The Curious Writer / Edition 2

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Overview

The Curious Writer by Bruce Ballenger is an assignment-oriented, all-in-one rhetoric-reader-handbook that stresses the connections between personal and academic writing. Writing in a friendly, accessible voice that embodies his philosophy, the author emphasizes inquiry as a driving force behind the writing process and suggests that writers who begin with questions, rather than answers, are more likely to approach writing as a method of discovery and learning. The Curious Writer treats research, revision, and critical reading skills (of both texts and visuals) as organic components of every writing process. Each of the eight writing assignment chapters offers integrated coverage of these three key activities and also provides special attention to the Web as a resource for invention and research. The readings include 28 by a diverse range of professional writers, 17 by student writers (9 final drafts and 8 early drafts), and numerous excerpts and shorter examples by both professionals and students. The four-color art program includes 50 illustrations ranging from fine art and photographs to magazine advertisements and Web pages. Pedagogy includes eight full-length writing assignments, numerous shorter journal exercises, and helpful boxed features such as Inquiring Into the Details, Writing With Computers, and One Student's Response.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205620241
  • Publisher: Longman
  • Publication date: 2/20/2008
  • Series: Ballenger Series
  • Edition description: Concise
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 496
  • Product dimensions: 7.24 (w) x 9.26 (h) x 0.73 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface.

Acknowledgements.

I. THE SPIRIT OF INQUIRY.

1. Writing as Inquiry.

Motives for Writing.

Beliefs About Writing.

Exercise 1.1: What Do You Believe?

Unlearning Unhelpful Beliefs.

The Beliefs of This Book.

Writing Situations and Rhetorical Choices.

Habits of Mind.

Start With Questions Not Answers.

Suspend Judgment.

Search for Surprise.

Exercise 1.2: A Room Full of Details.

Writing As a Process.

Recognizing the Challenges

Exercise 1.3: What Is Your Writing Process?

Thinking About Your Process

Linear vs. Recursive Models

Dialectical Thinking

Exercise 1.4: Practicing Dialectical Thinking

Exercise 1.5: Overcome Your Own Challenges

Using What You've Learned

2. Reading as Inquiry.

Motives for Reading.

Beliefs About Reading.

Exercise 2.1: What Do You Believe?

Reading Situations and Rhetorical Choices.

Reading As a Process.

Linear vs. Recursive Models.

Exercise 2.2: Reading Strategies.

Dialectical Thinking.

Believing and Doubting.

Exercise 2.3: Practicing Dialectical Thinking.

Adapting to Unfamiliar Reading Situations.

Exercise 2.4: Further Practice: An Adaptive Response.

Reading Images.

Some Strategies For Reading Images.

Exercise 2.5: Reading Images.

Using What You’ve Learned.

3. Ways of Inquiring.

Opening Questions for Inquiry.

Exploration.

Exercise 3.1: Exploring “Migrant Mother.”

Explanation.

Exercise 3.2: Explaining a Marketing Strategy.

Evaluation.

Exercise 3.3: Evaluating “Generation X Goes to College.”

Reflection.

Exercise 3.4: Reflecting on Your Process.

Symphonic Inquiry.

Exercise 3.5: Creating Music with “Voice for the Lonely.”

Using What You've Learned.

II. INQUIRY PROJECTS.

4. Writing the Personal Essay.

Writing About Experience.

Motives for Writing the Personal Essay.

The Personal Essay and Academic Writing.

Features of the Form.

Exercise 4.1: Photographic Autobiography.

The Writing Process.

Thinking About Subjects.

Generating Ideas.

Judging What You've Got.

Writing the Sketch.

Moving From Sketch to Draft.

Gathering More Information: Research and Other Strategies.

Composing the Draft.

Workshopping the Draft.

Revising the Draft.

Polishing the Draft

Using What You've Learned.

5. Writing the Profile.

Writing About People.

Motives for Writing the Profile.

The Profile and Academic Writing.

Features of the Form.

Exercise 6.1: The POWs Wife.

The Writing Process.

Thinking About Subjects.

Generating Ideas.

Judging What You've Got.

Interviewing.

Writing the Sketch.

Moving From Sketch to Draft

Gathering More Information: Research and Other Strategies.

Composing the Draft.

Workshopping the Draft.

Revising the Draft.

Polishing the Draft.

Using What You've Learned.

6. Writing the Review.

Writing That Evaluates.

Motives for Writing the Review.

The Review and Academic Writing.

Features of the Form.

Exercise 6.1: What Makes a Good Movie?

The Writing Process.

Thinking About Subjects.

Generating Ideas.

Judging What You've Got.

Exercise 6.2: From Jury to Judgment.

Writing the Sketch.

Moving from Sketch to Draft.

Gathering More Information: Research and Other Strategies.

Composing the Draft.

Workshopping the Draft.

Revising the Draft.

Polishing the Draft.

Using What You've Learned.

7. Writing the Proposal.

Writing About Problems and Solutions.

Problems of Consequence

Problems of Scale

Motives for Proposals.

The Proposal and Academic Writing.

Features of the Form.

The Writing Process.

Thinking About Subjects.

Generating Ideas.

Judging What You've Got.

Writing the Sketch.

Moving from Sketch to Draft.

Gathering More Information: Research and Other Strategies.

Composing the Draft.

Workshopping the Draft.

Revising the Draft.

Polishing the Draft.

Using What You've Learned.

8. Writing the Persuasive Essay.

Writing to Convince People.

Getting Into Arguments.

Exercise 6.1: What Does It Meant to Argue?

Making Claims.

Two Sides to Every Argument.

Motives for Writing the Persuasive Essay.

The Persuasive Essay and Academic Writing.

Features of the Form.

The Writing Process.

Thinking About Subjects.

Generating Ideas.

Judging What You've Got.

Writing the Sketch.

Moving from Sketch to Draft.

Gathering More Information: Research and Other Strategies.

Composing the Draft.

Workshopping the Draft.

Revising the Draft.

Polishing the Draft.

Using What You've Learned.

9. Writing the Critical Essay.

Writing About Literature.

Motives for Writing the Critical Essay.

The Critical Essay and Academic Writing.

Features of the Form.

The Writing Process.

Thinking About Subjects.

Generating Ideas.

Judging What You've Got.

Writing the Sketch.

Moving from Sketch to Draft.

Gathering More Information: Research and Other Strategies.

Composing the Draft.

Workshopping the Draft.

Revising the Draft.

Polishing the Draft.

Using What You've Learned.

10. Writing the Ethnography.

Writing About Culture.

Motives for Writing Ethnography.

The Ethnography and Academic Writing.

Exercise 12.1: See the Web Before You Walk Into It

Features of the Form.

The Writing Process.

Generating Ideas.

Judging What You've Got.

Writing the Sketch.

Moving from Sketch to Draft.

Gathering More Information: Research and Other Strategies.

Composing the Draft.

Workshopping the Draft.

Revising the Draft.

Polishing the Draft.

Using What You've Learned.

III. INQUIRING DEEPER.

11. Writing the Research Essay.

Writing with Research.

Motives for Writing the Research Essay.

Exercise 11.1: An Atheist Goes to Church.

The Research Essay and Academic Writing.

Features of the Form.

Essay: Ann Braley-Smith, “Killing Bad Guys.”

Inquiring into the Essay

Essay: Atul Gwande, “Cold Comfort.”

Inquiring into the Essay

Essay: Amy Janan Johnson, “Examining the Maintenance of Friendships: Are There Differences Between Geographically Close and Long-Distance Friends?”

Inquiring into the Essay

Seeing the Form: To come

The Writing Process.

The Writing Process.

Generating Ideas.

Judging What You've Got.

Writing the Sketch.

Moving from Sketch to Draft.

Gathering More Information: Research and Other Strategies.

Composing the Draft

Workshopping the Draft.

Revising the Draft.

Polishing the Draft.

Using What You've Learned.

12. Methods of Collecting.

Research Techniques for Writers.

Research in the Electronic Age.

Magic Words That Open Doors.

Developing Working Knowledge.

Exercise 12.1: Working Knowledge: Getting the Lay of the Land.

Evaluating Web Sources.

Evaluating Library Sources.

Developing Deep Knowledge.

Exercise 12.2: Five Steps to Deep Knowledge.

Writing in the Middle: Beyond Note Cards.

Living Sources: Interviews and Surveys.

Arranging Interviews.

Planning Informal Surveys.

Citing Sources.

On Which Limbs Are You Standing?

What is Plagiarism?

MLA Documentation Guidelines.

APA Documentation Guidelines.

IV. RE-INQUIRING.

13. Divorcing the Draft.

Exercise 13.1: Time and Resistance to Revision.

Strategies for Divorcing the Draft.

Photography as a Metaphor: Seeing Past the First Picture.

Trusting the Twelfth Picture on the Roll.

The Pepper is More Than A Pepper.

Rhetorical Revision.

A Case Study in Revision: Jons Horserace of Meaning.

Student Essay: Jon Butterfield, “Blue Spirals.”

Becoming a Reader of Your Own Work.

Essay: Donald Murray, “The Makers Eye.”

14. Advanced Revision Strategies.

Five Categories of Revision.

Problems of Purpose.

Revision Strategy #14.1: What's Your Primary Motive?

Revision Strategy #14.2: What Do You Want to Know About What You Learned?

Revision Strategy #14.3: Finding the Focusing Question.

Revision Strategy #14.4: What's the Relationship?

Problems with Meaning.

Implicit or Explicit Meaning

What or More?

Methods for Discovering Your Thesis.

Revision Strategy #14.5: Find the “Instructive Line.”

Revision Strategy #14.6: Looping Toward a Thesis.

Revision Strategy #14.7: Reclaiming Your Topic.

Revision Strategy #14.8: Believing and Doubting.

Methods for Refining Your Thesis.

Revision Strategy #14.9: Questions as Knives.

Problems with Information.

Revision Strategy #14.10: Explode a Moment.

Revision Strategy #14.11: Beyond Examples.

Revision Strategy #14.12: Re-Search.

Problems with Structure.

Formal Academic Structures.

Revision Strategy #14.13: Reorganizing Around Thesis and Support.

Revision Strategy #14.14: Multiple Leads.

Revision Strategy #14.15: Cut and Paste Revision.

Problems of Clarity and Style.

Solving Problems of Clarity.

Revision Strategy #14.16: Untangling Paragraphs.

Revision Strategy #14.17: Cutting Clutter.

Revision Strategy #14.18: Removing “Verbal Tics.”

15: The Writing Workshop.

Making the Most of Peer Review.

Being Read.

Exercise 15.1: Workshopaphobia.

Divorcing the Draft.

Instructive Talk.

Models for Writing Workshops.

Full-Class Workshops.

Small Group Workshops.

One-on-One Peer Review.

The Writer's Responsibilities.

The Reader's Responsibilities.

What Can Go Wrong and What to Do About It.

Methods of Responding.

Experiential and Directive Responses.

Workshop Formats.

Appendices.

The Writing Portfolio.

The Literature Review.

The Annotated Bibliography.

The Essay Exam.

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