square, the search for the missing Garnier collection of black diamonds, the media surrounding the grotesque person who claims to be the heir to the cursed Tichborne Estate, and the threat of class warfare in Victorian England confront the pair as they fight to right the history of the world and avert a shattering war. In this sequel to The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack, Hodder continues the entertaining adventures of Burton and Swinburne as he depicts a bizarrely engrossing steampunk England in 1862 and introduces period notables, including Herbert Spencer, Florence Nightingale, and Charles Babbage. VERDICT Hodder knows Victorian history well enough to take delightful liberties in a darkly humorous adventure that should appeal to genre fans as well as those interested in alternate histories.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Mark Hodder is the author of The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack--winner of the Philip K. Dick Award 2010--and its sequel, The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man. He's the creator and caretaker of the Blakiana website (http://www.sextonblake.co.uk), which he designed to celebrate, record, and revive Sexton Blake, the most written-about fictional detective in English publishing history. A former BBC writer, editor, journalist, and Web producer, Mark has worked in all the new and traditional medias and was based in London for most of his working life until 2008, when he relocated to Valencia in Spain to de-stress and write novels. He has a degree in cultural studies and loves British history (1850 to 1950, in particular), good food, cutting-edge gadgets, cult TV (ITC forever!), Tom Waits, and a vast assortment of oddities.
Read More Show Less

First Chapter

THE CURIOUS CASE OF THE CLOCKWORK MAN


By MARK HODDER

Prometheus Books

Copyright © 2011 Mark Hodder
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-61614-359-6


Chapter One

THE MAN OF BRASS

A handsome reward will be given to any person who can furnish such information as will discover the fate of Roger Charles Tichborne. He sailed from Rio de Janeiro on the 20th of April 1854 in the ship La Bella, and has never been heard of since, but a report reached England to the effect that a portion of the crew and passengers of a vessel of that name was picked up by a vessel bound to Australia, Melbourne it is believed. It is not known whether the said Roger Charles Tichborne was among the drowned or saved. He would at the present time be about thirty-two years of age, is of a delicate constitution, rather tall, with very light-brown hair, and blue eyes. Mr. Tichborne is the son of Sir James Tichborne, now deceased, and is heir to all his estates. —Advertisement, newspapers worldwide, 1861

Sir Richard Francis Burton was dead.

He was lying on his back in the lobby of the Royal Geographical Society, sprawled at the bottom of the grand staircase with a diminutive red-haired poet slumped across his chest.

Algernon Charles Swinburne, tears streaming down his cheeks, his senses befuddled with alcohol, quickly composed an elegy. It was, after all, best to strike while the iron was hot.

He raised his head, his hair fiery in the flickering gas light, and, in his high-pitched voice, proclaimed:

      Wouldst thou not know whom England, whom the world,
      Mourns? For the world whose wildest ways he trod,
      And smiled their dangers down that coiled and curled
      Against him, knows him now less man than god.

He hiccupped.

Beneath his hand, in Burton's jacket, he felt a flask-shaped lump. Surreptitiously, he began to wiggle his fingers into the pocket.

"Our demigod of daring, keenest-eyed," he continued, with a sniff. "To read and deepest—"

"Atrocious!" a voice thundered from the top of the stairs.

Swinburne looked up.

Sir Roderick Murchison stood imperiously on the landing.

"Keep your hands to yourself, Algy," came a whisper.

Swinburne looked down.

Burton's eyes were open.

"Atrocious behaviour!" Murchison boomed again.

The president of the Royal Geographical Society descended with dignity and poise. His back was ramrod straight. His bald head was shining. He passed portraits of the great explorers: James Cook, Sir Walter Raleigh, John Franklin, Sir Francis Drake—this latter painting was hanging askew, having been struck by Burton's passing foot—William Hovell, Mungo Park, and others.

"I'll not brook such conduct, Burton! This is a respectable scientific establishment, not a confounded East End tavern!"

Swinburne fell back as his friend, the former soldier, explorer, and spy— the linguist, scholar, author, swordsman, geographer, and king's agent— staggered to his feet and stood swaying, glowering at Murchison, his onetime sponsor.

"Alive, then?" the poet muttered, gazing bemusedly at his friend.

At five foot eleven, Burton appeared taller, due to the breadth of his shoulders, depth of his chest, and slim athletic build. As inebriated as he was, he radiated power. His eyes were black and mesmeric, his cheekbones prominent, his mouth set aggressively. He had short black hair, which he wore swept backward, and a fierce mustache and beard, forked and devilish. A deep scar disfigured his left cheek, tugging slightly at his bottom eyelid, and there was a smaller one on the right, each marking the path of a Somali spear that had been thrust through his face during a disastrous expedition to Berbera.

"You're a damnable drunkard!" Murchison barked as he reached the bottom step. His narrow features suddenly softened. "Are you hurt?"

Burton snarled his response: "It'll take more than a tumble down the bloody stairs to break me!"

Swinburne scrambled up from the floor. He was tiny, just five foot two, and slope-shouldered. His head, perched on such a diminutive body, and with its mop of carroty hair, seemed perfectly enormous. He had pale-green eyes and was clean shaven. He appeared much younger than his twenty-four years.

"Confound it," he squeaked. "Now I'll have to use the elegy for somebody else. Who died recently? Anyone noteworthy? Did you like it, Richard? The bit about 'For the world whose wildest ways he trod' was especially appropriate, I thought."

"Be quiet, Swinburne!" Murchison snapped. "Burton, I'm not trying to break you, if that's what you're implying. Henry Stanley was better financed to settle the Nile question than you. I had little choice but to add the Society's backing to that which he received from his newspaper."

"And now he's disappeared!" Burton growled. "How many flying machines have to vanish over Africa's Lake Regions before you realise that the only way in is on foot?"

"I'm well aware of the problem, sir, and I'll have you know that I warned Stanley. It was his newspaper that insisted he take rotorchairs!"

"Pah! I know the area better than any man in the entire British Empire, but you saw fit to send a damn fool journalist. Who next, Murchison? Perhaps a dance troupe from the music halls?"

Sir Roderick stiffened. He crossed his arms over his chest and replied, icily: "Samuel Baker wants to mount a rescue mission, as does John Petherick, but whomever I send, it shan't be you, of that you can be certain. Your days as a geographer are over. It appears, however, that your days as a drinker are not!"

Burton clenched his teeth, tugged at his jacket, took a deep breath, paused, sighed it out, and all of a sudden the fight left him. He said, in a subdued tone: "Sam and John are good men. Accomplished. They know how to handle the natives. My apologies, Sir Roderick, I find it difficult to let go. I still think of the Nile question as mine to answer, though, in truth, I have a new and entirely different role to play now."

"Ah, yes. I heard a rumour that Palmerston has employed you. Is it true?"

Burton nodded. "It is."

"As what?"

"In truth, it's hard to say. I'm titled the 'king's agent.' It's something of an investigative role."

"Then I would think you're well suited to it."

"Perhaps. But I still take an interest in—well—sir, if you hear anything—"

"I'll get word to you," Murchison interrupted curtly. "Now go. Get some coffee. Sober up. Have some self-respect, man!"

The president turned and stamped back up the stairs, straightening Drake's portrait as he passed it.

A valet fetched Burton and Swinburne their coats, hats, and canes, and the two men walked unsteadily across the lobby and out through the double doors.

The evening was dark and damp, glistening with reflections after the day's showers. A chill wind tugged at their clothes.

"Coffee at the Venetia Hotel?" Burton suggested, buttoning his black overcoat.

"Or another brandy and a bit of slap and tickle?" Swinburne countered. "Verbena Lodge isn't far from here."

"Verbena Lodge?"

"It's a house of ill repute where the birchings are—"

"Coffee!" Burton said.

They walked along Whitehall Place and turned right into Northumberland Avenue, heading toward Trafalgar Square. Swinburne began to sing a song of his own composition:

      If you were queen of pleasure,
      And I were king of pain,
      We'd hunt down love together,
      Pluck out his flying-feather,
      And teach his feet a measure,
      And find his mouth a rein;
      If you were queen of pleasure,
      And I were king of pain.

His tremulous piping attracted disapproving glances from passersby. Despite the bad weather and the late hour, there were plenty of people about, mainly gentlemen strolling to and fro between the city's restaurants and clubs.

"Oh, bugger it," the poet cursed. "I think I just sang the last verse first. Now I'll have to start again."

"Please don't trouble yourself on my account," Burton murmured.

A velocipede—or "penny-farthing," as some wag had christened the vehicles—chugged past, pumping steam from its tall funnel into the already dense atmosphere of London.

"Hal-lo!" the rider exclaimed as he passed them, his voice rendered jittery as the vehicle's huge rubber-banded front wheel communicated every bump of the cobbled street to his spine. "W-what's g-going on in the s-square?"

Burton peered ahead, struggling to focus his eyes. There was, indeed, some sort of commotion. A crowd had gathered, and he could see the cockscomb helmets of police constables moving among the top hats.

He took Swinburne by the arm. "Come along," he urged. "Let's see what the hullabaloo is all about."

"For pity's sake slow down, will you!" complained his companion, who had to match Burton's every stride with two of his own. "You'll render me horrendously sober at this pace!"

"Incidentally, Algy, in the event of my demise, perhaps you'd show a little more restraint with the god and demigod references," Burton grumbled.

"Ha! What a contrary fellow you are! On the one hand you seem obsessed by religions; on the other, repelled by them!"

"Humph! These days, I'm more interested in the underlying motivation— in the reasons why a man is willing to be guided by a god whose existence is, at best, impossible to prove and, at worst, an obvious fabrication. It seems to me that in these times of rapid scientific and industrial advancement, the procurement of knowledge has become too intimidating a prospect for the average man, so he's shunning it entirely in favour of faith. Faith requires nothing but blind adherence, whereas knowledge demands the continual apprehension of an ever-expanding body of information. With faith, one can at least claim knowledge without having to do the hard work of acquiring it!"

"I say!" Swinburne cried. "Well said, old chap! Well said! You hardly slurred a single word! You're eminently reprehensible!"

"You mean comprehensible."

"I know what I mean. But Richard, surely Darwin's natural evolution has rendered God undeniably defunct?"

"Indubitably. Which begs the question: to what falsehood will the uneducated masses willingly devote themselves next?"

They paced along, swinging their canes, their hats set at a jaunty angle. Despite the revitalising nip in the air, Burton was developing a headache. He decided to take a brandy with his coffee; perhaps it would numb the faint throbbing.

When they reached Trafalgar Square, the famous explorer plunged into the crowd and shouldered his way through it with Swinburne trailing in his wake. A constable stepped into their path, his hand raised.

"Stay back, please, gents."

Burton pulled out his wallet and withdrew from it a printed card. He showed it to the policeman who instantly saluted and stepped back.

"Beggin' your pardon, sir."

"Over here, Captain!" a deep, slightly husky voice called. Burton saw his friend Detective Inspector William Trounce of Scotland Yard standing at the base of Nelson's Column. Two people were with him: a young dark-skinned constable and, curiously, someone who was standing absolutely still, concealed from head to toe by a blanket.

Trounce met them with a hearty handshake. He was a bulky but amiable-looking individual, short but broad, with thick limbs and a barrel chest, bright twinkling blue eyes, and a large upward-curling brown mustache. His heavy square chin accurately hinted at a streak of stubbornness. He was wearing a dark worsted suit and a bowler hat.

"Hallo, chaps!" he said cheerfully. "Been drinking, have you?"

"Is it that obvious?" Burton mumbled.

"You didn't exactly cross the square as the crow flies."

"We're on our way to the Venetia for coffee."

"Very wise. Strong, black, with plenty of sugar. This is Constable Bhatti."

The policeman standing at Trounce's side saluted smartly. He was slender, youthful, and rather handsome.

"I've heard a lot about you, sir," he effused, with a slight Indian accent. "My cousin, Commander Krishnamurthy, was with you during the Old Ford affair."

He was referring to the recent battle that Burton, Swinburne, and a great many Scotland Yard men had fought against the Technologists and Rakes. Those two normally opposed groups—the one dedicated to scientific advancement, the other to anarchistic revolution—had banded together to try to capture a man from the future who'd become known as Spring Heeled Jack. Burton had defeated them and killed their quarry.

"Krishnamurthy's a thoroughly good egg," Swinburne noted. "But commander? Has he been promoted?"

"Yes, sir. It's a new rank in the force."

Trounce added: "They've made him head of the newly formed Flying Squad, and deservedly so. I don't know anyone who can handle a rotorchair the way Krishnamurthy does."

Burton nodded his approval and looked curiously at the silent, motionless blanket.

"So what's happening here, Trounce?"

The detective inspector turned to his subordinate. "Would you explain, please, Constable?"

"Certainly, sir." The young policeman looked at Burton and Swinburne and his dark eyes shone with excitement. "It's marvellous! An absolute wonder! Practically a work of art! I've never seen anything so intricate or—"

"Just the facts, please, lad," Trounce interjected.

"Yes, sir. Sorry, sir. This is my beat, you see, Captain Burton, and I pass through the square every fifty minutes or so. Tonight has been a quiet one. I've been making the rounds as usual, with nothing much to report aside from the customary prostitutes and drunkards—er—that is to say—"

He stopped, cleared his throat, cleared it again, and cast a pleading glance at his superior.

William Trounce laughed. "Don't worry, son, Captain Burton and Mr. Swinburne have been celebrating, that's all. Isn't that right, gents?"

"Quite so," Burton confirmed, self-consciously.

"And I wouldn't mind celebrating some more!" Swinburne announced.

Burton rolled his eyes.

Trounce addressed Bhatti: "So it was business as usual?"

The constable nodded. "Yes. I came on duty this evening at seven o'clock and passed this way three times without incident. On the fourth occasion, I noticed a crowd gathering here, where we're standing. I came over to investigate and found this—" He gestured at the concealed figure.

Trounce reached out and pulled the blanket away.

Burton and Swinburne gasped.

"Beautiful, isn't it!" Bhatti exclaimed.

A mechanical man stood before them. It was constructed from polished brass, slender, and about five feet five inches tall. The head was canister-shaped, flat at the top and bottom, and featureless but for three raised circular areas set vertically in the front. The top one was like a tiny ship's porthole, through which a great many motionless gears could be glimpsed, as small, complex, and finely crafted as the workings of a pocket watch. The middle circle held a mesh grille, and the bottomone was simply a hole out of which three very fine five-inch-long wires projected. They were straight and vibrated slightly in the breeze.

The neck consisted of thin shafts and cables, swivel joints and hinges. A slim cylinder formed the mechanical man's trunk. Panels were cut out of it, revealing cogwheels and springs, delicate little crankshafts, gyroscopes, flywheels, and a pendulum. The thin but sturdy arms ended in three-fingered hands. The legs were sturdy and tubular; the feet oval-shaped and slightly domed.

"It's a beauty, isn't it?" Constable Bhatti breathed. "Look here, in the small of the back. You see this hole? That's where the key goes."

"The key?" Burton asked.

"Yes! To wind it up! It's clockwork!"

"Bhatti, here," Detective Inspector Trounce put in, "is the Yard's amateur Technologist. Of all the policemen in London, he's certainly the right chap to have found this contraption."

"A happy coincidence for the constable," Swinburne observed glibly.

"It's my hobby," the young policeman enthused. "I attend a social club where we tinker with devices—trying to make them go faster or adapting them in various ways. Great heavens, the fellows would be beside themselves if I turned up with this specimen!"

Burton, who'd started to examine the brass figure with a magnifying glass, absently asked the policeman what he'd done after discovering it.

"The crowd was swelling—you know how Londoners flock around anything or anyone unusual—so I whistled for help. After a few constables had arrived, I gave the mechanism a thorough examination. I must admit, I got a little absorbed, so I probably didn't alert the Yard as quickly as I should have." He looked at Trounce. "Sorry about that, sir."

(Continues...)



Excerpted from THE CURIOUS CASE OF THE CLOCKWORK MAN by MARK HODDER Copyright © 2011 by Mark Hodder. Excerpted by permission of Prometheus Books. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2012

    What a remarkable imagination!

    The sequel to Springheeled Jack is entertaining and remarkable. His lobster supper dream world of a Steampunk Victorian England is ripe with cleverness and tightness of imaginative thinking. Readers of this genre are lucky. Hodder plays with time like a maestro. Recommended!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 18, 2012

    Convoluted but BRILLIANT!

    If you didn't read the first book in this series, "The Curious Case of Springheeled Jack" don't attempt this book. Their are too many references to things you wouldn't understand. Having said that this is fascinating story although it can often be difficult to keep up with Mr. Hodder's twists & turns. I believe this is the genre now referred to as "Steampunk."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 20, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    The sequel to The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack is a terrific alternative historical thriller

    In sort of 1862 in Trafalgar Square, someone abandons a clockwork brass man. The King's agent Sir Richard Francis Burton and his sidekick poet Algernon Swinburne investigate as the object is linked to the stolen Garnier Collection of black diamonds thought to be from the Lemurian Eye of Naga meteorite. Their inquiry leads to the Tichborne Claimant.

    A man claims that he is wealthy heir Roger Tichborne, who allegedly died at sea. Burton investigates this Tichborne while rioting amongst the lower class has broken out tied to this grotesque odd individual; anyone who knew the aristocrat before he was lost at sea would never recognize him as this claimant. However this Tichborne pretender in spite of one syllable one word droning responses somehow has the support of the angry lower class. The case turns crazier than time changing as Burton and Swinburne begin to connect dots of an insidious scheme that threatens the Empire and their sanity.

    The sequel to The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack is a terrific alternative historical thriller that is anchored by real nineteenth century persona like Florence Nightingale and Charles Doyle. Burton is a wonderful protagonist who knows destiny tilted as he remains haunted by some nefarious things he did. Herbert Spencer is a key character helping the lead duo stay focused on deciphering the clues of what increasingly appears is a plan to set the sun forever on the British Empire. Although it pays to read Spring Heeled Jack first as that sets the table, the Clockwork Man is more than just a middle book as adventures of Burton and Swinburne keep on occurring while time is running out on them.

    Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)